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Publication numberUS2756875 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1956
Filing dateSep 8, 1955
Priority dateSep 8, 1955
Publication numberUS 2756875 A, US 2756875A, US-A-2756875, US2756875 A, US2756875A
InventorsAlbert Yochim
Original AssigneeWallace A Erickson & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compartmented bag and package
US 2756875 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1956 A. YOCHIM GOMPARTMENTED BAG AND PACKAGE Filed Sept. 8, 1955 United States Patent i COMPARTMENTED BAG AND PACKAGE Albert Yochim, Villa; Park, Ill., assignor to Wallace A.

' i Erickson & Co., a corporation of Iliinois Application September8,19'55,- Serial No. 533,111

16 Claims. (Cl. 206 -47) This invention relates to compartmented bags that are suitable tor retaining and admixing a plurality of components within the confines of the bag, and compartmented packages each of which consists of a compartmented bag. plus a plurality of components that may be admixed within the confines of the bag.

The invention contemplates a package having at least two adjacent compartments separated by a rupturable sealing. partition Wall that may be used for admixing a plurality of components comprising: a sealed flexible bag having opposed lower and upper out'er barrier Walls and at least two inner adjacent sealed compartments separated by a flexible, rupturable sealing partition Wall positioned inside said bag that is more readily ruptured than the outer barrier walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall being secured to one of the outer barrier walls along a line extending. across the width of the bag and being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls along a line intermediate opposed ends-of the other of said outer barrier walls-which extends across the width of the bag so that the outer barrier walls and partition wall define adjacent sealed compartments; and a component in each of said adjacent compartments.

The invention further contemplates a compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed lower and upper outer barrier walls and at least one openend'; and a flexible, rupturahle sealing partitionwall positioned inside said bag that is more readily ruptured than the outer barrier walls'tha't'fo'rm said'bag', said'sealingpar'tition wall being secured to one of said ou'terbarrierwall's along a line intermediate opposed ends of said one" outer barrier wall which extends across the Width of the bag'and being secured to the other of said outer barriers/211s so that the sealing partition wall' divides the bag into at leasttwo com artments, each of saidcompar'tments'havirigat'lea-st one opening which may be" either at the same end of the bag-or opposed'ends" thereof as shown'in-Fignres 2 and respectively. If desired; the" bag may be provided with suitable openings along the side-s of the bag or any other suitable portion thereof.

The term component refers to materialthat'may coritain one or more constituents and thus includes any material that is'to' be retained in the compartments of the bag and adm xed Within the confines of the bag after the sealing partition wall is rupturedi In the accompanying drawings in which a few of the various embodiments of the invention are illustrated-2 Figure 1 is a plan view of a baghaving an open end;

Figure 2" is a longitudinal sectional view taken along the line 22 in Figure 1;

' Figure 3' is'a sectional view, similar to Figure 2, or a package showing the bag. illustrated in Figures 1- and 2 filled and sealed; v

Figure 4' is a transverse sectional view taken alongthe line 4'4 irrFig'ure 3;

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view, similar to 2,756,875 Patented July 31, 1956 2, Figure 2, of a second bag having opposed openends; and

Figure 6 is a sectional view, similar to Figure 3, of a package showing the bag illustrated in Figure 5 filled and sealed.

Figures- 1 and 2 illustrate one of my compartmented bags prior to beingfilled with the desired components, which comprises: a substantially fiat, rectangular, flexible compartmented bag 1 having. opposed lower and upper outer barrier walls 3 and 4, respectively, which are formed by foldingv over a single sheet of barrier material as indicated at 6 an open end 17; and a flexible, rupturable sealing partition wall 5 positioned inside the bagthat is more readily ruptured than the outer barrier walls 3 and 4, said' p'artition wall 5 being secured to the lower outer barrier wall 3 along a line 7 intermediate opposed ends of the' lower' outer barrier wall which extends across the width of the bag and being secured to the upper outer barrier wall 4' along the sides of the bag as indicated at 8 and 9. The rupturable sealing partition wall extends toward the open end 2' of the bag and divides the bag'into two compartments; as shown in Figure 2, which may be filled with their respective components through mouth openings llfand' 12 and sealed. After compartments 1 5 and 16 of the bag are filled with components Band 14, respectively, the bag may besealed by securing the'walls 3; 4, and 5 to each other at I'tl'to form the'packag'elshown in Figure 3. The sealing partition wall 5" maybe initially secured toe'i'th'er the upper" outer barrier wall 4 or lower outer barrier wall 3 and then" secured to the remaining outer barrierwall, or the outer'b'arri'er walls and sealing partition wall may be simultaneously sealed in a single operation (i. e., heat-sealed). v

Figure 4' is" a transverse sectional view" of the package taken along the line 44' in Figure 3.

