Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2757668 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1956
Filing dateFeb 2, 1953
Priority dateFeb 7, 1952
Publication numberUS 2757668 A, US 2757668A, US-A-2757668, US2757668 A, US2757668A
InventorsEmanuel Meyer-Saladin Oskar
Original AssigneeEmanuel Meyer-Saladin Oskar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the cleansing treatment of parts of the body
US 2757668 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 7, 1956 o MEYER-SALADIN 2,757,668

APPARATUS FOR THE CLEANSING TREATMENT OF PARTS OF THE BODY Filed Feb. 2, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORI AR EmAHuEL ms -SALAO|H g- 7, 1956 o, E, MEYER-SALADIN 2,

APPARATUS FOR THE CLEANSING TREATMENT OF PARTS OF THE BODY Filed Feb. 2, 1953 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 iNVENTORI OsKAR EMANUEL MEYER- SALADIN Aug. 7, 1956 o. E. MEYER-SALADIN 2,757,668

APPARATUS FOR THE CLEANSING TREATMENT OF PARTS OF THE BODY Filed Feb. 2, 1953 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 A 86 s s w \ll ikl.

INVENTOR; osKAR EmAn UEL MEvE -snmmn BY 1 United States Patent APPARATUS FOR THE CLEANSING TREATMENT OF PARTS OF THE BODY Oskar Emanuel Meyer-Saladin, Basel, Switzerland Application February 2, 1953, Serial No. 334,446 Claims priority, appliiation Switzerland February 7, 1952 9 Claims. (Cl. 128-1731) The present invention relates to an apparatus for the cleansing treatment of parts of the body, more especially of teeth and mucous membranes of the mouth, which is characterized by the fact that it comprises a device for the production of carbon dioxide in statu nascendi and at least one orifice for the ejection of a spray, which contains the carbon dioxide at the latest upon impinging on the surface to be treated. With suitable construction, such an apparatus is particularly suitable for the treatment of teeth and mucous membranes of the mouth, when it is a question of removing this coating of mucus, which, as is known, is sticky and which forms a breeding place for all possible harmful bacteria, and particularly at places which are only accessible with difliculty, for example, at the tooth stem and between the teeth. A sufiicient removal of this film of mucus is not possible with the purely mechanical means already known, more especially the conventional tooth brush; and moreover, the auxiliary means, such as tooth pastes, tooth powders and tooth washes, used therewith, do not provide the satisfactory cleaning of the teeth which is expected of them. It is also known to employ means which can be introduced, inter alia, also in the form of a spray issuing from a nozzle, inter alia, produced by a jet of carbon dioxide, but as such means depend on industrially supplied carbon dioxide in special gas bottles, they are in practice used only by dentists while they are not sutficient for eliminating the film of mucus.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a way not only for carrying out this dental treatment more quickly and efiiciently, but which, with suitable instruction, can also be made available for use by private persons for private requirements.

The use of the apparatus of the invention is not restricted to the mouth cavity, but is also possible in gynecology and balneology.

It is to be borne in mind that the carbon dioxide adapted to be brought to the place of use is much more suitable and elfective for the present purpose than ordinary carbon dioxide, such as can be obtained, for example, from the commercially available carbon dioxide bottles. By suitable construction of the apparatus of the invention and suitable choice of the chemical components from which the carbon dioxide is produced, it is also possible by selective and successive treatment of the surfaces by these components alone to produce a more eifective treatment or initial treatment, so that to a limited extent it results in a formation of carbon dioxide in statu nascendi at the immediate place of use, that is to say, on the surface which is to be treated itself, the said surface being still covered by the component previously used when the second co ponent is subsequently applied to the surface.

Some embodiments of the invention are shown by way of example in the accompanying drawing in which:

Figure 1 shows a vertical central longitudinal section taken through a complete apparatus constructed accordso KB ing to one embodiment, and is partly in diagrammatic form, with a shut-off valve shown in the closed position.

Figure 2 is a cross-section on the line II-II of Figure 1.

Figure 3 shows the part of the shut-off valve shown in Figure 1 in the open position.

Figure 4 shows a specific form of the handle of the apparatus with a hollow brush removed.

Figures 5 to 8 respectively show a cross-section on the lines VV, VI-VI, VII-VII and VIII-VIII of Figure 4.

Figure 9 is a view of the hollow brush.

Figure 10 is a plan view thereof.

Figure 11 is a view of the handle of another embodiment, the handle being connected to a supply hose.

Figure 12 is a similar View of the front portion of the orifice member but with the casing removed.

Figure 13 shows the conical casing therefor, by itself and in axial longitudinal section.

