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Publication numberUS2757824 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1956
Filing dateFeb 16, 1951
Priority dateFeb 16, 1951
Publication numberUS 2757824 A, US 2757824A, US-A-2757824, US2757824 A, US2757824A
InventorsSavary Andre
Original AssigneeSavary Andre
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing closure for receptacles
US 2757824 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7., 1956 A. SAVARY DISPENSING CLOSURE FOR RECEPTACLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 1" 1 Filed Feb. 16, '1-951 ilm /ai Aug. 7, 1956 A. SAVARY DISPENSING CLOSURE FOR RECEPTACLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 16, 1951 Aug. 7, 1956 A. SAVARY 2,757,824

' DISPENSING CLOSURE FOR RECEPTACLEIS Filed Feb. 16, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 A7 77 EPA E Y g- 7, 1955 A. SAVARY DISPENSING CLOSURE FOR RECEPTACLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 16, 1951 United States Patent Oflice 2,757,824 Patented Aug. 7, 1956 DISPENSING CLOSURE FOR RE'CEPTACLES Andr Savary, Castagnola Tessin, Switzerland Application February 16, 1951, Serial No. 211,261

13 Claims. (Cl. 222-209) This invention relates to dispensing closures, that is, closures for bottles and other receptacles wherein the closure has a special structural provision for dispensing material from the receptacle.

An important object of the invention is to provide a dispensing closure for receptacles which has a sealing part attached to the closure by means of a flexible connection which protects against loss of the sealing part.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a dispensing closure for receptacles wherein the closure has provision for sealing the contents prior to the initial placing in use, that is, prior to the initial dispensing operation, and provided with a sealing part which is protected against loss by means of a flexible connection attached to or forming a continuation of the closure. The sealing part is used to seal the closure after the initial placing in use.

Another object of the invention is to provide a dispensing closure which is particularly adapted, in a novel manner, for the dispensing of small quantities, if desired, of fluent material.

A further object of the invention is to provide a dispensing closure which includes a projecting nipple portion having a hollow interior through which material is to be dispensed. The passage of material through the nipple is, however, blocked by a thin wall forming part of the nipple, which wall may be ruptured at the time of the initial placing in use.

Other objects of the invention reside in the specific constructions of this thin wall, and in the provisions for rupturing this thin wall.

Another important object of the invention resides in the provision of dispensing closures in accordance with the invention which are particularly adapted, but not limited to use with, flexible tubes such as toothpaste tubes and the like. This object includes the provision of a construction for retaining the closure on the neck which isnormally provided on such tubes, in such a manner that if the contents of the tube should be compressed while the closure is sealed, this compression will cause the closure to be held more tightly on the neck, and in one embodiment, will cause the sealing part previously referred to, to be held more securely in place on the closure.

A further object of the invention, when considered in connection with toothpaste tubes and the like, resides in the provision of a positive means in the form of a pro jection carried by the closure cap for retaining the sealing part in sealing position in a positive manner, while still providing for ready removal of the sealing part.

- piece and the provision of the aforementioned flexible Still another object of the invention resides in the with, but not limited to, this form-of the invention is the provision of a sealing part in the form of a cylindrical connection in the form of a pair of resilient arms pivotally carried by the closure cap on opposite sides of the cap and on a pivot axis which is offset from the axis of the passage through which the material is dispensed.

Another important object of the invention resides in the inclusion in the dispensing closure of a flexible closure member having an outwardly protruding hollow nipple through which material can be dispensed by pressing on the flexible closure member.

The above, as well as other objects of the invention will become apparent from a study of the following specification, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through a modified form of the closure;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through still another possible form of the closure;

Fig. 3a is a top plan view of the construction shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through another modification of the invention;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through another embodiment showing a clamping type of mounting;

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view taken through and provided for spreading the material, as well as one particular form of the rupturable thin wall;

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view taken at right angles to the section of Fig. 6 and showing the sealing cap in position to protect the brush and close the dispensing opening or passage;

Fig. 8 is a top plan view of the closure shown in Fig. 6;

Fig. 9 is an exploded, longitudinal sectional view taken through another embodiment of the invention in which the brush forms part of a unit which includes a piercing element;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 but showing the brush in operating position and the sealing cap in its sealing position;

Fig. 11 is a longitudinal sectional view of a form of the invention which is particularly applicable to mounting on the neck of toothpaste tubes and the like;

