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Publication numberUS2757965 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1956
Filing dateAug 24, 1953
Priority dateAug 24, 1953
Publication numberUS 2757965 A, US 2757965A, US-A-2757965, US2757965 A, US2757965A
InventorsAlvadore M Andrews
Original AssigneeAlvadore M Andrews
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof sprinkler
US 2757965 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7, 1956 A. M. ANDREWS 2,757,965

ROOF SPRINKLER Filed Aug. 24, 1953 T9 5' IN VEN TOR.

5 ALVADORE M. ANDREWS ATTOF iNEYS United States Patent Office 2,757,965 Patented Aug. 7, 1956 ROOF SPRINKLER Alvadore M. Andrews, Portland, Oreg. Application August 24, 1953, Serial No. 376,104 2 Claims. (31. 299-104 The present invention relates to a roof sprinkler, and more particularly to a device for distributing or sprinkling water over an inclined surface such as a roof.

The present application is a continuation-in-part of my co-pending application, Serial No. 318,065, filed October 31, 1952. v

A large portion of the heat accumulating in one-story buildings, and in the upper floor of multistory buildings, during the summer months, comes through a transfer of heat through the roof of the building. The summer sun striking directly upon the roof surface frequently heats the surface to a temperature so great that the roof will be exceedingly uncomfortable to touch. If no insulation is provided beneath the roof, a considerable amount of heat will be transferred through the roof to heat the air beneath. Also, if the roof is proximate to the occupants in the room, the radiation of the heat may be quite uncomfortable.

To cool the roof and reduce the heat transferred therethrough, sprinkling systems have frequently been installed to sprinkle water over the roof. However, systems as provided heretofore have utilized bulky and expensive equipment. Moreover, the water has not been distributed evenly by others, and in some cases it was not possible to regulate the rate of water flow and distribution so that the roof would be completely covered without at the same time sprinkling so much water that large amounts would flow off of the edges of the roof.

It is a principal object of the present invention, therefore, to provide a simple, inexpensive roof sprinkling system.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a simple, inexpensive device for distributing an evaporative film of water upon a roof surface whereby to absorb the heat of the roof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a roof sprinkling device adapted to be secured to a rooffor sprinkling or distributing water evenly over the roof to cool the same.

A further object of the invention is to provide a roof sprinkling device comprising an elongate, perforated tube or hose, and means extending therefrom by means of which the tube may be secured in desired position upon a inclined roof.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more apparent hereinafter.

For a detailed description of the present invention, reference is made to the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. l is a perspective view showing one embodiment of a sprinkling device in accordance with the invention mounted upon a gabled roof;

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken substantially along line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a view showing another embodiment of the invention mounted upon the ridge of a roof or building;

Fig. 4 is a view showing still another arrangement for mounting sprinkling hoses along the ridge of a roof;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged, cross-sectional view taken along line 55 of Fig. 6; and

Fig. 6 is a top plan view of an arrangement of hoses suitable for mounting as shown in Fig. 4.

Referring first to Figs. 1 and 2, there is shown a fragmentary portion of a peaked roof 10 having mounted along each of the opposite sides of the ridge 11, a roof sprinkling device 12 formed in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. Each of the sprinkling devices 12 is substantially the same, and the description of one will sufiice for each. A sprinkling device 12 comprises an elongate, rectangular sheet of flexible material, which is preferably substantially water-impervous but not necessarily so as will become apparent, and may be a thin sheet of a suitable plastic such as vinyl chlorideaeetate. The sheet is formed to provide a longitudinally extending tube or conduit 13 on one side thereof by overfolding and underturning one of the longitudinal edge portions 15 of the sheet and securing the edge portion 15 to a substantially medial, longitudinally extending portion of the sheet. While the edge portion 15 may be sealed to the medial portion of the sheet in any suitable manner, it may be conveniently sealed thereto by placing between the adjacent overlapping portions of the sheet a thread 16 saturated with a bond effecting liquid and thereafter applying pressure to cause the liquid to be expressed between the overlapping surface portions so as to effect a liquid-tight bond therebetween. Such a method of sealing sheets of plastic material together is more completely described in my Patent 2,500,053, issued March 7, 1950. Preferably the sheet of plastic is perforated to provide a plurality of small apertures or openings 18 of substantially uniform diameter and spaced apart substantially uniformly along the entire length of the sheet prior to forming the sheet to provide a conduit. A convenient method of perforating the sheet and apparatus for so doing is shown and described in my copending application, Serial No. 316,037, filed October 21, 1952, now Patent No. 2,683,208.

