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Publication numberUS2757401 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1956
Filing dateJul 12, 1950
Priority dateJul 12, 1950
Publication numberUS 2757401 A, US 2757401A, US-A-2757401, US2757401 A, US2757401A
InventorsPeterson Ruben O
Original AssigneeOsborn Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary brush construction
US 2757401 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. o. PETEmmN @MVA-ll ROTARY BRUSH CONSTRUCTION Aug. 7, 113% Filed July l2. 1950 United States Patent O ROTARY BRUSH CONSTRUCTION Ruben U. Peterson, University Heights, Ollio, assignorto The sborn Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ulno, a corporation ot Ohio Application `lluly 12, 1950, Serial No. 173,464 lll Claims. (Cl. 18`2) This invention relates as indicated to rotary brush construction and, more particularly, to a preassembled rotary brush unit adapted to be mounted upon an arbor or mandrel and readily removed therefrom when it is desired to replace the same.

Power driven rotary brushes mounted upon shafting are commonly employed for a wide variety of purposes including the surface conditioning of metal sheets and the like and some such brushes, commonly cylindrical in form and known as roller brushes, are quite large and heavy. They may be comprised of a number of annular brush sections assembled in close side-by-side relationship or a relatively long length of helically wound brush strip may be utilized. ln the latter case, the Same may be wound upon a tubular core ladapted closely to tit a relatively large diameter arbor or to be supported upon a relatively small diameter arbor by means of annular adapters. rthe assembly and disassembly of such brushes has always constituted something of a problem when it is desired to replace a worn-out brush with a new brush or to substitute a different size brush on the arbor. ln my co-pending application Serial No. 732,445, tiled March 5, i947, now Patent No. 2,609,559, I disclose a novel form of rotary brush including retaining means considerably simplifying the mounting and replacement of this type of brush while at the same time providing a very strong assembly adapted to withstand high speed operation and the stresses and strains to which the same is subjected in use.

It is a principal object of this present invention to provide a replaceable pre-assembled brush unit which may be quickly installed `and removed without diiculty and without the necessity of employing special tools,

Another object is to provide means whereby helically wound brush strip is permanently secured to a tubular core for mounting as a unit on either a large or small diameter arbor.

Still another object is to provide such brush unit adapted to be mounted upon and driven by a variety of difierent types of arbors including square, polygonal and round arbors.

A further object is to provide such brush unit which is designed for passage of a fluid, either gaseous or liquid therethrough for cooling and other purposes.

Other objects of my invention will appear as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description and the annexed drawing setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

In said annexed drawing:

Fig. l is an end elevational view of another rotary brush unit embodying the principles of my invention;

2,757,401 Patented Aug. 7, i956 Ace Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 on Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is -a fragmentary sectional View taken along the line 3 3 on Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of the tubular core of the brush of Fig. l;

Fi 5 is a transverse sectional View through a circular arbor and such core mounted thereon;

Fig. 6 is a view resembling Fig. 5 but showing such core mounted on a diiierent type of arbor; and

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 5 but showing such core mounted on a substantially square arbor.

1Referring now more particularly to said annexed drawing and especially Figs. 1-3 thereof, the brush construe tion there illustrated comprises a cylindrical sheet metal core 23 having a length of helically wound brush strip 2 seated thereon. Such brush strip may desirably be of the general type illustrated and described in my Patent No. 2,303,386 having a sheet metal channel form base 3 and stranded brush material 4 doubled and retained therein beneath an elongated retaining element such as wire 5. Such wire in turn may be secured in place by means of overlapping teeth 6 punched in from the respective sides oi' channel 3. Other types of brush strip having brush backs similar to channel 3 are well known in the art and may likewise be employed in the construction of this invention.

l prefer to form such core of two identical stampings, each making up one-half of the cylindrical core. .Each such stamping is of general semi-circular crosssection formed with an inwardly protruding rib 24 en tending longitudinally thereof midway of its width. A complementary groove 2:3 is thus formed externally of such rib. The longitudinal edge portions of Such stamping are offset inwardly and such edge portions of two opposed stampings joined as by spot welding to form in wardly protruding ribs 26 similar in size and conforma` tion to ribs 24, with `complementary grooves 27 externally thereof similar to grooves 25.

