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Publication numberUS2759658 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1956
Filing dateJan 13, 1954
Priority dateJan 13, 1954
Publication numberUS 2759658 A, US 2759658A, US-A-2759658, US2759658 A, US2759658A
InventorsSawdon Victor J
Original AssigneeSawdon Victor J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Envelopes
US 2759658 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1, 1956 v. J. SAWDON 2,759,658

ENVELOPES Filed Jan. 13, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l JIM/54457 Aug. 21, 1956 v. J. SAWDON ENVELOPES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 13, 1954 J m W m M M Z 1 my United States Patent ENVELOPES Victor J. Sawdon, New York, N. Y.

Application January 13, E54, Serial No. 403,829

4 Claims. (Cl. 229-73) This invention relates to envelopes and more particularly to a combined folder, letter or circular and outgoing and return envelope.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a low cost, single unit combination outgoing envelope, printed message and detachable return envelope or plain envelope without printing.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a combination outgoing envelope, printed message and return envelope consisting of a single form which is designed to be delivered to the customer printed, folded, sealed and ready for addressing, and which may also be delivered not printed.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a combination outgoing envelope, printed message and return envelope which is particularly adapted for the economical collection of delinquent accounts, for soliciting magazine and newspaper subscriptions, for charitable appeals, mail order sales, soliciting information by mail and in general for use wherever a two part envelope works to the advantage of the addresser.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a combination outgoing envelope, printed message and return envelope which can be manufactured either in single or multiple units, which latter may be split apart for single unit delivery or alternately perforated and delivered as a multiple unit to the customer, in which case the multiple units may be addressed simultaneously in sets for immediate and future mailing in the event that a reply is not received from the first, second or other multiple mailings.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a combination outgoing envelope, printed message and return envelope wherein the recipients address appearing on the outgoing envelope also serves as a return address when the return envelope is detached, sealed and mailed by the recipient to the addresser.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide a combination outgoing envelope, printed message and detachable return envelope wherein the rear face of the outgoing envelope is adapted to contain advertising matter or the like.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide a combined outgoing envelope, printed message and detachable return envelope bearing the above objects in mind which is of simple construction, inexpensive to manufacture, fabricated from a single unit, easy to use,

and efficient in achieving its intended purpose.

For other objects and a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a front perspective view of the invention shown folded and sealed for mailing as an outgoing envelope;

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

ice

Figure 3 is a perspective view looking from the rear of Fig. 1;

Figure 4 is an outside perspective view of the invention after it has been received by the addressee and opened;

Figure 5 is an inside perspective view of the invention after it has been opened by the addressee and showing the manner of detaching the return envelope portion prior to return mailing;

Figure 6 is a rear perspective view of the invention after the letter portion has been completely detached, the invention now being used as a return envelope and sealed for mailing;

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line 77 of Fig. 6;

Figure 8 is a front perspective view of the invention used as a return envelope and just prior to mailing;

Figure 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified form of the invention; and

Figure 10 is a transverse sectional view taken along the line 10-10 of Fig. 9.

The invention generally comprises an outgoing envelope and a folder or circular upon which the message to the addressee is printed, the parts being detachably connected or in one solid piece not for detaching and adapted to be folded together to completely conceal the returnable envelope portion, permitting the device to be mailed with the addressees name appearing on the outside of the folder. Upon receipt the addressee can detach the folder or printed message from the envelope portion, which latter may be sent out self-addressed, or left blank and the address filled in on the return envel ope portion, and then employ the same in the usual manner to return the necessary remittance or information to the addresser. The original name and address of the addressee which appears on the outside of the folder portion is then used as a return address in a convenient manner.

Referring now more in detail to the drawing wherein similar reference numerals identify corresponding parts throughout the several views, A represents a folder, circular, letter, order blank, questionnaire, bill, invoice or the like and B an envelope, the two being detachably secured along the perforated line 10. As shown in the drawing, the parts A and B are formed from a single unit of material, the same being suitably provided with perforated and fold lines in the manner shown.

More particularly, 11 represents the rear face of the envelope and 12 the front face thereof integral with the rear face 11 along the fold line 13, the free edge of the front face 12 being integrally formed with the flap 14 along the fold line 15. 16, 16 are flaps or extensions on one of the sides 11, 12 forming the ends of the envelope (Fig. 5). Although the envelope B is here shown as a side seam envelope, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that a center seam envelope may be similarly employed. Also, the envelope may be of the well known seamless construction or alternately one side of the envelope pocket may be seamless and the other side provided with the side seam or flap construction.

For convenience the faces of the device shown in Fig. 4 will be referred to as the outside faces while the faces of the device shown in Fig. 5 will be referred to as the inside faces. The letter portion A may consist of any suitable number of parts arranged in any form and is provided on its inner face with the message or letter which the addresser wishes the addressee to receive and act upon. This letter portion may also comprise an order blank or inquiry slip (which latter may be detached along perforated line 10 and enclosed in the envelope B). The letter A is shown provided with a fold line 17, as well as a single gum spot 18 for third class mailing. Alternately, the inner face of letter portion A along its free edge may be provided with a continuous line of mucilage, not shown, permitting the device to :be sent by first class mail, or again it may be secured by a staple, gummed label or the like.