Figure 14 shows to a larger scale a cross-section on the line XIVXIV of Figure 12.

Figures 15 and 16 respectively show a cross-section on the lines XV-XV and XVI-XVI of Figure 14.

Figure 17 is a view in the direction of arrow A of Figure 16.

As will be seen from Figure 1, an apparatus according to the invention comprises a stationary housing which is provided with an upper triangular flange 1 and a lower rectangular flange 2 which form the rearward closure of the housing and which are provided with bores 3 by means of which the housing can be screwed on to a wall. The housing comprises a tank 4 for gas under pressure, said tank being connected through a non-return valve to a hand pump 5 which serves to produce the gas under pressure. The hand pump is in the form of a conventional hand-operated piston pump, such as is used, for example, as a bicycle pump. The non-return valve has a conical seating 6 in a short pipe 7 projecting into the tank 4. Cooperating with the valve seating 6 is a valve ball 8 which is urged against the seating 6 by spring means, such as a compression spring 9, held under the required initial tension by a grub screw 10 screwed into the pipe section 7. The pipe-section is formed with apertures 11 which open into the tank 4.

' It is obvious that any other suitable valve, for example a conventional tire Valve as used with bicycle and motorcar inner tubes, can be employed instead of the valve which is illustrated. The housing section 12 the tank 4 is in the form of a horizontal plate 13, which, together with the y, the 'manner of a fitted lid. Disposed between the edge: of the container 14 and the plate is a packing ring 15 of elastically yieldable material. As will be seen fIOlll. Figures 1 and 2, the casing of the container is providedi with three projections 16 which project radially outwards and which each engage in an annular groove formed in the inside of the ring 13. This groove has a horizontal portion 17 and a vertical portion 18, which latter is led up to the free edge of the ring. These portions 17 and 18 together with the projection 16 form a bayonet joint which, in the engaging position illustrated, urges the edge of the container 14 hermetically against the packing ring 15.

Arranged inside the container 14 are two fitted cups 19 and 20 which are semi-circular in cross-section and which are seated in the container with only small clearance and with their flat boundary surfaces bearing freely one against the other. They are disposed with their bases on the bottom of the container and are of such a length that their edge with the opening is pressed against the packing ring 15.

Patented Aug. 7, 1956 adjoining; which is. provided with a downwardly projecting annular holder' plate section enclosed therethen surrounds the upper part of a container 14 in:

The flat boundary walls of thetwo cups are provided in their upper portions with orifices 21 adjoining one another.

The part 12 of the housing comprises a horizontal duct .22 whichopens at one end into the tank 4 and at the other end into a vertical bore into which is tightly fitted a pipe 23. The pipe 23 extends through the housing wall 24 of a shut-off valve, the plug 25 of which is provided at this point with openings which can be seen in Figure 1. The housing 24 is perforated by a connecting pipe 26 on the diametrically opposed side of the plug 25. In addition, a pipe 27 is connected to the valve at an angle to the pipe 23, this pipe 27 being led through an opening in the housing part 12 and the washer 15 and opening into the uppermost part of the cup .19.

The part 12 of the housing is formed with two further vertical bores, through each of which is passed a liquid pipe 28, 29. The pipe 28 dips in the form of a riser into the cup 19 and terminates close above the bottom of the latter In a similar manner, the liquid pipe 29 is immersed as a riser in the cup 20. The pipes 28 and 29 are passed through the housing wall 24 of the same valve as the gas pipe 23 but at an axially displaced position of this valve, at which the plug 25 has the shape which is shown inFigure l and which has eccentrically disposed ,passages 30 and 31 respectively. Simply for the purpose of clearer representation, three separate valves or cocks are shown diagrammatically in Figure 1. In actual fact, it is only necessary to use one and the same shutoff valve, having ditferent cross-sections at axially spaced positions. However, there is nothing to prevent three separate shut-off valves being provided in accordance with the layout according to Figure 3, instead of a common plug 25. In alignment with the pipe 28 on the opposite side of the valve is a liquid pipe 32, and connected in a similar manner in alignment with the pipe 29is a liquid pipe 33. As will be seen, all the pipes are closed when the plug 25 is in the position shown in Figure 1. However, if the plug 25 is turned through 90 in the direction of the arrow so that it assumes the position shown in Figure 3, then the pipes 23, 26 and 27 for the gas under pressure are connected with one another. Furthermore, the liquid pipe 28 is connected by the duct 30 with the liquid pipe 32. Similarly, the liquid pipe 29 is connected by the duct 31 with the liquid pipe 33. The pipe 26 is connected at its other end to a chamber 34 which is disposed in a hollow handle 35 and is forked into two mixing chambers 36 and 37. Each mixing chamber 36 comprises a discharge orifice constructed as an injector nozzle 38, 39, said said-nozzles leading into a combined mixture chamber 40 formed by the conically terminating portion of the handle element 35. Connected to the conical portion of the handle element 35, is an outlet tube 41 to which there is detachably secured, by means of a bayonet joint 43, a hollow brush 42 intended for operating on the surface to be treated.

