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Publication numberUS2759346 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1956
Filing dateDec 20, 1954
Priority dateDec 20, 1954
Publication numberUS 2759346 A, US 2759346A, US-A-2759346, US2759346 A, US2759346A
InventorsBeduhn Daniel E
Original AssigneeManitowoe Engineering Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dry cleaning apparatus
US 2759346 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Filed Dec. 20, 1954 Aug. 21, 1956 D. E. BEDUHN 7 2,759,346

DRY CLEANING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet l FILTER IN V EN TOR.

DAMEJ. E. BEDuHN BY Q2; Kain A-r-roauev Aug. 21, 1956 D. E. BEDUHN DRY CLEANING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 20, 1954 INVENTOR. Dame. E. Baum-m Aug. 21, 1956 D. E. BEDUHN DRY CLEANING APPARATUS I5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 20, 1954 Iii R I- I m x m 3m $0 5 MN/ V m mm 1 PM ew mm r/ /1414 A r W Z DAMEL E. Beam-m A-r-raauav United States Patent Q DRY CLEANING APPARATUS Daniel E. Bedulm, Manitowocg. Wis'., assignor' to ll lani towoc Engineering @orporati'on, Manitowoc, Wis.

Application December 20, 1.954,, SeriaI NO. 476,107

Claims. (Cl. 68--18) This invention relates to dry cleaningapparatus.

Indry cleaning apparatus it is the customary practice to use two solutions, one of which hereinafter referred to as the cleaning fluid or liquid contains a solvent to which water and soap have been added and the other of which is substantially pure solvent. It is the usual pracrice to distill the rinsing liquid after it has been used a predetermined length of time and thus separate the clear solvent from the soap to the desired degree so that as a net result substantially clear solvent can be obtained with not more than one-half of one percent remaining soap.

From the above it is apparent that it is highly desirable to prevent mixingof the cleaning and rinsing liquids during the drycleaning operation so that the rinse liquid or clear solvent will not have an unnecessary amount of soap therein.

Filters are also provided primarily for removing the floating or entrained insoluble particles that are suspended irr the solvent.

Heretotore the maintaining of the liquids separate and distinct without allowing one liquidto with the other is obtained by reliance on the integrity of valves and of a system controlled directly by valves. In the heretofore known typesoi dry cleaning devices a leaking valve will cause undesirable and unwanted mixingof the liquids.

This: invention is designed to overcome. the above noted defects: and objects of this invention are to provide a dry cleaning apparatus which is so arranged that the integrity of the valves: is not relied; upon to maintain separation of the liquids throughout the operation of the apparatus but in which even though a valve leaks it will cause no mixing of the liquids as the apparatus is. so arranged that reliance does not have to be placed. upon the integrity oi: the valves.

In specific detail objects of this invention. are to provide av tWOi liquid dry cleaning apparatus in which the first solvent or liquid is employed as, a washing liquid and the second solvent or liquid is employed as a rinsing solvent, and in which the valves are: so related to the remaining portions of the apparatus; that. although a. continuous separation process is followed, nevertheless, discharge of either liquid is selectively controlled by the opening of the appropriate valve so that flow of the desired liquid into. the washing drum occurs only when the appropriate valve is open and in no case is reliance placed upon the: closing of a valve to prevent flow of liquid into the washing drum.v

Further specific objects of this invention are to provide a back-up portion of the piping or of a component portion of the system in advance of the corresponding valve, so that when the-valve is closed continuously flowing' liquid is backed-up and is discharged into the washing drum, and in which when the valve is opened the continuously flowing liquid is discharged into the appropriate storage tank or compartment.

Further objects are to provide a dry cleaning apparatus in which the selective or sequential use of the liqice uids and discharge of the used liquids into the appropriate storage tank or compartment and control of centrifugal extraction is automatically controlled or manually controlled in a systematic or regular sequence.

A further object is to provide for the free and smooth flow of discharged liquid from the dump valve or main discharge valve from the washer housing into the appropriate storage compartment so that there can be no splashing, or backing-up or side overflow of the liquid into the wrong compartment.

An embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a front view of the machine with parts broken away.

Figure 2 is an end view with parts broken away.

Figure 3 is a perspective fragmentary sectional view.

Figure 4 is an enlarged view partly in section of the dump valve and diverter.