Slots 28 are formed in the ends member thus obtained intermediate such ribs 24 and 26 for a purpose to be explained below. A helically wound length of brush strip generally indicated at 2 is now tightly seated on the outer periphery of such core 23 and the outermost turn (or, if desired, several turns) is welded to such core, preferably by arc welding, through such slots 28.

of the tubular core being adapted engagement.

considerable difficulty has been met with due to the tendency of the brush core to bind thereon, The provision of longitudinally extending ribs 24 and 26 entirely eliminates this problem, such ribs serving as runners and greatly reducing the area of the contacting surfaces. A plurality of spaced holes may be provided in core 23 to permit the radial outward ilow of air or other fluid media to the brush element mounted thereon.

It'will be seen from the foregoing that l have provided an improved brush construction whereby a helically wound length rof brush strip may be mounted on a generally cylindrical core and made integral therewith so that the brush may be handled as a unit even when of very large size. The advantages of this arrangement, particularly over that usually employed where the helically wound brush strip is mounted directly on the arbor, have been explained above. From a practical operating point of view, the fact that brushes of this type may be removed and replaced upon their arbors with a minimum of down time has been found to be of very great value.

It will, of course, be understood that the term brush as used herein and in the claims is intended to include closely related articles such as rotary buffs, the particular filler material not constituting any part of the present invention. Helically wound brush strip manufactured in accordance with my prior Patent 2,303,386, for example, is relatively inexpensive of manufacture, as are also the stampings such as core members 23. When rigidly assembled, as by Welding, a complete brush unit is produced at low cost which nevertheless will withstand diicult operating conditions. Generally at annular end members may be mounted on the arbor to either side of the brush unit of Figs. 1 and 2 or secured thereto by welding. intermediate turns of the helical brush strip may be welded to the generally cylindrical core through holes in core 23. This is often desirable in the case of relatively long roller brushes. Reference may be had to my copending divisional application Serial No. 561,446, filed January 26, 1956, for another form of brush assembly which is particularly advantageous where it is desired to mount an annular rotary brush unit of large inner diameter on an arbor which may be of relatively small diameter.

Other modes of applying the principle of the invention may be employed, change being made as regards the details described, provided the features stated in any of the following claims or the equivalent of such be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

l. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and a helically wound length of brush strip having a metal back seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising two opposed identical sheet metal stampings of general half-circular cross-section with inwardly offset longitudinal edge portions overlapping and welded together, thereby providing two diametrically opposite inwardly protruding ribs, inwardly protruding longitudinally extending ribs of like dimensions formed in each of said stampings midway between said first-named ribs, said ribs being adapted to engage and seat upon an arbor inserted axially within said core, slots in the ends of said core, weld metal in said slots securing such metal back firmly to Said core, and openings through the wall of said core adapted to permit radially outward iiow of iluid entering said core axially into the spaces between said core and such arbor.

2. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and a helically wound length of brush strip having a metal back seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising two opposed identical sheet metal stamp ings of general half-circular cross-section with inwardly offset longitudinal edge portions overlapping and welded together, thereby providing two diametrically opposite A inwardly protruding ribs, inwardly protruding longitudinally extending ribs of like dimensions formed in each of said stampings midway between said first-named ribs, said ribs being adapted to engage and seat upon an arbor inserted within said core, the end turns of such helically wound brush strip metal back being welded to said core.

3. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising two opposed identical sheet metal stampings of general halfcircular cross-section with inwardly offset longitudinal edge portions overlapping and welded together, thereby providing two diametrically opposite inwardly protruding ribs, inwardly protruding longitudinally extending ribs of like dimensions formed in each of said stampings midway between said first-named ribs, said ribs being adapted to engage and seat upon an arbor inserted within said core.

4. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising a sheet metal cylinder having a plurality of inwardly projecting exposed ribs of substantial width formed therein by deformation of the sheet metal of said cylinder and extending generally parallel to the axis thereof adapted directly to engage and seat upon a power driven shaft inserted co-axially within said core.

5. A rotary brush unit comprising a generally cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising a unitary cylinder having a plurality of radially uniform ribs projecting inwardly from its inner periphery and extending generally parallel to the axis thereof, said ribs being exposed and circumferentially spaced to engage and seat uniformly upon a rotary shaft inserted co-axially within said core.

6. An annular rotary brush comprising a generally cylindrical core with brush material extending radially outwardly therefrom, said core having rigid ribs exposed on its inner periphery extending generally parallel to the axis thereof circumferentially spaced to engage a shaft inserted co-axially within said core and iirmly seat thereon, a shaft thus fitted in said core, and means on said shaft engaging at least one said rib to drive said core and brush therewith.