Located in each of the liquid pipes 32 and 33 is a flow control member which is adapted to be operated by the pressure of a finger on a button 44, 45 against the influence of a return spring 46 in each case. The return springs 46 are each disposed in a transverse duct which crosses the pipe 32 or 33 and are mounted at one end on the nozzle and at the other end against the inner end of a control slide 47, 48 which is displaceable 'longitudinally in the transverse bore. The control slide 47 carries the button or knob 44 at its free end and is provided with a control bore 49 parallel to the pipe 32. In a similar manner, the control slide 48 carries .the knob 45 at its free end and has a control bore 50.

In the position shown in Figure l, the control slides 47 and 48 are disposed in the closed position which is ensured by the force of the return springs in which position the pipes 32 and 33 are completely shut ofi. By

pressing on the knob 44, the control slide 47 is displaced towards the right so that the control bore 49 uncovers the passage through the pipe 32. When the knob 44 is in the fully pressed-in position, the entire cross-section of the pipe is uncovered by the bore 49. The same result is obtained with the controlslide 48 upon pressing in the knob 45, as regards the pipe 33 and the control bore 50.

The end of the pipe 32 which is connected to the control member is introduced into the single mixing chamber 36 of the handle element 35 and is constructed as ,an injector nozzle 51. In a similar manner, that end of the pipe 33 following the control member is introduced into the single mixing chamber 37 and formed as an injester nozzle 52.

in Figure l, the control member and the liquid pipes 32 and 33, and the pressure gas pipe 26 are only shown diagrammatically. In practice, in the particular embodiment, as will be seen from Figures 4 to 10, the control members and all the pipes are fitted into the handle element 35, the two control members being staggered and arranged turned by relatively to one another, so that the control slide 47 in the position shown in Figure 4 is adapted to be pushed inwardly by pressure acting in the transverse direction, whereas the control slide 48 is adapted to be forced in by a force on the knob 45 which encloses an angle of 90 with the direction of the control slide 47. As shown in Figure 4, the handle element is constructed as an elongated part of the apparatus which is adapted to be gripped in the hand of the operator and comprises, considered in the direction of flow, the forward end of the apparatus including the two control members, which are so arranged that each control member is disposed in a region suitable for the operating finger of the hand gripping the handle element. By suitable choice of dimensions, the operation of the control members can easily be efiected by the thumb and index finger or middle finger of the hand gripping the handle element. As will be seen from Figure 4, the part of the apparatus connected to the handle element 35 is formed as a flexible tubular element 53, for example, in the form of a hose, which encloses the pressure gas pipe 26 and the two liquid pipes 32 and 33. The connection part 54 can be made in the form of a nut or bayonet joint or the like so that the handle element is connected with the tubular element 53 in a readily detachable manner.

Inuse, the container 14 is first of all turned manually in the direction of the arrow shown in Figure 2 until the projections 16 pass into the vertical groove 18, whereby the bayonet joint is released and the container can be drawn downwardly together with the cups l9 and 20 located therein. An acid-containing liquid component is then introduced into one cup, for example into the cup 19, while a basic liquid component containing a carbonate or bicarbonate is introduced into the other cup 20. The acid-containing component may for example contain tartaric acid or lactic acid, and also a fruit aroma and a sweetening substance, and perhaps also a vitamin supplement, more especially vitamin C. The basic component may contain sodium bicarbonate or sodium carbonate, perhaps mixed with suitable aromatic substances. The container 14 with the cups is then fitted again by operating the bayonet joint. The shut-0E valve 24, 25 isdisposed in the closed. position illustrated in Figure l. The-pressure gas, for example compressed air, is next produced -by operating the pump 5, until the tank 4 has the required pressure. The plug 25 of the shut-otf member is then rotated intothe open position shown in Figure 3, ao-that first of all gas under pressure passes into the space disposed above the liquid in the cup 19 by way of the passage 22, pipe 23 and pipe 27. Owing to the provision of the openings 21, the space above the liquid in thecup 20. is also filled with gas under pressure, so that the acid liquid component can pass into thepipe 32 by way'of the pipe 28 and the duct 30, but imp! vented from fiowingthrough the control member 47 which is in the closed position. The basic liquid component, which ,canpass .by way of the rising pipe 29 and the duct '31 into the pipe 33, behaves in a similar manchambers 36 and 37,