The conduit 13 is adapted to be secured in position on the roof by means of the remaining flap or tab portion 19 of the sheet which may be secured to the roof in any suitable manner as, for example, by gluing it thereto as indicated at 20 whereby the hose is positioned closely adjacent the ridge 11 and parallel therewith.

After mounting the device 12 on a roof, it is connected to a suitable source of water indicated at 23 to effect distribution of water over the surface of the roof which will escape through the conduit openings 18. Preferably the water pressure is regulated so that the amount escaping from the hose is no greater, or not substantially greater, than the amount evaporated from the roof surface. This, of course, is desirable so as to eliminate wastage of the water since the excess Water would merely drip off of the edge of the roof and have little cooling effect. Obviously, as mentioned before, it is not absolutely necessary that the device 12 be formed of water-impervious material. What is essential is that the material forming the hose be of sufficient water tightness that water will be carried the entire length of the hose and water will escape therefrom uniformly all along the length of the hose.

Spraying or wetting the roof of a building with the device of the invention will effect a reduction of many degrees in the interior temperature of the building since the water absorbs a large quantity of heat in its evaporation and the roof is maintained at a much lower temperature than it would attain if it were not kept moist.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in Fig. 3, an elongate sheet of plastic or other suitable material is formed to provide a pair of hoses 30, 31 along each of the longitudinal edges of the sheet. As shown, the

device is adapted to be positioned on the roof with the hoses 30, 31 on the opposite sides of the ridge and with the interconnecting web 32 disposed over the ridge and supporting the hoses. The web 32 may be secured to the roof by tacking or gluing the same thereto.

Another embodiment of the invention is shown in Figs. 4, and 6 and which embodiment comprises two pairs of tubes 40, 41 connected together in laterally spacedapart, longitudinally parallel relation by a web or flap 43 of flexible sheet material whereby the device may be aligned along the ridge of a roof 11 with the web 43 extending along the peak thereof and supporting the .pairs of tubes on each of the opposite sides of the peak as shown in Fig. 4. The outermost tube 44- of each of the pairs is of water-impervious material and is not perforated, and is sealed at each of its opposite ends as shown in Fig. 6. The innermost tube 45 of each pair is perforated along its length to spray water upwardly and outwardly of the tube when arranged on a roof as shown in Fig. 4. The innermost tubes 45 are sealed at one end and are connected at their other end to a suitable coupling device 46 for coupling the tubes to a water outlet. Preferably the tubes 44, 45 are formed as pairs having a common wall as shown in Fig. 5, and which wall is perforated at various points along its length as indicated at 47 so that water may flow from the innermost tube 45 to the outermost tube 44 of a pair. Since there are no outlets in the outermost tube 44 through which the water may escape when the device is mounted on the roof, the water flowing into the tube 44 will remain therein to weight the tubes, thus providing an anchoring means to retain the device in position on the ridge of a roof and prevent it from being blown off even when it is not in use, so that it is not necessary to otherwise secure the web 43 to the roof.