Fig. 12 is a side elevational view of the construction shown in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a top plan view of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14 is a longitudinal sectional view, partly in elevation, of another embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 15 is a longitudinal sectional view of another embodiment of the invention as applied particularly to toothpaste tubes and the like, and showing a rupturable sealing wall intact;

Fig. 16 is a view similar to Fig. 15, but showing the rupturable wall removed, and showing the sealing part locked in sealing position;

Fig. 17 is a longitudinal sectional view showing a modified form of the invention, including a provision whereby pressure exerted on the material in the receptacle causes tighter holding of the closure on the neck tube;

Fig. 18 is a sectional view through a modified form of sealing part; and

Fig. 19 is a view similar to Fig. 17, but showing the original sealing wall removed and thesealing part in sealing position. A modified form of' sealing part is shown in this figure.

Referring now to the drawingsin further detail, Fig. 1 shows a longitudinal sectional view through a closure which includes an internally threaded annular piece 20 intended for screwing on to .a bottle at the vlocation'of the pouring opening. 'f The annular piece orcollar '20' has an inwardly projecting flange 21 located just above the termination of the threaded portion of the collar and intermediate the extreme ends of the collar, there being an annular peripheral collar flange 21a above flange 21. Flange 21 extends only a short distance inwardly so as to leave a large opening for passage of the material in the bottle, and the upper surface 22 of this flange slopes downwardly from the outside toward the inside in a frustoconical configuration. Flanges 21 and 2111 thus define a seating 24.

Within the peripheral collar flange 21a in seating 24 there is positioned an inverted cup-shaped, flexible closure member 23 which may be of rubber or some flexible synthetic plastic, or the like.

The closure member 23 is provided with a nipple 25, which is integral therewith and is located off-center with regard to the closure member 23. The nipple is hollow, having an internal passage 27, which communicates with the interior of closure member 23, but which is sealed at its outer end by a thin wall 26 which is actually an integral continuation of the side walls of the nipple.

The nipple is reduced in diameter at its outer end portion, and the internal channel 27 in the nipple is similarly reduced in diameter at its outer end portion.

This narrowing of the internal channel 25 provides an internal shoulder 29, the purpose of which will be explained presently.

A stopper is provided for closing and sealing the dispensing channel 25 after it has been opened at the initial placing in use, and this stopper has an enlarged end portion 31 intended for engagement with shoulder 29, when in sealing position, thus holding the stopper against accidental removal. Stopper 30 is protected against loss prior to and after the initial placing in use, by means of a flexible retaining strip 32 which connects the stopper with the closure member 23. This retaining strip 32 is preferably formed integrally with both the stopper 30 and the closure member 23, but it may also be attached to one or both by a hot process, or even by means of a suitable adhesive.

In use, the rupturable end portion 26 of the nipple pro tects the contents of the bottle or other receptacle and seals the closure prior to the initial placing in use. This tip portion may be cut or torn away when it is desired to place the article in use for the first time, and thereafter the stopper 30 is inserted into nipple 25 in order to seal the closure and prevent evaporation of the contents, contamination from the outside, etc.

The use of a flexible closure member 23 permits dispensing of small quantities of the material by suitable pressure on the exterior of the cup-shaped closure member 23. It will be noted that after the closure is inverted from the position shown in Fig. 1, during use, and is then returned to the upright position, any of the material in the receptacle which has passed into the interior of the closure 23 will drain back on to the upper surface 22 of the annular flange 21, and because of the sloping disposition of this surface, it will then drain back into the interior of the receptacle.

Thus, the closure of Fig. 1 can be used to dispense small quantitiesof fluent material, such as liquids, powders, and the like, for instance being useful in dispensing drops of liquid, and after use, the material goes back into the receptaclefrom the closure. Absolute security for the contents of the receptacle is assured by the provision of the rupturable sealing wall 26 closing the end of the nipple prior to the initial placing in use, and after this portion of the nipple is ruptured at the time of the initial placing in use, plug 30 is used for closing the nipple and sealing the same, thus, this plug 30 comprises a sealing part.

Fig. 2 shows a variation of the construction shown in Fig. 1, this variation including the mounting of the closure member 23a about the exterior of the upper end of the collar 20a, the sloping surface 220 then being located at the highest portion of collar 20a, and since the closure member 23a fits tightly about the outer periphery of the upwardly extending flange portions of collar 20a, the outer periplnry of the frustoconical surface 22a abuts the inner surface of the flexible closure member 23a.