2,757,e es

ner, but is prevented from flowing through member 48 whichis in the shut-ofl position. M On the contrary, the pressure gas pipe 26 is completely open after the shut-ofi'member 24, 25 has been opened, so that gas under pressure can pass through the pipe 26 and through the chamber 34 into the two separate mixing and through the injector, nozzles 38 and 39, the combined mixing space 40, the outlettube 41 and the hollow brush 42 to atmosphere. Disposed in the vicinity of the nozzles 38 and 39 are air-holes 55, which permit the entrance into the combined mixing chamber 40 of outside air which is drawn in by injector action.

The operator then grips the handle element, and ad vauces .it 'to the surface to be treated with the hollow brush 42 or with the outlet tube 41 when the brush is removed. At the same time, he pushes in the pressbutton 44 so that the acid liquid component can flow through the pipe 32 and pass through the nozzle 51 into the single mixing chamber 36 which is in communication by means of openings 56 with the outside air so that outside air can be drawn in at the same time by the injector action. The liquid is atomised in contact with the pres sure gas flowing through the mixing chamber 36 and converted into a fine spray which passes through the injector nozzle 38, the chamber 40, the outlet pipe 41 and brush 42 to the place where it is to be used and there effects a loosening and partial washing-away of the mucous layer covering surface. p

At the same time, the operator can with the other hand draw the lips somewhat away from the teeth so that all places can be covered by the brush, which is moved accordingly; As a result of the pressure, the spray also reaches the gum cavities and the interstices of the teeth the control which are only accessible with difiicult y. The spray removes the chemically dissolved parts of mucous form, the fine bubbles of the spray being charged with the dissolved mucousparticles and carrying these away.

Thereafter, the press-button 45 is also pressed in, this" permitting the flow of the basic liquid component through the pipe 33. The said component passes through the nozzle 52 into the single mixing chamber 37 which is in communication by means of openings 57 with the outside air fordrawing in supplementary air by injector action. The basic spray is now formed in the single mixing chamher 37, said spray issuing by way of the injector nozzle 39 and impinging on the acid spray leaving the injector nozzle 38. By contact of the two sprays, there .takes place a decomposition of the carbonate or bicarbonate of the basic component by the acid of the acid component, which leads to the formation of carbondioxide in suitable quantities. This carbondioxide is led immediately after it is formed or while it is being formed through the combined mixing chamber 40, the outlet pipe 41 and the brush 42 to the place of use, or perhaps is only formed at the said place. The cleaning of the surfaces to be treated is completed with this carbon-dioxide spray. Thereafter, by releasing the press-button 44, the acid component must be shut-off and a subsequent neutralisation of the treated surfaces of all acid residues must be produced with the basic component alone. By this means," a salivation is produced in the mouth which encloses and protects the teeth. This basic saliva prevents the growth of harmful bacteria. i

. There is nothing to prevent the treatment being carried out with the brush 42 removed or alternately with the i brush and without the brush.

In contrast to the arrangement shown in the drawing, it is possible 'in a particular construction to dispense with the foremost conical position of the handle element 35 so that the injector nozzles 38 and 39 lead directly into atmosphere and can be brought directly to the place of treatment. v The effect obtained in this manneris that the carbon dioxide is formed directly at the place where it is used or directly before impinging thereon. I Iere also It is not absolutely necesary,"to fit the brush 42 in the I form of a hollow brush directly on the outlet pipe 41 as shown in Figure 1. It is, in fact, also readily possible for a brush having a handle of suitable length of be detachably fitted on the handle element adjacent the outlet pipe 41. For this purpose, the handle element may for example be provided with a suitable bore which is par allel to the outlet pipe 41 and which does not extend into the housing, or with clips in which the handle of the hand brush is adapted to be fitted as a tight fit. Preferably, the hollow brush is so constructed and arranged that it is disposed in the immediate vicinity of the orifice of the discharge pipe 41 or that the outlet pipe 41 extends into the brush between the bristles thereof so that the spray issuing from the said'pipe 41 reaches that region of the object undergoing treatment which is operated on by the bristles.

In contrast to the arrangement shown in Figure l, the pump and "vessel assembly or, with omission of the pump, the vessel assembly including the shut-off valves can be provided with a base instead of with a device for hanging it on the wall, said base enabling the apparatus to be set up directly on a table.