In Fig. 2 is shown the preferred way of folding the device for outgoing envelope use, and it will be noted that the envelope B is completely enclosed by the letter A and flap 14, the flap 14 being folded back across the adjacent face of the envelope B. On the outer face of the flap 14 is placed the address 319 of the one who is to receive the letter (Fig. 4), the addressers name and address being printed on the outer face of the letter A and indicated at 20. A printed postal permit or stamp, not shown, is provided alongside of the return address 20, while suitable advertisement 22 is provided on the outer face of the letter A on the other side of the fold line 1-7. The addressers name and address is printed on the front face 12 of envelope B, as at 23, along with a stamp receiving portion 24. The inner face of the flap 14 is provided with a continuous line of mucilage 25 and printed matter 26, while the rear face 11 is provided with the Word from indicated at 27.

Ordinarily the printed matter on the inside of letter A, the printed matter 26, 27, 23, 24, 2t 21 and 22 are printed or photo offset before delivery to the customer, while the address 19 is typed in after delivery and before mailing to the addressee.

In order that the use of the device may be clearly understood, let us assume that the letter A and envelope B of Figs. 1 through are sent out by the addresser in the form of a letter. The letter A and envelope B are then folded as shown in Figs. 1 through 3 with the name and address H of the addressee on the outside, this information being typed on, printed, automatically addressed by mechanical equipment or addresed by hand, just prior to sending. It will be noted that all other descriptive matter is printed or photo-offset during manufacture so that it is necessary for the addresser to only type in the address 19 and to seal the spot 18. The device is then mailed and upon receipt by the addressee, the seal 18 is broken and the device opened as shown in Fig. 4. The letter A is then read and detached along the perforated line 10, as shown in Fig. 5. The check or other remittance required is then deposited in the envelope B, whereupon the mucilage 25 is moistened to seal the envelope as shown in Figs. 6, 7 and 8 for first class mailing. The flap 14 may be tucked inside the envelope if it is desired to effect an economy of postage. The envelope B is then provided with the stamp 28 (if not already provided) and mailed. it will be noted that the only operations necessary on the part of the addressee are the detaching of the letter portion A, the depositing of the remittance within the envelope, sealing the latter along the line 25 and placing stamp 2% thereon. It will be particularly noted that the address 19 appearing on the outer face of flap 14 now serves as a return address in cooperation with the word from previously printed on the back face 11 of envelope 5% (Fig. 6). Instead of the stamp 23, the postal permit 21 may be provided thereon. Thus, the return envelope may be sent back to the addresser without requiring any writin at all on the part of the addressee.

It should now be apparent that by attaching the ad dressed envelope B to the letter A there is provided a previously addressed return envelope for the addressee. This convenience facilitates payment on the part of the addressee as well as avoiding collection expenses on the part of the addresser.

The entire unit may be manufactured separately or in multiples which may be split apart for single unit delivery to the customer or alternately perforated and delivered as multiple units. This latter arrangement permits the multiple units to be addressed simultaneously in sets for immediate future mailing in the event that a reply has not been received from the first, second or additional mailings.

The outgoing envelope may, of course, be provided with an open face or a transparent patch window, not shown, and may be mailed as either first or third class mail, or other classifications according to existing Postal Laws and Regulations, as desired. The return envelope part of the device (Figs. 6 through 8) may be printed with the conventional Business Reply Envelope copy or Place Stamp Here message. In the latter case, the addressee pays the return postage.

In the foregoing description, XXX Company has been referred to as the addresser and John Doe as the addressee. However, when the envelope portion B is detached and mailed, the XXX Company becomes the addressee and John Doe the addresser, as will be obvious.

The detachable return envelope B may, of course, be connected to letter A by a machine perforation, a broken rule printed or offset impression, score line or any combination of the foregoing.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 9 and 10, there is shown a modified form of the present invention wherein the combination out-going envelope, printed message and return envelope units are manufactured in multiple units which are detaehably connected to each other along per forated lines and are delivered as a multiple unit to the customer, permitting these multiple units to be addressed simultaneously in sets for immediate and future mailing in the event that a reply is not received from the first, second or-other multiple mailings.

Each of the single units comprises a folder, circular, letter, order blank, questionnaire, bill, invoice or'the like, A, and an envelope B, the two being detachablysecured together along the perforated line 14). As shown in the drawing, the parts A and B are formed from a single blank of material, the same being suitably provided with perforated and fold lines in the manner shown, and connected to adjacent single units by the perforated lines 30.

More particularly, 11' represents the rear face of .the envelope and 12' the front face thereof, integral with the rear face 11 along the fold line 13'. The free edge of the front face 12 is integrally formed with the flap 14' along the fold line 15.