Fig. 2 also shows the sealing part 30a formed as a cap which fits over the outer end of nipple 25a. This cap has an opening therein, the end portion of which is reduced in diameter so as to provide a firm grip on the nipple. The nipple in this figure has an internal channel 27a having a reduced outer end portion 28a, and the sealing part 30a is attached to the closure 23a by a flexible connection 320.

In both Figs. 1 and 2, the reduced diameter of the outer end portion of the nipple provides a widened base for the nipple, which indicates to the user that the nipple is to be cut above this widened base portion. The constricted or reduced diameter outer end portion 28a of the channel in the nipple extends into the. aforementioned base portion of the nipple, so that even when the nipple is cut ofi immediately adjacent the upper end of the base portion, part of the reduced channel portion will remain so as to provide a good seal with the plug 30.

Fig. 3 shows a variation which is quite similar to Fig. 1, but wherein the closure member 23b is formed as one piece with the collar which engages the receptacle, the lower end of this closure member being slightly enlarged and provided with threads. The rest of the construction corresponds with the construction of Fig. l, certain of the parts being denoted by corresponding reference numerals 27b, 28b, 30b, and 31b.

Fig. 4 shows a variation wherein the nipple 25c is located axially with respect to the closure 230, the plug for the nipple being omitted from this figure, although the end portion of the flexible connection 320, connected to the base of the nipple, is shown. Here the closure 23c is held in place on the upper end of a bottle or other receptacle 35 by means of a metal clamping plate 36 which is turned downwardly at its periphery about the enlarged upper end of the bottle, and which has a central opening through which the nipple projects. This clamp holds the flat lower portion of the closure member 23c tightly against the upper end of the bottle. The portion of the metal piece 36 surrounding the opening for the nipple is bent back as shown at 37 to protect the nipple against being cut by the metal. This construction is particularly intended for use as a medicine dropper.

Fig. 5 shows another form of the invention in which an annular clamp 37 engages a transversely extending, annular flange at the lower end of the flexible closure member 23d and clamps this flange tightly against the end of a bottle neck 38. The closure member in this embodiment extends upwardly beyond the flange 38 and has a nipple 25d, a flexible connection 32d, and a sealing part (not shown). All of the embodiments discussed above provide convenient means for dispensing small quantities, such as drops, of a liquid, without the necessity for using a separate dropper.

Variations of the invention which include the use of a material spreader, such as a brush located in the nipple, are shown in Figs. 6-10. These forms of the invention also include variations in the form of the rupturablc sealing wall of the nipple, these variations also being applicable to the construction described above with regard to Figs. 1-5. Variations in the arrangement for mounting the closure members on a bottle or other receptacle are also shown, and these are also applicable to the constructions of Figs. 1-5.

In Fig. 6 there is shown a threaded collar 40 for mounting on the neck of the bottle or other receptacle, and a flexible closure member 41, similar to the member 23 of Fig. 1, in function, is mounted in the upper end of this collar 40 by means of a suitable flange and shoulder arrangement shown at 42. Extending upwardly from the closure member 41, and constructed integrally therewith, is a nipple 43 having a'hollow interior'forming a channel 44, and sealed at its lower end by means of an integral, thin wall 45. An elongated tongue 46 is formed integrally with the thin wall 45, and extends into the interior of the closure and far enough to be grasped by the user when it is desired to rupture the thin wall 45 when the closure is initially placed in use, that is, at the time of the first dispensing operation. It is, of course, desirable that the tongue 46 be stronger than the thin wall 45, or else the tongue will rupture before the thin wall is ruptured.

A brush 47 is mounted in the outer end of the nipple 43, this brush being located in a suitable holder which includes a small passage 48 which is in communication with the passage 44 of the nipple.

A sealing part and protective cap is provided at 49, this sealing part being constructed so as to fit over the outer end of nipple 43 and brush 47 to protect the brush and prevent evaporation and spilling of the contents of the receptacle after the initial placing in use by rupturing of thin wall 45. Either or both of the surface portions of sealing part 49 and nipple 43 which come into contact with each other when the sealing part is placed on the nipple may be provided with suitable raised ridges and the like, such as are shown at 51, for assuring against accidental dislodgment of the cap 49.

As in the case of Figs. 1-6, the sealing part or cap 49 is protected against loss by means of a flexible connection 50, which is preferably formed integrally with the closure member 41 and with the cap 49.

After the initial placing in use by the rupture of the thin sealing wall 45, the dome-shaped closure member 41 may be pressed with the finger from the outside, and.

if the receptacle is tilted or inverted, material from the receptacle is forced on to the brush 47, the quantity being governed by the amount of pressure exerted and the number of times the pressure is applied.