As will be seen from Figure 11, the foremost part of the apparatus, considered in the direction of flow, is formed with a handle element 61 adapted to be gripped by the hand of the operator as in the preceding construction. The part of the apparatus connected to'the handle element 61 is'again formed as a flexible pipe element 53 which is in the form of a hose and which encloses two liquid pipes 32 and 33 and the pressure gas pipe 26. The two liquid pipes 32 and 33 and the pressure pipe 26 may each be fed by a liquid container or a source of pressure gas, in the same manner as indicated in Figure 1, but each pipe will comprise a separate shut-off member so that it can be independently regulated and shut-off.

In the present case, flow-control members in the handle element itself are dispensed with, although there is nothing to prevent such flow-control members from shutting-cit and regulating at least one liquid pipe being provided in the handle element. I

According to Figure 11 of the drawing, the three pipes 26, 32 and 33 are shown purely diagrammatically as being connected to a longitudinal bore provided in the handle element 61. The longitudinal bore following the pressure gas pipe 26 in the handle element forms the pipe 62, whereas the longitudinal bores connected to the liquid pipes 32 and 33 form the pipes 63 and 64 respectively. All pipes extend parallel to one another longitudinally of the handle, the two liquid pipes 63 and 64 being disposed symmetricallyof the radial axial plane XVI-XVI passing through the axis of the pressure gas pipe 62, as shown in Figure 14.

As will now 'be seen more particularly from Figure 12,

' the discharge end of the handle element 61 is conical and narrow cone, "are indicated by reference 62, 63 and 64'.

As will now be seen more especially from Figures 15 to 17, the cone 65 is formed with a longitudinal groove following each pipe outlet. The longitudinal groove following the outlet 62' is indicated at 66 (see Figures 16 and 17). The longitudinal grooves following the openings 63' and 64 are indicated at 67 and 68 respectively in Figure 15. The longitudinal grooves 66, 67 and 68 extend asfar as the free end of the cone 65 and are shown excessively deep for the purpose of better illustration in the drawing. In actual fact, groove depths of the order of size of a tenth of a millimetre'are sufficient for practical requirements.

As will be seen from Figure 11, the cone 65 is now enclosed by a conical casing 69 having thesame eonicity, said casing bcingshown in Figure 13. For the purpose of securing the conical casiug 69, the cone is provided with a threaded extension (Figure 12) at a point disposed in front of the pipe openings 62', 63', 64/, when considered in the direction of flow, the conical casing 69 formed with a female thread 71 at the base end being screwed on to said extension 70. In Figure 13, the conical casing is shown bearing flush on a shoulder 72 of the handle element directly below the thread 70. In this position, the inside of the conical casing bears without play on the cone 65, so that each groove 66, 67 or 68 of the cone is limited on the outside directly by-the position of the conical casing 69 which faces it, and each groove forms with the corresponding part, of the conical casing a nozzle duct which leads to atmosphere. The outlets 62', 63 and 64' are closed by those parts of the conical casing 69 which are opposite them, so that therefore the pipes 62, 63 and 64 open directly into the corresponding nozzle ducts.

If the conical casing 69 is now turned in the unscrewing direction relativelyto the cone 63, this results in an axial displacement of the conical casing 69 forwardly with respect to the cone 65,, said displacement corresponding to the pitch ofthe screwthread. By this means, there is formed a corresponding clearance between the inside of the conical casing and the cone which in practice results in that the nozzle ducts are somewhat larger in cross-section than the bare cross-sections of the grooves 66,67 and 68. The nozzle ducts are however formed on ,the inside by a part of the cone and on the outside by a part of the conical casing, it having been shown in practice that it is of no importance if the nozzle ducts partially merge into one another owing to the saidclearance between the cone and conical casing. This isall the more the case if the grooves, measured in the peripheral direction are disposed relatively far apart and the said clearance between the cone and conical casing only amounts to extremely small amounts, so that the increase in nozzle crosssection is of considerable effect for the total flow crosssection, but not as regards the overflow conditions from one duct tothe other in the peripheral direction disposed transversely of the flow direction proper. The threaded extension 70 and the female thread 71 are made as fine threads and exactly fit one another so that in the tightly screwed position, the screw thread has a sealing effect against an unintentional back pressure of the pressure gas or of the liquids under pressure from the outlets 62', 63', 64', regardless of whether the conical casing 69 is tightly screwed until bearing firmly on the shoulder 72 or is slightly slackened off for regulating. the nozzle cross-see tion.