In this form of the invention, the envelopes B are of the seamless construction, mucilage strips 31 being provided on each side of the perforated lines 36 intermediate the front and rear faces of the envelopes. Thus, the multiple units are manufactured from a single blank and the mucilage strips 31 applied thereto, whereupon the rear faces 11 are folded upwardly as a unit and secured to the front face 12, the multiple units then being delivered to the customer in the form shown in Fig. 9. The units may then be separated by tearing the same along the perforated lines 38 in the manner shown.

To facilitate the insertion of a check or the like into the return envelope, the rear face 1-1 is now provided with a cut out portion 32.

For convenience, the face of the device shown in Fig. 9 will be referred to as the inside face. The letter portion A may consist of any suitable number of parts or arranged in any form and is provided again in its inner face with the message or letter which the addresser wishes the addressee to receive and act upon. This lotter portion may also comprise an order blank or inquiry slip (which latter may be detached along perforated line 10 and enclosed in the envelope B). The latter A is shown provided with a fold line 17, as well as a single gum spot 18' for third class mailing.

On the outer face of the flap 14' is placed the address, not shown, of the one who is to receive the letter, the addressers return name-and address being likewise printed on the outer face of the letter A as in the first form. A printed postal permit or stamp, not shown, is similarly provided alongside the addressers return address, while suitable advertising matter, not shown, is provided .on the outer face of the letter A on the other side of the fold line 17'. The addressers name and address is printed on the front face of the envelope B along with a stamp receiving portion, not shown. The inner face of the flap 14' is provided with a continuous line of mucilage 25' and printed matter 26', while the rear face M is provided with the word Fro'm, indicated at 27.

Thus the device is manufactured in multiples which are provided with the perforated lines 30, permitting the multiple units to be addressed simultaneously in sets for immediate future mailing in the event that a reply has not been received from the first, second or additional mailings.

In other respects, the use of the device of Figs. 9 and 10 is the same as that described in connection with the single units of Figs. 1 through 8.

It will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that the multiple units of Figs. 9 and 10 may be manufactured without the perforated lines 30, in which case the units will be split apart by the manufacturer for single unit delivery to the customer.

While various changes may be made in the detail construction, it shall be understood that such changes shall be within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is:

.1. In an article of the charadter described the combination of an envelope comprising a front address side and a rear side connected thereto, said sides being separated from one another along their upper edges to form a pocket, at flap projecting from the upper edge .of the front side of the envelope provided with a horizontally extending fold line substantially midway between the upper and lower edges of said flap, said flap being of a width substantially coextensive with the width of the envelope and of a length to fold entirely around the rear side and substantially entirely around the front side of said envelope, an adhesive area disposed substantially midway between said lower edge of said flap and said fold line, a weakened tear line horizontally disposed adjacent the upper edge of said adhesive area, and an address positioned on said flap below the weakened tear l-ine serving as both the original mailing address and as the recipients return address.

2. In an envelope as described in claim 1, said front side directly adhesively attached to said rear side.

3. In an article of the charaoter described, a single form made up of multiple uni-ts defined in claim 1 connected together by weakened tear lines.

-4. In an envelope as described in claim 1, the original senders return address being positioned on said flap above the weakened tear line and means positioned on said rear side for identifying the original recipients return address when the upper portion of said flap is torn off along the weakened tear line and the envelope is folded for return sending.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 673,417 Brown May 7, 1901 1,089,486 Levine Mar. 10, 1914 1,324,100 Binkowitz Dec. 9, 1919 1,957,704 Drachman May 8, 1934 2,402,821 Kosteling June 25, 19446 FOREIGN PATENTS 4,313 Great Britain Jan. 23, 1-902

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2833400 *Apr 23, 1956May 6, 1958Ivers Lee CoCombined package and mailing cover
US2895664 *Aug 15, 1956Jul 21, 1959Cone James EMailing and return device
US2907514 *Oct 27, 1955Oct 6, 1959Columbia Envelope CompanyReturn envelope mailing piece
US2910222 *Mar 18, 1957Oct 27, 1959Columbia Envelope CompanyReturn envelope construction
US2956726 *Jun 18, 1958Oct 18, 1960Eastman Kodak CoReceptacle for photographic prints and negatives
US3009465 *Jun 2, 1959Nov 21, 1961Binder Corp Of AmericaLoose-leaf binder
US3113716 *Aug 1, 1961Dec 10, 1963Howard James EMailing device
US3131854 *Jul 12, 1961May 5, 1964Herman DeutschmeisterMultiple intelligence transmission means
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EP1670686A2 *Aug 27, 2004Jun 21, 2006Gamefly, Inc.System and apparatus for protecting digital media
WO1996021598A1 *Jan 10, 1996Jul 18, 1996Rexam Australia Pty. LimitedReusable envelopes
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/305
International ClassificationB42D15/08
Cooperative ClassificationB42D15/08
European ClassificationB42D15/08