It will be noted that Figs. 6 and 7 show constructions which differ only in the form of the cap containing ridge 51, and also in the forming of the closure member 41 integral with the collar 42 in Fig. 7. In both these figures it will be noted that internal, integral strengthening ribs 52 are formed on opposite sides of the lower entry of the passage 44 in the nipple.

Figs. 9 and difier in the manner of attachment of the closure member to the bottle or other receptacle, but otherwise they are both intended to show a construction which difiers from Figs. 6 and 7 primarily in the construction of the rupturable thin wall which seals the nipple, and in the manner in which this wall is ruptured.

In Fig. 9, the lower end of the closure member 55 is enlarged at 56 so to fit snugly about the bottle neck 57.

A similar construction is shown in Fig. 10, except that a thin band 58 surrounds the lowermost end of the portion 56 so as to hold the closure member on the bottle.

In both Figs. 9 and 10 there are shown all or part of the flexible connection 59, the internal channel 60 of the nipple, the retaining ridge 61, and the sealing part or cap 62.

In Fig. 9, the integral, rupturable thin wall which initially seals the passage in the nipple, is shown at 63. This wall is located somewhat higher in the nipple than the wall 45 of Figs. 6 and 7, and the tongue 46 is omitted. The brush 64 is mounted in a collar 65 which carries a downwardly projecting, tubular rupturing or piercing member 66 which is dimensioned to fit closely within the channel of the nipple. This piercing element 66 ruptures the thin wall 63 when the brush unit is inserted into the channel 60 at the time of the initial placing in use, and thereafter, the sealing part or cap 62 is used for closing the container. This cap is shown in its closed position in Fig. 10, the piercing element 66 being shown within the channel 60 in the nipple.

The construction of Figs. 6-10 is particularly useful for the application of glue, nail polish, nail polish remover, and the like. Evaporation is reduced to a minimum, since only a very small opening is present, the cap 62 preventing evaporation after the initial placing in use. The brush is protected at all times, so that foreign matter does not become adhered to it, and the touching of the brush against undesired objects is avoided.

It is preferable that the sealing part or cap 49 or 62 be molded integrally with the closure member 41 or 55.

Where the closure device of Figs. 6-10 is used with a flexible plastic container, the closure member 41 need not be flexible.

It is desirable that the brush have a lateral, rather than an axial opening, so that the liquid will come out tangentially on to the brush surface.

It is also to be noted that the more or less permanent types of the closure on the bottle, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10, are particularly applicable to the constructions of these figures, wherein it is unnecessary to remove the closure from the bottle in order to prepare the closure for dispensing.

Figs. 11-19 show highly useful variations of the invention, particularly applicable to use with flexible tubes such as toothpaste tubes and the like, wherein the tube has a neck extending from one end thereof. Such a tube is shown at 70 in Fig. 11. Fitting tightly over this neck, and held securely thereon by means of mating male and female configurations such as annular ridges 71 provided on its interior and cooperating with correspondingly dimensioned and located annular grooves on the neck 70, is a cap 72. This cap is preferably of a molded material such as Bakelite or some other synthetic resin. The cap is formed with an axially extending, pointed projection 73, which is relatively thin walled, and which seals a dispensing passage 74 located within the cap in communication with the central opening in the neck 70.

Cap 72 carries a pair of resilient metal clips or arms 75 which are pivoted at their lower ends to cap 72. This pivotal attachment is by means of inwardly directed hooked lower ends 76 of these arms, these lower ends '76 being pivotally supported in suitable mountings 77 which may comprise projections which are integral with the cap 72, or may comprise individual blocks which are mounted within notches 78 provided in the lower edge of the cap. The pivot axis of arms 75 is offset from the central axis of the cap, as is evident from Figs. 12 and 13.

Arms 75 carry a sealing part 73 which may be in the form of a cylinder which is preferably of a plastic, compressible substance.

In use, the projection 73 seals the contents of the tube prior to the initial placing in use, at which time this projection is ruptured by being pinched off or otherwise removed. This leaves a relatively small dispensing opening at the upper end of passage 74, and when it is desired to reclose this passage, arms 75 and sealing part 78 are swung in the counterclockwise direction in Fig. 12 to position the sealing part 78 :at the opening. The resiliency of arms 75, and the compressibility of sealing part 78 assure a tight seal.