Figure 5} illustrates another embodiment of my cornpartr'nented bag prior tobeing'filled with the desired compon'ent's and sealed, which comprises: a substantially flat, rectangular, flexiblecompartmentedbag 21 having opposed lower and upper outer barrier' \valls 22' and 23, resp'ec tively; opposed opening 30 and 31; a flexible, rupturable sealing partition wall 24 positioned inside the bag that is more readily ruptured than the'outer barrier'wall's 22 and 23, said'partition wall 24 being secured to the lower outer barrier wall 22 aloiig a Iine'Z'S intermediate opposed ends of the lower outer barrier wall which extends across the widthof thebag' and being secured to the upper outer barrier wall 23 along a line 26 that extends across" the width of the b'ag so that the outer barrier walls and p'arti tion wall define adjacent compartments which may be filled with their respective components through rhouth openings 30 a'nd 31' and sealed. After the compartments SZ -and 33 6fthe-bag are filledwith components 13 and 14 respec-tively, the bag may be sealed by securing'the'outer walls 22 and 24 m each other at 27 and 28 to form the package shown in Figure'6;

Th'e rupturable'=' sealingpartition wall, prior to being ruptured; serves to separate the components that are retained in thecompartrhent's The outer barrier walls'of the bag serve to retain the components within the confines ofthe: bag" until thecomponents are properly ad mixed and removal of the admixture or reaction product is desired;

In order to admiirthe components; the sealing parti tion wall is ruptured without rupturing: theu per and lower outer barrier walls, and the components are admixed by' squeezing the-bag and enclosed componentsin such a manner that the components are efiectively a'clmixed. After the components are elfectively admixedor the reaction-of the admixed components has progressed to a sat'i'sfactorypotint, the; admixture orreaction product is removed from the bag-by rupturing an outer barrier wallof the bag or by rupturing a weakened portion of the'b'ag.

Convenient and rapid mixing of the components within the confines of the bag will result if the compartments are not filled to their full capacity. It is also desirable to exclude air, especially major quantities thereof, from the interior of the sealed compartments.

The outer barrier walls and flexible, rupturable sealing partition wall may be (a) translucent or transparent, (b) of any suitable shape and formed from flexible sheet plastic material such as polyethylene, ethyl cellulose, cellulose acetate, Pliofilm (a transparent film made from chlorinated rubber), Saran (high molecular weight vinylidene chloride materials such as exemplified in U. S. Patent No. 2,160,931), Vinylite (polymerized vinyl compounds), Mylar (terephthalic acid-ethylene glycol polymer), cellophane, polyvinyl alcohol, rubber, and the like. If desired, the bag may be formed of material such as wax-coated paper, Holland cloth, and aluminum foil reinforced with paper. However, the material that is selected must be capable of adequately retaining the components within the confines of the bag. The outer walls and partition wall may be formed, if desired, of dissimilar materials.

The rupturable sealing partition wall must be more readily ruptured than the outer barrier walls. This may be accomplished by using a dilferent thickness of material or by some other weakening means. When Pliofilm is used, the material may be obtained in films of varying strengths even though the films are of equal thickness.

In the bag and corresponding package shown in Figures 1-4, the upper and lower barrier walls are secured to each other at 8 and 9; the sealing partition wall is secured to the lower barrier wall at 7, and the filled bag is sealed at 10. Figures and 6, respectively, show a bag and package in which the upper and lower barrier walls are secured to each other at the sides of the bag or package in a manner similar to that shown at 8 and 9 in Figure 4; the sealing partition wall is secured to the lower barrier wall at 25 and the upper barrier wall at 26, and the filled bag is sealed at 27 and 28. The outer barrier walls and sealing partition wall may be secured to each other by means of a suitable adhesive or by heat sealing the outer barrier walls and sealing partition wall. Pliofilm, polyethylene, Saran, and Vinylite exemplify some of the materials that may be heat-sealed. Cellophane sheets may be bonded with Duco cement (cellulose nitrate dissolved in ethyl acetate as well as minor quantities of amyl acetate, acetone, dimethyl ketone, methyl ethyl ketone; produced by E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co.), whereas sheets of Pliofilm may be bonded with Pliobond (nitrile rubber and phenol-type plastic dissolved in methyl ethyl ketone; produced by Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company, Inc.).