Figure 5 is a sectional view on the line 55 of Figure 4.

Figure 6 is an enlarged sectional detail showing the right-hand valve of Figure 3 such view showing the valve in open position in full lines and in closed position indotted lines.

Referring to the drawings particularly Figure 1, it will be seen that the washer generally is indicated by the reference character it? and comprises a washer housing 11 and a rotary perforated washer drum 12. The drum may have one or more compartments and is provided with one or more doors 13 which may be locked in any suitable manner. The housing is provided with a door M- which may be locked in any suitable manner.

On opposite sides of the housing, filters 15 and i=6 are positioned and may be of the usual construction in which l'ullers earth or diatomaceous earth is used in conjunction with filtering bags. Other types of filters could be used. The washer housing 11 and the filter tanks or filters 15. and 16 rest upon a base portion indicated generally by the reference character 17' which is divided into two storage compartments 18 and 19'.

Continuously running centrifugal pumps 20 and 21 are provided and draw liquid from the tanks 18 and 19 and discharge the liquids through pipes 22 and 23' continuously into the upper portion of the filters 15 and 16, respectively. The lower portion of the filters are provided with discharge pipes 24 and 25, respectively, which extend upwardly and are looped downwardly to prevent siphoning when the apparatus is not in use. The discharge portions or back-up portions of the discharge pipes 24- and 25 are enlarged and are indicated at 26 and 27.. They are provided with normally open, back-up valves 28 and 29, respectively, which are controlled by means of an actuating rod or shift rod 30. The valves 28 and 29 are biased open and may be of any general well-known type such as that shown in section in Figure 6 for the righthand valve 28. The valves 23 and 29 are butterfly valves and are each provided with a movable internally located vane 31 as may be seen from Figure 6. The internal vanes of the valves 28 and 29 are rigidly connected to arms 32 and 33-, respectively, and as stated are. spring urged or biased towards open position. A suitable stop, notshown, is provided. toarrest the vane in open position. The arms 32 and 33 are provided with pins 34 and 35, see Figure 3, which fit within slots 36 and 37, respectively, in the actuating bar or control rod 30 whose position is controlled from a motor driven, reduction gear, cam mechanism indicated generally at 38 in Figure 1. The rod or control bar 30 is connected to the cam mec anism by means of a flexible wire 39 slidable in a sheath 40. The cam mechanism 38 also controls the position of a dump valve or discharge valve indicated generally by the reference character 41 III. Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5.

The dump valve normally remains in closed position and is raised or lowered as stated by means of the cam mechanism 38. The dump valve or washer discharge valve 41 also constitutes an overflow valve as may be seen from Figures 2 and 3. This valve is provided with an upwardly extending standpipe-like member 42 which at its lower end terminates in the movable portion 43 of the valve. This standpipe and discharge or dump valve form a unitary structure and are raised or lowered as described. The valve 43 is of metal and rests upon a O-shaped resilient sealing ring 44 carried in the valve seat 45 and constituting a part thereof as may be seen from Figure 3. The valve seat extends downwardly and is provided with a rectangular lower opening 46 defined by a downwardly hanging or projecting rectangular flange or lip 47. The above described construction is most clearly shown in Figures 3, 4 and 5. A curved diverter 48 is provided and is equipped with end flanges 49. The diverter has a curved or rounded body portion which is equipped with offset or deflected portions 48A and 48B which coact with the rectangular flange or lip 47 of the valve seat 45 and thus provides a smooth continuation of the inner surface of the rectangular flange or lip 47 so that there can be no splashing from the discharged liquid. The diverter is rigid with a rockshaft 59, see Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5. The rockshaft 50 extends outwardly from an inner rectangular casing 51 which is secured to the bottom part of the washer housing 11. A partition 52 extends across the base or storage tank portion 17 and divides the storage tank into two compartments 18 and 19 as previously described. This partition 52 is provided with a top bar 53 which extends transversely across the subhousing or lower housing 51 as shown in Figures 3 and 5. Openings 54 and 55 are provided on opposite sides of the partition 52 as shown in Figure so that the liquid from the washer housing 11 can be discharged selectively into either storage tank 18 or 19 by rocking the diverter from one side to the other, that is to say, from the full line position to the dotted line position as shown in Figure 5.