The projection 73 can be shaped so as to provide a circular dispensing opening, or it can be elongated in a lateral direction so as to provide :a ribbon when the contents of the tube are forced out. Correspondingly, the sealing part 78 can either be in the form of a ball or in the form of a cylinder.

Fig. 14 shows a toothpaste tube or the like provided with a closure somewhat similar to those shown in Figs. 1-10, wherein a nipple 80 having an interior passage 81, is attached to the neck 82 by means of an annular clamp 83 which fits about rounded side walls of the neck. The clamp has at its upper end an inwardly turned flange portion 84 which holds the nipple tightly against the end edge of the neck 32. The nipple is adapted to be ruptured at its end portion, as previously explained with regard to Figs. 15, and after being ruptured, it may be closed again by means of a plug 85 which is attached to the nipple by means of a flexible connection 86 which may be integral with both the plug and the nipple.

Figs. 15 and 16 show a highly useful form of the invention, wherein the closure member, the initial sealing wall, and the sealing part comprise a single molded piece. The neck 88 in this case has a bulging shape which facilitates secure mounting of the closure thereupon. The closure member 89 has an axially extending projection 90 which initially seals a dispensing passage 91 which is in communication with the interior of neck 88. A sealing part 92 is formed integrally with the closure member 89, and is connected therewith by a flexible connection 93 which will ordinarily pivot about a point 94 when the sealing part is placed in sealing position on the closure member. The sealing part 92 is provided with an indentation 95 which fits about a mating projecting base portion 96 formed on the closure member 89, and the sealing part also has a further cavity 96 which accommodatcs any small portions of projection 90 which remain after the main portion of this projection is torn away.

Sealing part 92 is provided with an integral tab 97 to facilitate handling of the cap during its mounting and demounting from the closure member 89. An opening 98 is located in the webbing connecting tab 97 with sealing part 92, and this opening is positioned so as to cooperate with a projection 99 located on the side wall of closure member 89 at a point diametrically opposite from point 94. Projection 99 is curved in a direction toward the tube, so that when the sealing part 92 is in its sealing position, opening 98 may be placed about projection 99 so as to provide a positive retention of the sealing part 92 in its sealing position. When it is desired to remove the sealing part 92 from its sealing position, it is only necessary to grasp tab 97, and with an outward pull, swing the cap 92 from its closing position.

Figs. 17-19 show a further variation of the invention constructed so that, after the initial opening, and when the sealing part is in its closing position, pressure on the contents of the tube will have a tendency to spread the walls of the closure member so as to cause the sealing part or cap to be held more tightly thereon. In these figures, the neck of a tube is shown at 100, the closure member is shown at 101, and a thin wall sealing the dispensing channel in the closure member prior to the initial placing in use is shown at 102. A sealing part or cap 103 is connected to the closure member 101 by means of a flexible, integral connection 104.

It will be noted that the closure member 101 extends a substantial distance in the axial direction beyond the tip in neck .100, and that this portion of the closure memher is provided with a convex inner wall configuration, as shown at 105. The exterior surface of this portion of the closure member is cylindrical, and, in the embodiment shown in Fig. 17, is provided with an annular ridge 106 which assists in providing a tight fit with cap 103 and to assure a good seal and minimize the possibility of accidental dislodgment of cap 103 from its sealing position. Variations of this ridge 106 are shown in Figs. 18 and 19, there being two ribs 107 on the interior lateral wall of the cap 103 in Fig. 18, and there being a single rib 107 cooperating with a mating groove in the lateral side wall of the closure member 101 in the emhodimcnt of Fig. 19. In addition, the embodiment of Fig. .9 includes a tab 108 located on the outer lateral wall of cap 103 diametrically opposite the point of attachment thereto of flexible connection 104. This tab provides a convenient grip for removal of the cap from its sealing position.

The thin wall 102 in Fig. 17 is adapted to be ruptured and removed as in the case of the other embodiments at the time of the initial placing in use, and in Fig. 19, the sealing wall has been removed.

In the embodiments of Figs. 17-19, after sealing wall 102 has been removed and cap 103 is in sealing position,

as shown in Fig. 19, any increase in the pressure in the contents of the tube which might, with an ordinary type of closure, tend to push the cap loose, would result in a more secure holding of the cap in place. This results from the increase in pressure against the lateral, interior walls of the closure, whereby these walls are forced outwardly slightly, thus increasing the tightness of the fit of the cap 103, and also increasing the locking effect of ridges 106, 107, and the like, whether or not these ridges are used with correspondingly located grooves.