Although the bags and packages shown in the accompanying drawings are substantially flat and rectangular in shape, they may be of any suitable size, shape or configuration (i. e., flat and circular; cylindrical, etc.). If desired, the sealing partition wall may extend across the longest dimension of the bag or package.

As shown in Figures 2-3 and 5-6, respectively, the upper and lower outer barrier walls may be formed of a single continuous sheet of material or separate sheets. In addition, the terms lower outer barrier wall and upper outer barrier wall are intended to include side walls, barrier walls formed of a single sheet of material, or a plurality of sheets bonded or secured to each other in a suitable. manner, as well as barrier walls of any suitable shape or configuration.

The sealing partition wall 5 shown in Figures 2 and 3 may, if desired, be secured to the upper barrier wall 4 along'a line intermediate the ends of the upper barrier wall or secured to the lower barrier wall 3 (instead of the upper barrier wall) along a line intermediate the seal indicated at 7 and the open end 17 of the bag. The sealing partition wall 24 shown in Figures 5 and 6 may, if

4 desired, be secured to the upper barrier wall 23 along a line intermediate the ends of the upper barrier wall.

The above-described compartmented bag assembly may be utilized to retain or package the desired components. For example, one compartment may retain dimethyl p-toluidine plus methyl methacrylate monomer while the other compartment retains benzoyl peroxide plus methyl methacrylate polymer. Obviously, other resin components, catalysts, promotors, etc., may be packaged in our compartmented bag.

If desired, dental impression materials may also be retained in the compartmented bag in a manner similar to that which will be hereinafter described.

In the last decade, dental impression materials of the gel-forming or alginate type have come into general favor with dentists. The alginates depend upon a chemical reaction for their setting and, therefore, the various ingredients utilized in the impression composition cannot be sold in their combined or final form. Either water must be carefully measured out and added to the remaining ingredients, or water must be added to one ingredient or group of ingredients and the other ingredients retained dry and added to the aqueous ingredients. The present invention contemplates the use of pastes, each containing water and having substantially the same viscosity, maintained within a common bag but in separate portions thereof so that the dentist or other user of the impression material may carry on all of the impression-forming operations without adding any additional material to the enclosed ingredients, and, at the same time, without exposing the enclosed ingredients to the atmosphere, the hands of the user or any implement. Thus, there is no opportunity for adding too much or too little, no requirement for a mixing vessel or mixing instrument which must e cleaned, and no opportunity for contamination during mixing.

One compartment of the compartmented bag may contain a part of the impression material or gel-forming component which will be referred to sometimes as the alginate paste, while the other compartment contains a composition which will be referred to as the reactant paste.

In order to mix the materials, one of the compositions is squeezed by the hands into the other, preferably Working from opposite corners in alternation until the material has been thoroughly and rapidly mixed. The normal time limit on a dental impression material is about one minute and if the bag is filled too full or not full enough, proper mixing will not be secured within that time. As will be hereinafter pointed out, I prefer to use a dye in at least one of the components so that the amount of mixing will be well shown by the color of the components. Any unmixed portion will show either too much or too little color. The alginate paste and reactant paste are maintained apart by the rupturable sealing partition wall.

The composition of the two portions of the impression material is of great importance. The final impression inaterial must include the following:

(a) Water.

(b) A soluble alginate.

(c) A filler.

(d) A soluble reactant salt of a metal which will form an insoluble alginate.

(e) A retarder which is normally a salt capable of forming a more insoluble salt of the reactant.

It is obvious that the reactant and the retarder cannot be incorporated in the same aqueous composition. It is likewise apparent that the alginate cannot be included in an aqueous composition which includes the reactant. Likewise, the amount of water must be exactly correct to form the final impression material and the viscosities of the two compositions should be not only substantially alike, but not substantially different than the final viscosity of the mixture.