The diverter rockshaft 50 is provided with a control arm 56 at its outer end which in turn is provided with a pin 57 grooved as indicated at 58. The pin 57 is located between downwardly projecting fingers 59 carried by the control rod or reciprocatory rod 30 and an overcenter spring 60 is secured to a stationary portion 61 at its lower end and at its upper end fits within the groove 58 of the pin 57 and thus biases the rock arm to one side or the other and causes a quick snap action of the rock arm when it is rocked due to the oscillation of the control bar or rod 30.

The perforated washer drum 12 is carried by a rotary shaft 62 which extends outwardly from the washer housing and is provided with a driven pulley or drive member 63 connected to a driving pulley 64 of amotor 65. The motor is controlled by means of a switch 66 which is in turn controlled by the cam mechanism indicated generally at 38.

In using the apparatus, assuming that the washing drum has received the charge of clothes or fabric hereinafter referred to as clothes, the door or doors for the drum are locked closed and the outer door for the housing is locked closed. Thereafter the washing drum is started revolving at the desired rate for washing and the valve 28 is closed. This causes the washing liquid to backup into the back-up portion 26 and to discharge into the washer housing. The washing liquid flows continuously into the washing housing and its height within the housing is controlled by the standpipe portion 42 of the dump valve 41. Washing continues for a predetermined time and thereafter the valve 28 is opened and the dump valve or discharge valve 41 is opened. This stops further flow of washing liquid to the washer housing and allows the discharge of all of the liquid from the washer housing into the storage tank 18 for the washing liquid.

The rate of rotation of the washing drum is speeded up so as to provide for centrifugal extraction of the major part of the washing liquid. Thereafter the rotation of the washing drum is slowed down to the desired point and the dump valve or discharge valve 41 is closed. It is to be noted that while the washing liquid is being discharged from the washer housing that the diverter 48 is in the position shown in Figure l and the washing liquid is thereby deflected or diverted into the storage tank 18 for such washing liquid.

The automatic control mechanism causes the closing of the valve 29 which causes the rinse liquid to backup into the back-up portion 27 and to discharge into the washer housing.

The diverter 48 is rocked to the dotted line position shown in Figure 5, and the rinse liquid is thereby diverted into the rinse storage tank 19. Rinsing continues for the desired length of time and thereafter the valve 29 is automatically opened and the dump valve 41 raised. The rotation of the washer drum is speeded up and centrifugal extraction takes place. This continues for the desired length of time and thereafter rotation of the washing drum is stopped thereby allowing the operator to remove the clothes and recharge the washing drum with the next charge of soiled clothes.

It is to be noted that the overcenter spring of the diveter causes the diverter 48 to snap or quickly rock from one position to the other. Also it is to be particularly noted that the offset edge portions 48A and 48B of the diverter 48 engage the outer surface of the elongated sides of the rectangular lip 47. The inner surface of the diverter forms in effect a smooth and substantially unbroken continuation of the inner surface of the corresponding elongated side portion of the lip 47. The flow of discharge liquid is therefore smooth and is not interrupted in any manner. Instead, the discharged liquid flows over the diverter 48 in a flat sheet into the appropriate tank and does not build up at the sides of the diverter nor does it back up on the diverter. The discharge of the liquid therefore into the appropriate storage tank is accomplished without splashing and without unwanted eddies.

Control of the dry cleaning apparatus may not be automatic but could be manual if desired, as shown in dotted lines in Figure 2. Ordinarily, the control is automatic and the control cams are driven from a synchronous motor or other type of motor through reduction gearing and thus automatically control the operation of the several portions of the dry cleaning apparatus in a regular and predetermined sequence.

Although this invention has been described in considerable detail, it is to be understood that such description is intended as illustrative rather than limiting, as the invention may be variously embodied and is to be interpreted as claimed.

I claim:

1. Dry cleaning apparatus comprising a washer housing, a washer drum, means for rotating said drum, a washing liquid filter, a rinse liquid filter, a washing liquid storage tank, a rinse liquid storage tank, a dump valve for the discharge of liquid from said Washer housing, a single means for selectively conveying the discharged liquid to the corresponding storage tank, a pair of continuously running pumps for drawing liquid from said tanks and forcing such liquid through the corresponding filter, discharge pipes for conducting liquid from said filters into said tanks, a normally open back-up valve in each of said discharge pipes for causing liquid to back-up in said discharge pipes when said back-up valves are closed, interlocking control means for selectively closing said back-up valves, and means for conducting the backed-up liquid into said Washer housing.