In use of this form of the invention, the mpturable wall 102 is pulled or cut away at the time of initial placing in use, and the scaling part 103 is used thereafter. The closing and opening of the sealing part is facilitated by means of tab 108.

In the various embodiments of the invention shown above, the particular construction shown have been given in an illustrative and exemplary sense, and not in a limit ing sense, and I wish it to be understood that variations of these embodiments may be carried out without depart ing from the inventive concept. It is my intention to cover by my patent all variations of the invention falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dispensing closure for fluent material-containing receptacles, said closure comprising a body of flexible material capable of being molded, said body having a thin deformable wall portion, a hollow nipple integrally formed with said body and projecting therefrom and adapted to have an end orifice, a member for closing the orifice end of said nipple, and a thin strip secured to said body on which said closing member is secured.

2. A single piece dispensing closure for fluent materialcontaining receptacles, said closure being of flexible material capable of being molded, said closure comprising a body having a deformable wall, a hollow nipple projecting from said body and adapted to have an end orifice, a member for closing the orifice end of said hollow nipple, and a thin elongated part connecting said closing member and said body and integrally formed therewith.

3. A dispensing closure as claimed in claim 2 in which said flexible material capable of being molded is an elastic material.

4. A dispensing closrxe as claimed in claim 2 in which said wall is outwardly convex.

5. A dispensing closure as claimed in claim 2 in which said body includes an annular peripheral portion adapted to be secured on the extremity of the neck of a receptacle.

6. A dispensing closure as claimed in claim 2 in which said wall is outwardly convex and is provided with means for fixing it on a receptacle.

7. A dispensing closure. as claimed in claim 2 in which said hollow nipple is initially closed by a wall on its free extremity.

8. A dispensing closure as claimed in claim 2 in which a channel extends through said hollow nipple, said channel being reduced in diameter at the free extremity thereof.

9. A dispensing. closure as claimed in claim 2 in which a channel extends through said hollow nipple and is reduced in diameter at. the free extremity thereof, and the closing device is formed by a stopper in the shape of a stem having an enlarged portion at its extremity.

10; A dispensing closure as claimed in claim 2 in which said hollow nipp'le is outwardly narrowed at its free extremity and the closing device is constituted by a cap ca pable of engaging said free extremity.

11. A- single piece dispensing closure for fluent materialcontaining receptacles, said closure being of a flexible material capable of being molded, said closure comprising a body having a deformable wall, a hollow nipple projecting from said body and forming an end orifice, an internal channelin said nipple, said channel having a reduced end portion to form an internal shoulder, a closing member for said end orifice, said closing member having an enlarged end portion to engage said internal shoulder.

12. A dispensing closure as recited in claim 11 including an elongated thin strip interconnecting said closure and said closing member.

13. A dispensing closure as recited in claim 11 including, an elongated thin strip interconnecting said closure and said closing member, said closure, said closing member and said strip being integrally formed.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2887240 *Apr 2, 1956May 19, 1959Stella K G Werner DeussenInsertable closure for bottles and like containers
US3016173 *Mar 2, 1956Jan 9, 1962Stull Morton BClosure and dispensing structure
US3042242 *Feb 13, 1961Jul 3, 1962Inredeco IncStopper with safety seals
US3192555 *Jun 19, 1963Jul 6, 1965Pittsburgh Plastics Division HContainer dispenser cap with captive closure member and applicator
US3241731 *Aug 8, 1963Mar 22, 1966Lever Brothers LtdCaps with spouts
US3282478 *Dec 9, 1964Nov 1, 1966Keith Russell JohnCaptive closure cap
US4397879 *Jul 14, 1982Aug 9, 1983Warren WilsonApparatus for and method of making funnel cakes
US5265770 *May 11, 1992Nov 30, 1993Pall CorporationContamination-resistant dispensing and metering device
US7131551 *Apr 15, 2004Nov 7, 2006Solo Cup CompanyContainer lid with closure member
US7134566 *Aug 15, 2003Nov 14, 2006Solo Cup CompanyContainer lid with closure member
US8631957Jan 9, 2008Jan 21, 2014Dart Container CorporationRecloseable lid with closure plug
US20120312827 *Aug 6, 2012Dec 13, 2012Zuares Daniel JDrinking Cup Lid Having a Sealing Plug Attached With Two Arms
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/209, 425/809, 222/543, 425/DIG.300, 264/DIG.410, 222/545, 222/566
International ClassificationB65D47/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10S425/809, Y10S425/003, Y10S264/41, B65D47/18
European ClassificationB65D47/18