7. A rotary brush unit comprising a tubular metal core, a length of helically wound brush strip having a metal back seated on said core with brush material extending radially therefrom, the end turns of said helically wound brush back being locally welded to said core, and circumferentially spaced rigid internal projections on said core extending generally parallel to the axis thereof and exposed to engage circumferentially spaced regions of the peripheral surface of an arbor to support said unit centered thereon.

8. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising a cylinder having a plurality of circumferentially spaced rigid ribs projecting inwardly from its inner periphery and extending generally parallel to the axis of said core, and an arbor of non-circular cross-section firmly seating said core with said ribs both drivingly engaging said arbor and also spacing the body of said core therefrom.

9. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially therefrom, said core comprising two opposed identical sheet metal stampings of general halfcircular cross-section with inwardly oifset longitudinal edge portions circumferentially overlapping and joined together, thereby providing two exposed diametrically opposite inwardly protruding ribs, inwardly protruding longitudinally extending ribs of like dimensions formed in each of said stampngs midway between said rstnamed ribs, said ribs being exposed to engage and seat upon an arbor inserted within said core.

10. A rotary brush unit comprising a cylindrical core and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially outwardly therefrom, said core comprising a sheet metal cylinder having a plurality of exposed inwardly projecting ribs of substantial width formed therein by deformation of the sheet metal of said cylinder extending generally parallel to the axis thereof and circumferentially spaced to seat said core upon a power driven shaft inserted axially within said core, said cylindrical core also having apertures therethrough for passage of uid from the interior to the exterior thereof.

11. A rotary brush unit comprising a rigid generally cylindrical core, and an annular brush element seated on the outer periphery of said core with brush material extending generally radially outwardly therefrorn, said core comprising a sheet metal cylinder having a plurality of inwardly projecting ribs of substantial width formed therein by deformation of the sheet metal of said cylinder and exposed in the central opening of the latter for driven engagement with a shaft of non-circular cross-section inserted co-axially therein.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US721263 *Nov 14, 1898Feb 24, 1903Bernard F SeadlerPolishing-brush.
US1199780 *Oct 20, 1915Oct 3, 1916Ralph B GoodrichRotary brush.
US1800376 *Nov 11, 1929Apr 14, 1931Milwaukee Brush Mfg CompanyRotary brush
US2191115 *Dec 24, 1936Feb 20, 1940Osborn Mfg CoVentilated rotary brush
US2303386 *May 14, 1940Dec 1, 1942Osborn Mfg CoBrush and method of making same
US2349643 *Sep 7, 1940May 23, 1944Spiral Brushes IncBrush construction
US2379205 *Sep 12, 1942Jun 26, 1945Spiral Brushes IncBrush construction and mounting therefor
US2409309 *May 6, 1943Oct 15, 1946Osborn Mfg CoRotary brush
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2921328 *Jul 29, 1955Jan 19, 1960Osborn Mfg CoRotary brush with fluid passages
US3002212 *Jul 2, 1959Oct 3, 1961Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoInterlocked strip brush for all fill materials
US3107381 *Jul 1, 1959Oct 22, 1963Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoCorrugated tube for rotary brushes
US3321799 *May 14, 1964May 30, 1967Hackworth Lloyd GRotary brush
US3855659 *Dec 4, 1972Dec 24, 1974Grambor SRotary brooms
US4490872 *May 11, 1984Jan 1, 1985Drumm Arthur ESpiral brush section
US4490877 *Nov 20, 1983Jan 1, 1985Drumm Arthur ESpiral brush section
US5016311 *Feb 5, 1990May 21, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyApparatus and brush segment arrangement for finishing wheel brushes; and method
US5083840 *Mar 4, 1991Jan 28, 1992Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod of preparing an industrial cylinder brush arrangement for operation
US5233719 *Apr 3, 1992Aug 10, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Co.Apparatus and brush segment arrangement for finishing wheel brushes
US6295687Aug 17, 1999Oct 2, 2001Michael Glenn DehartBuff section assembly and method of making
US8065771 *Apr 2, 2008Nov 29, 2011Hui Wing-KinPool cleaning brush
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/182
International ClassificationA46B13/00, A47L9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA46B13/003, A47L9/0477
European ClassificationA46B13/00B2, A47L9/04E2C