5 One of the preferred compositions comprises an alginate paste having the following composition:

1600 gms. water 4 gms. methyl parasept (a mold inhibitor) 25 gms. tetrasodium pyrophosphate (commercial), a

retarder 100 gms. potassium alginate. The preferred material is that having a viscosity of 400 centipoises and sold as 400 cps. potassium alginate 250 gms. diatomaceous earth, afiller, preferably that sold under the name HyFlo Supercel. This filler is included to give the necessary viscosity to this paste .8 gm. carmine 40, a dye This material has substantially the same viscosity as the desired mixture ready for dental use.

The second paste, which I term the reactant paste and which has substantially the same viscosity as the alginate paste, has the following preferred composition:

1200 gms. water 19 gms. ordinary commercial boricacid (HsBOs) 336 gms. calcium sulfate dihydrate purified precipitated (no heat treatment). The particular material is prepared under this name by Mallinckrodt Chemical Company.

100 gms. HyFlo Supercel '15 gms. of high viscosity carboxy methyl cellulose (Hercules) which is employed as a thickening agent-in order to give the necessary viscosity. Without this material, the calcium sulfate tends to precipitate out having at least two adjacent compartments separated by a rupturable sealing partition wall comprising: a sealed, flexible, rupturable bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls secured to each other at their respective marginal edge portions, said barrier walls having opposed marginal side and 'end portions, said bag having at least two inner adjacent sealed compartments separated by a rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier Walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of the outer barrier walls along a line extending across the width of the bag, the other opposed end portion of said partition wall being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls along a line intermediate opposed end portions of the other of the said outer barrier walls so that the contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls and sealing partition wall are contiguous and are secured to each other in sealing relationship; and a component in each of said compartments.

2. A compartmented package as set forth in claim 1 wherein the outer barrier walls are formed of plastic sheet material which permits the passage of light therethrough.

3. A compartmented package as set forth in claim 1 wherein the component in one of said adajacent'compartments is a gel-forming component and the component in the other of said adjacent compartments is 'a paste 6 capable of reacting with 'said gel-forming component to formanelastic gel which maybe used-as dental impression material 4. A compartmented package as set forth in claim I wherein each of said adjacent compartments contains a component of a polymerizable mixture so that a polymerizable mixture results when said components vare mixed within the confines of the bag.

5; A compartmented package that may be used for retaining and admixing a plurality of components having at least two adjacent compartments separated by a rupturable sealing partition wall comprising: a sealed, flexible, rupturable bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls secured to each other at their respective marginal edge portions, said barrier walls having opposed'marginal side and end portions, said bag having at least two inner adjacent sealed compartments separated by a rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall havingopposed marginal side and end portions-positioned insidesaid bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at leastone of the outer'barrier walls that formsaid bag, said sealing partition wall having-opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier Walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of the outer barrier walls along 'a line'extending across the width of the bag at an end thereof, the other opposed end portion-of said partition wall beingsecured to the other of said outer barrier walls along aline intermediate-opposed end portions of the-otherof the-said outer barrier walls so that the contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls andsealing-partition wall are contiguous and aresecured to each other in sealing relationship; and a component in each of said compartments.

-6. A-compartmented bag that'is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that-may be admixed, when desired, within the'confines'of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower andupper outer barrier walls secured to each other at marginal edge portions and-having'at least one opening, said bag having opposedvmarginal side and end portions, a flexible, rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag,'said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at'least'one of the outer barrier walls 'that'form said'bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous 'marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of saidpartition wall being secured to one of the outer barrier walls across the width of the bag along'alineintermediateopposed end portions of said one outer'barrier wall, said partition wall being secured to'the other of said outer barrier walls so that the contiguousmarginal sideportions of the outer barrier walls and sealing partition wall are contiguous and are secured to each other insealing relationship, said sealingpartition wall servingto divide the'bag into at least .two compartments,-each of'said compartments having an opening through which' a component may'be inserted into each of thecompartments.

7. A compartmented bag as set forth in claim 6 wherein the outer barrier walls-are formed of plastic sheet material-which'permits thepassage of light therethrough.

8. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls and at least one opening, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions, a flexible,

rupturable, compartment forming, sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag which are secured to marginal portions of the bag, said partition wall-"having' -a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of the outer barrier walls across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, said partition wall being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls so that the sealing partition wall divides the bag into at least two compartments, each of said compartments having an opening through which a component may be inserted into each of the compartments.