As will be seen more particularly from Figure 17, the cone 65is formed with two additional and substantially deeper grooves 73 and 74 which connect the pressure gas pipe 62 at the, commencement of the outlet 62 with the outlet 63 and 64 respectively of the liquid pipes 63 and 64. With the conical casing 69 screwed up, the pressure gas pipe is connected by a passage with each of the openings of the two liquid pipes, the wall of which is formed on the inside by a part of the cone and on the outside by a part of theconical casing, so that again, when the conical casing 69 is tightly screwed in position, the grooves 73 and 74 limit the passage on the inside and that part of the conical casing which is opposite the grooves limits the passage on the outside. In this case also, by partially unscrewing the conical casing .69, the corresponding passage cross-section is somewhat var ied. However, this is of lessimportance, as in this case it is a question of much deeper grooves than the case where the grooves 66, 67and 68 were concerned, sothat the axial displacement of the conical casing 69 to the extent to be expected in practice, has no-effect on the flowconditions. From the outlet 62 of the pressure gas pipe, the grooves 73 and 74 extend forward he1icallY,:so that the pressure gas which in use comes from'the pipe 62 and flows through said grooves exerts an injector-hire suction effect on the liquid supply at the opening into the liquid pipes 63 and 6 4 and the nozzle ducts 67 and 68 andeffects the formation of the spray. When used in practice, when the shut-0E members of the pipes 26, 3 2 and 33 are all opened, and pressure gas is flowing through thepipe 62 and a basic liquid component and an acid liquid component, both under pressure, flow respectively through the pipes 63 and 64, a fine jet of pressure gas or jet of liquid spray issues through the corresponding nozzlc ducts 66 and 67 and 68, respectively, all the jets uniting outside the conical casing 69 at the truncated theoretical apexof the cone and the spray, united at this point with formation of nascent carbon dioxide, impinges upon the object undergoing treatment.

Preferably, the handle element comprises an axial bore, (not shown), or two hollow members for fitting the handle of a brush associated with the theoretical apex of the cone. This brush can be so constructed and arranged that the bristles bear directly at the forward end of .the conical casing 69. The bore can therefore also be provided directly on the conical casing 69 or the brush can be secured in a detachable manner on the conical Contrary to .what is shown in the drawing, it is obviously also possible to secure the conical casing to the cone other than by means of the threaded extension 79 and the female thread 71, whether it he by a different type of screw-threaded arrangement or method of fixing. It is also readily possible to carry out the axial adjustment of the conical casing relatively to the cone in a manner other, than in conjunction with a rotation of the conical casing relatively to the cone. .It is therefore possible tocarry out a purely axial displacement, using known auxiliary means which are in everyday use by the expert for such purposes. More particularly such a case, it is readily possible to dispense with the grooves 66, 67 and 68 or 73 and 74 in the cone and to provide instead corresponding grooves on the inside of the conical casing, or more especially for the grooves, there can be used a combination between grooves in thecone and grooves in the conical casing which are mutually increased in size.

What I claimis:

1. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, ,sn applicator member; two nozzle conduits in said applicator member ending in nozzle openings arranged adjacent to each other with their axes intersecting one another; means for supplying fluid substances into both said nozzle eonduits; and meansfor supplying a gas under pressure into both said nozzle conduits, said gas under pressure ing along the fluids in said nozzle conduits in suspended state out through said nozzle openings, .whereby said fluids suspended in said gas under pressure and react with each other after leaving said nozzle openings.

2. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member; two nozzle conduits in said applicator member ending in nozzle arranged adjacent to each other with their axes intersecting one another; two ducts. extending axially in, said elongated applicator member respectively n at one end in said nozzle conduits for supplying all some into each of said nozzle conduits; and a duct extending axially in said applicator member for a gas under pressure into both said nozzle teonduitl said gas under pressure carrying along the lipids in'said noule conduits in suspended state out throughsaid nozzle openings, whereby said fluids suspended in said under pressure mix and react with each other after leaving said nozzle openings.

3. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in oombinnfion, first container means adapted to contain .a first substance; second container means adapted "to contain a second fluid substance; means supplying gas underpassure; an elongated applicator member; two'nozzlecom duits in said applicator member ending in nozzleopenings arranged adjacent to each other with their axes intersecting one another; two ducts extending axially in said elongated applicator member respectively opening at one end in said nozzle conduits, and being respectively connected at their other ends to said first and second container means for supplying a fluid substance into each of said nozzle conduits; and a third duct extending axially in said applicator member connected at one end to said two nozzle conduits and at its other end to said means supplying gas under pressure for delivering said gas under pressure into both said nozzle conduits, said gas under pressure carrying along the fluids in said nozzle conduits in suspended state out through said nozzle openings, whereby said fluids suspended in said gas under pressure mix and react with each other after leaving said nozzle openings.