2. Dry cleaning apparatus comprising a washer housing, a Washer drum, means for rotating said drum, a washing liquid filter, a rinse liquid filter, a washing liquid storage tank, a rinse liquid storage tank, a dump valve for the discharge of liquid from said washer housing, a single means for selectively conveying the discharged liquid to the corresponding storage tank, a pair of continuously running pumps for drawing liquid from said tanks and forcing such liquid through the corresponding filter, discharge pipes for conducting liquid from said filters into said tanks, a normally open back-up valve in each of said discharge pipes for causing liquid to back-up in said discharge pipes when said back-up valves are closed, interlocking control means for selectively closing said back-up valves, and pipes communicating with said discharge pipes at a point above said back-up valves and leading into said washer housing.

3. In a dry cleaning apparatus, a washer housing, a washer drum in said housing, a washing liquid storage tank, a rinse liquid storage tank, means including pumps and a pair of pipes for providing a liquid circulating path from each of said tanks back into the corresponding tank, each of said pipes having a back-up portion, a back-up valve in each back-up portion directly controlling the flow of liquid to said washer housing, means biasing said valves open, means for selectively alternately closing and opening said valves, delivery pipes leading from said backup portions in advance of said valves and opening into said housing, and means for selectively conducting liquid from said washer housing into the corresponding tank.

4. In a dry cleaning apparatus, a washer housing, a washer drum in said housing, a washing liquid storage tank, a rinse liquid storage tank, means including pumps and a pair of pipes for providing a liquid circulating path from each of said tanks back into the corresponding tank, each of said pipes having a back-up portion, a back-up valve in each back-up portion, means biasing said valves open, means for selectively closing said valves, upwardly extending delivery pipes leading from said back-up portions in advance of said valves and opening into said housing at a point above the point at which said delivery pipes join said back-up portions, and means for selectively conducting liquid from said washer housing into the corresponding tank.

5. In a dry cleaning apparatus, a washer housing, a washer drum in said housing, a washing liquid storage tank, a rinse storage tank, means including pumps and a pair of pipes for providing a liquid circulating path from each of said tanks back into the corresponding tank, each of said pipes having a back-up portion, a back-up valve in each back-up portion, means biasing said valves open, means for selectively closing said valves, upwardly extending delivery pipes leading from said back-up portions in advance of said valves and opening into said housing at a point above the point at which said delivery pipes joint said back-up portions, and means for selectively conducting liquid from said washer housing into the corresponding tank, said last mentioned means including a discharge portion for said washer housing and a curved rocking diverter for conducting the discharged liquid into the corresponding tank, said discharge portion having a downwardly projecting lip, and said diverter having offset marginal portions for engaging the outer sides of said lip with the inner surface of said diverter forming a smooth continuation of the inner surface of said lip.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,630,694 Creswick Mar. 10, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2630694 *Feb 16, 1949Mar 10, 1953American Laundry Mach CoDry cleaning system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3035428 *Aug 10, 1959May 22, 1962Curtis Richard ADry cleaner apparatus
US3269539 *Feb 19, 1964Aug 30, 1966Gen Motors CorpApparatus and method for conditioning dry cleaning solvent
US4712392 *Dec 27, 1985Dec 15, 1987Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaDry cleaning apparatus
US4765159 *Jul 10, 1987Aug 23, 1988Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaController for a dry cleaning apparatus
US4802253 *Aug 25, 1987Feb 7, 1989Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaDry cleaning method using at least two kinds of solvents
US4912793 *Jul 24, 1989Apr 3, 1990Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaDry cleaning method and apparatus
US5056174 *Jan 30, 1990Oct 15, 1991Mitsubishi Jukogyo K.K.Dry cleaning method and apparatus
US7520013 *Dec 19, 2005Apr 21, 2009University Of Florida Research Foundation, Inc.Process for enhanced liquid extraction from fabrics
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/18.00F
International ClassificationD06F43/02, D06F43/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06F43/02
European ClassificationD06F43/02