Having illustrated and described preferred embodiments of the invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the invention permits of modification in arrangement and detail. I claim as my invention all such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A roof sprinkling device comprising two pairs of elongate tube means formed of water-impervious material, web means extending between said pairs of tube means for securing the same in longitudinally parallel, laterally spaced-apart relation whereby said device may be mounted along the ridge of a gable roof with said web means extending over said ridge and supporting said pairs of tube means one on each of the opposite sides of said ridge, coupling means on the innermost tubes of each of said pairs for connecting the same to a source of water, each of said innermost tubes having a plurality of fine apertures through the wall thereof spaced to spray water laterally outwardly of the corresponding side of said device, the outermost tubes of each of said pairs being sealed at each of their opposite ends, and means for providing communication between the innermost tube and outermost tube of each pair whereby water will flow into said outermost tube from said innermost tube.

2. A sprinkling device comprising two pairs of elongate tube means formed of water-impervious material, web means extending between said pairs of tube means for securing the same in longitudinally parallel, laterally spaced-apart relation, coupling means on the innermost tubes of each of said pairs for connecting the same to a source of water, each of said innermost tubes having a plurality of fine apertures through the wall thereof spaced to spray water laterally outwardly of the corresponding side of said device, the outermost tubes of each of said pairs being sealed at each of their opposite ends, and means for providing communication between the innermost tube and outermost tube of each pair whereby water will flow into said outermost tube from said innermost tube.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 125,594 Mayall Apr. 19, 1872 431,203 Dithridge July 1, 1890 1,620,142 Thompson Mar. 8, 1927 1,936,732 Renard NOV. 28, 1933 2,070,665 Lepper Feb. 16, 1937 2,500,053 Andrews Mar. 7, 1950 2,566,833 Healy Sept. 4, 1951 2,621,075 'Sedar Dec. 9, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 46,756 Switzerland Mar. 12, 1909

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US125594 *Apr 9, 1872 Improvement in rubber-flanged tubings for packing
US431203 *Aug 28, 1889Jul 1, 1890 George w
US1620142 *Apr 24, 1925Mar 8, 1927Albert T WalravenFire extinguisher
US1936732 *Nov 27, 1928Nov 28, 1933Henry L RenardMethod and apparatus for protecting glass panes from injury
US2070665 *Jul 27, 1936Feb 16, 1937Lepper Robert JCombined hose and sprinkler
US2500053 *May 14, 1947Mar 7, 1950Alvadore M AndrewsMethod of joining pieces of plastic
US2566833 *Feb 1, 1950Sep 4, 1951Healy James JHose for irrigating purposes
US2621075 *May 21, 1951Dec 9, 1952Resin IndMultiple irrigation tubing
CH46756A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2974329 *Mar 2, 1959Mar 14, 1961Welch Richard WCombination windshield and spray curtain
US3769993 *Jun 22, 1971Nov 6, 1973Schaeffer JSwimming pool cleaning system
US3782704 *Jan 15, 1973Jan 1, 1974Schramm IncApparatus and method for producing air bubbles in a body of liquid
US3874598 *Dec 17, 1973Apr 1, 1975Dow Chemical CoIrrigation tube
US4175703 *Dec 9, 1977Nov 27, 1979Spraycool, Inc.Spray cooling system for gable roof
US4358862 *Dec 3, 1980Nov 16, 1982Thermasol, Ltd.Connector assembly for whirlpool system
US4548360 *May 22, 1984Oct 22, 1985William W. C. DelmerMultichamber drip irrigation hose
US4879852 *Feb 3, 1989Nov 14, 1989Tripp Kenneth CApparatus for maintaining soil moisture
US6964379Apr 7, 2003Nov 15, 2005Crowley Joseph TExterior fire suppression system and method for installation
US20040216899 *Apr 7, 2003Nov 4, 2004Crowley Joseph TExterior fire suppression system and method for installation
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/268, 138/115, 239/207, 239/565, 239/269, 138/111
International ClassificationF24F1/00, B05B1/20, F24F5/00, A01G9/24, E04D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/20, A01G9/24, F24F5/0007, Y02B30/545, E04D13/00, F24F2001/0092
European ClassificationF24F5/00C, E04D13/00, B05B1/20, A01G9/24