4. Cleaning apparatus, comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member formed with a chamber at one end opening outwardly thereof at said one endptwo nozzle conduits in said applicator member ending in nozzle openings arranged in said chamber adjacent to each other with their axes intersecting one another; two ducts extending axially in said elongated applicator member respectively opening at one end in said nozzle conduits for supplying a fluid substance into each of said nozzle conduits; and a third duct extending axially in said applicator member for supplying a gas under pressure into both said nozzle conduits, said gas under pressure carrying along the fluids in said nozzle conduits in suspended state out through said nozzle openings, whereby said fluids suspended in said gas under pressure mix and react with each other after leaving said nozzle openings.

5. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member having a conical surface portion at one end formed with three converging nozzle grooves therein; three ducts extending axially through said applicator member from the other end thereof and opening in the conical surface portion thereof, and respectively connected with said nozzle grooves, one of said ducts being connected to the other two ducts adjacent the openings thereof in said conical surface portion; and a conical cap member arranged over said one end of said applicator member enclosing said conical surface portion thereof and defining nozzle channels with said nozzle grooves.

6. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member having a conical surface portion at one end formed with three converging nozzle grooves therein; three ducts extending axially through said applicator member from the other end thereof and opening in the conical surface portion thereof, and respectively connected with said nozzle grooves, one of said ducts being connected to the other two ducts adjacent the openings thereof in said conical surface portion; a conical cap member arranged over said one end of said applicator member enclosing said conical surface portion thereof and defining nozzle channels with said nozzle grooves; and means mounting said conical cap member for axial movement on said applicator member for varying the diameter of said nozzle channels defined thereby.

7. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member having a conical surface portion at one end formed with three converging nozzle grooves therein; three ducts extending axially through said applicator member from the other end thereof and opening in the conical surface portion thereof, and respectively connected with said nozzle grooves, one of said ducts being connected to the other two ducts adjacent the openings thereof in said conical surface portion; a conical cap member arranged over said one end of said applicator member enclosing said conical surface portion thereof and defining nozzle channels with said nozzle grooves; and means mounting said conical cap member for axial movement on said applicator member for varying the diameter of said nozzle channels defined thereby, said mounting means comprising a threaded portion on said applicator member at the base of said conical surface portion and projecting toward said one end of said applicator member, said conical cap member threadedly engaging said threaded portion for axial movement thereon.

8. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, an elongated applicator member having a conical surface portion at one end formed with three converging nozzle grooves therein; three ducts extending axially through said applicator member from the other end thereof and opening in the conical surface portion thereof, and respectively connected with said nozzle grooves; conduit means extending helically toward said one end of said applicator member connecting one, of the said ducts to the other two ducts adjacent the openings thereof in said conical surface portion; and a conical cap member arranged over said one end of said applicator member enclosing said conical surface portion thereof and defining nozzle channels with said nozzle grooves.