9. A compartmented bag as set forth in claim 8 wherein the outer barrier walls are formed of plastic sheet material which permits the passage of light therethrough.

10. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls and at least one opening, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions, a flexible, rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall having marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag which are secured to marginal portions of the bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier Walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier Walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of said outer barrier walls across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, said partition wall being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls so that the sealing partition wall divides the bag into at least two compartments, said compartments having adjacent openings through which a component may be inserted into each of the compartments.

ll. A compartmented bag as set forth in claim 10 wherein the outer barrier walls are formed of plastic sheet material which permits the passage of light therethrough.

12. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls and at least one opening, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions, a flexible,

rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall having marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag which are secured to marginal portions of the bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are substantially contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of said outer barrier walls substantially across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, said partition wall being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls so that the sealing partition wall divides the bag into at least two compartments, each of said compartments having an opening at opposed ends of the bag through which a component may be inserted into each of the compartments.

13. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls and at least one opening, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions a flexible, rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition Wall having marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag which are secured to marginal portions of the bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with and secured to opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier Walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of said outer barrier walls across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, the other opposed end portion of said partition wall being secured to the other of said outer barrier walls along a line extending across the width of the bag so that the sealing partition wall divides the bag into at least two compartments, each of said compartments having an opening through which a component may be inserted into each of the compartments.

14. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper barrier walls and at least one opening, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions, a flexible, rupturable, compartment-forming, sealing partition wall having marginal side and end portions positioned inside the bag which are secured to marginal portions of the bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier Walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with opposed, contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to one of said outer barrier walls across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, the other opposed end portion of said partition wall being secured to the other of the said outer, barrier walls along a line extending across the width of the bag at an end thereof so that the outer barrier walls and partition wall define adjacent compartments, each of said compartments having an opening through which a component may be inserted into each of the compartments.

15. A compartmented bag that is suitable for retaining a plurality of components that may be admixed, when desired, within the confines of the bag comprising: a flexible bag having opposed, similarly-shaped upper and lower i outer barrier walls and an opening at an end thereof, said bag having opposed marginal side and end portions, a flexible, rupturable, sealing partition Wall having marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than at least one of the outer barrier walls that form said bag, said sealing partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are contiguous with and secured to opposed,

contiguous marginal side portions of the outer barrier walls, one end portion of said partition wall being secured to the lower outer barrier wall across the width of the bag along a line intermediate opposed end portions of the lower outer barrier wall, said partition wall being secured to the upper and lower outer barrier walls along opposed, contiguous side portions of the bag, said rupturable sealing partition wall extending toward said open end of the bag and dividing the bag into two compartments, each of which may be filled with a desired component at said open end.

16. A compartmented package that may be used for retaining and admixing a plurality of components having at least two adjacent compartments separated by a rupturable sealing partition wall comprising: a sealed, flex- I ible, rupturable bag having opposed, similarly-shaped lower and upper outer barrier walls secured to each other at their respective marginal edge portions, said barrier walls having opposed marginal side and end portions,

said bag having at least two inner adjacent sealed compartments separated by a rupturable, compartment-forming, partition wall having opposed marginal side and end portions positioned inside said bag, said partition wall having a lower rupturing strength than said bag, said partition wall having opposed marginal side portions that are secured to at least one of the outer barrier walls substantially adjacent to opposed, marginal side portions of the bag, one marginal end portion of said partition wall be ing secured to one of the outer barrier walls intermediate opposed end portions of said one outer barrier wall, the other opposed marginal end portion of said partition wall being secured to an outer barrier wall so that opposed marginal end portions and side portions of said partition wall are secured to at least one of said outer barrier walls,

thereby forming at least two sealed compartments which 15 2687130 are separated by said common partition wall; and a component in each of said compartments.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,334,138 Dorgan Mar. 16, 1920 1,810,649 Elliott June 16, 1931 2,249,694 Wilding July 15, 1941 2,397,144 Molnar Mar. 26, 1946 2,401,110 Rohdin May 28, 1946 2,477,912 Vallandigham Aug. 2, 1949 2,562,402 Winsten July 31, 1951 2,601,703 Sawyer July 1, 1952 Cohen Aug. 24, 1954

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/219, 62/530, 229/72
International ClassificationB65D81/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3266
European ClassificationB65D81/32H1