9. Cleaning apparatus comprising, in combination, first container means adapted to contain a first fluid substance; second container means adapted to contain a second fluid substance; means supplying gas under pressure; an elongated applicator member having a conical surface portion at one end formed with three converging nozzle grooves therein; three ducts extending axially through said applicator member from the other end thereof and opening at one end in the conical surface portion thereof, and respectively connected with said nozzle grooves, one of said ducts being connected to the other two ducts adjacent the openings thereof in said conical surface portion, said one duct being connected at its other end to said means supplying gas under pressure and said other two ducts being connected respectively at their other ends to said first and second container means for delivery of said fluid substances into said nozzle grooves with which they are respectively connected, said gas under pressure carrying along the fluid substances in said nozzle grooves in suspended state out of said one end of said applicator member; and a conical cap member arranged over said one end of said applicator member enclosing said conical surface portion thereof and defining nozzle channels with said nozzle grooves whereby said fluid substances suspended in said gas under pressure mix and react with each other outside of said applicator member after leaving said nozzle channels.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 114,256 Blake May 2, 1871 808,236 Hahn Dec. 26, 1905 998,762 Faller July 25, 1911 1,458,612 Berkshire June 12, 1923 1,575,671 Beanes Mar. 9, 1926 1,849,945 Mobley Mar. 15, 1932 2,006,289 Andvig June 25, 1935 2,164,153 Friedrich June 27, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US114256 *May 2, 1871 Improvement in fire-extinguishers
US808236 *Feb 13, 1905Dec 26, 1905Western Engineering CompanyWall-finishing process.
US998762 *May 19, 1911Jul 25, 1911Cement Appliances CompanyApparatus for combining comminuted solids and liquid.
US1458612 *Feb 15, 1922Jun 12, 1923Berkshire Clarence RCleaning tool
US1575671 *Feb 20, 1925Mar 9, 1926Bakerperkins Company IncApparatus for atomizing liquids and mixing same with gaseous substances
US1849945 *May 11, 1929Mar 15, 1932Fort Alfred MMethod and means for mixing and applying insulating material
US2006289 *Oct 7, 1932Jun 25, 1935Hans AndvigTeeth-cleansing appliance
US2164153 *Sep 15, 1937Jun 27, 1939Friedrich WilhelmApparatus for producing fire extinguishing foam
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3134127 *Oct 12, 1961May 26, 1964Klein Louis FTeeth cleaning and treating device
US3261354 *Apr 4, 1963Jul 19, 1966Harry ShpuntoffTooth cleaning tool
US3496933 *Aug 7, 1967Feb 24, 1970Sales Research Dev CoOral cleaning device
US3506002 *May 25, 1967Apr 14, 1970Stern Web Co TheDental syringe construction
US3823710 *Nov 7, 1972Jul 16, 1974J BordenPulsed air toothbrush and method
US3828771 *Nov 10, 1972Aug 13, 1974Gartner Res & Dev CoOral hygiene device
US4862876 *Aug 18, 1988Sep 5, 1989Lih Sheng KeDental and throat cleaning system
US4903688 *May 11, 1989Feb 27, 1990Kenneth BibbyTooth cleaning toothbrush and system
US4906187 *Aug 1, 1988Mar 6, 1990Koichi OkanoDevice for scaling at the gum pocket
US4941459 *Jun 7, 1989Jul 17, 1990Mathur Sandip KDental hygiene device
US5458563 *Nov 12, 1991Oct 17, 1995Stewart; Timothy N.Toothbrushes
US6658688Sep 17, 2002Dec 9, 2003James A. Gavney, Jr.Squeegee device and system
US6820299Mar 5, 2003Nov 23, 2004James A. Gavney, Jr.Dentition cleaning device and system
US6820300Aug 13, 2003Nov 23, 2004James A. Gavney, Jr.Squeegee device and system
US6859969Jun 3, 2003Mar 1, 2005James A. Gavney, Jr.Multi-directional wiping elements and device using the same
US6865767Sep 19, 2001Mar 15, 2005James A. Gavney, Jr.Device with multi-structural contact elements
US6944903May 5, 2004Sep 20, 2005Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US7047589Oct 6, 2004May 23, 2006Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US7051394Jun 30, 2004May 30, 2006Gavney Jr James ADentition cleaning device and system
US7069615Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Gavney Jr James ASqueegee device and system
US7181799Oct 24, 2003Feb 27, 2007Eegee, LlcOral-care device and system
US7363675Sep 26, 2005Apr 29, 2008Gavney Jr James ASqueegee device and system
US7434288Aug 24, 2004Oct 14, 2008Gavney Jr James AOral care device with multi-structural contact elements
US7562411Aug 19, 2004Jul 21, 2009Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US7743448Aug 19, 2005Jun 29, 2010Gavney Jr James ADevice and system with moving squeegee fields
US7814603Mar 29, 2005Oct 19, 2010Gavney Jr James APowered toothbrush with polishing elements
US7814604Mar 14, 2005Oct 19, 2010Gavney Jr James ADevice with multi-structural contact elements
US7877833Jul 6, 2005Feb 1, 2011Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US7934284Feb 11, 2003May 3, 2011Braun GmbhToothbrushes
US7958589Jun 12, 2009Jun 14, 2011The Gillette CompanyToothbrushes
US7975339Jul 20, 2004Jul 12, 2011Gavney Jr James AAquatic scrubber
US8141194May 4, 2005Mar 27, 2012Gavney Jr James AAbsorbent structures with integrated contact elements
US8276231Dec 7, 2005Oct 2, 2012Gavney Jr James AOral-care device and system
US8276233Dec 3, 2004Oct 2, 2012Gavney Jr James AMulti-directional wiping elements and device using the same
US8695149Apr 1, 2011Apr 15, 2014Braun GmbhToothbrushes
WO1991011981A1 *Feb 9, 1990Aug 22, 1991Kenneth BibbyTeeth cleaning toothbrush and system
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/200.19, 239/335, 601/162, 239/308, 239/428, 239/373, 74/566, 401/45
International ClassificationA61H33/14, A61C17/00, A61H33/02, A61C17/024, A61H13/00, A61H9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2033/145, A61H13/005, A61C17/00, A61H9/00, A61H33/02
European ClassificationA61H13/00B, A61C17/00, A61H9/00