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Publication numberUS2760556 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1956
Filing dateMay 14, 1953
Priority dateMay 14, 1953
Publication numberUS 2760556 A, US 2760556A, US-A-2760556, US2760556 A, US2760556A
InventorsBror W Henrikson, Alfred C Hoven, Walter E Nordmark, Benjamin J Oom
Original AssigneeAmerican Seating Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chair structure
US 2760556 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

8, 1956 B. w. HENRIKSON ET AL 2,760,556

CHAIR STRUCTURE Filed May 4, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTORS Alfred C .HowJe'n 5 Bror Wfienrilifon Wali-et' fi-Nordmaz'li in I 00m Benjam A? fif'fl-dddC/K ATTORNEY Aug. 28, 1956 5. w HENRIKSON ET AL 2,760,556

CHAIR STRUCTURE Filed May 14, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 I .INVENTOR Bro! W-Henrzlidon Alfred L. Haven Will-Fer E. Novella-ark By Benjamin 1 00121.

Aug. 28, 1956 E. w. HENRIKSON ET A 2,750,556

CHAIR STRUCTURE Filed May 14, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR Bror WH'enz-zli-son Alfred C. .H'ozJen 35 6111122 E. Nordmavh' .Ben 'amin J: 00222 Madam ATTORNEY 8, 1956 B. w. HENRIKSON ET AL CHAIR STRUCTURE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 14, 1953 INVENTOR ,Bror W Henriliann Alfred C. Hoflen.

FVizZl-er E.N0rclmark:

% flMdM ATTORNEY United States atent C 2,760,556 CHAIR STRUCTURE Bror W. Henrikson, Alfred C. Hoven, Walter E. Nordmark, and Benjamin J. on1, Grand Rapids, Mich, assignors to American Seating Company, Grand Rapids, Mich, a corporation of New Jersey Application May 14, 1953, Serial No. 354,938

3 Claims. (Cl. 155-416) The present invention relates to chair structures and more particularly to such structures of the recliner type commonly installed in motorbusses, railway cars, airplanes and other vehicles.

The primary objects of the invention are to provide an improved chair of the recliner type which is simple and lightweight in construction but nevertheless sturdy; to provide such a chair structure in which two chairs are supported upon a common supporting frame one end of which is mounted on a side wall of the vehicle and the other end of which comprises an end or aisle standard of improved construction; to provide such a recliner from which the seats may be removed for reupholstering, and from which the seat covers and the back covers may readily be removed for cleaning; to provide an improved footrest for such a chair structure; and in general to provide such a structure which is eflicient in use, reasonably economical in manufacture and attractive in appearance.

An illustrative embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a front elevational view of a reclining chair structure installed in a vehicle and provided with individual seats and backs for two passengers, mounted on a common supporting frame;

Figure 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the same;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary view thereof shown partly in side elevation and partly in vertical section taken on line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a side elevational view of one of the removable seat cushions, per se;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary bottom plan of the seat cushion, the upholstery cover therefor being omitted in this view;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of parts of the seat cushion taken on line 66 of Figure 4;

Figure 7 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of other parts of the seat cushion taken on line 7-7 of Figure 4;

Figure 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the end or aisle standard of the structure and parts adjacent thereto, the plane of section being indicated by lines 88 of Figures 1 and 9;

Figure 9 is a vertical sectional view of the same taken on line 99 of Figure 8;

Figure 10 is a horizontal sectional view of parts of the same taken on line 110 of Figure 9;

Figure 11 is a horizontal sectional View of other parts of the same taken on line 1111 of Figure 9;

Figure 12 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of parts of the same taken on line 12-12 of Figure 9;

Figure 13 is a rear elevational view of a chair back of the structure, shown per se and with portions thereof broken away; and

Figure 14 is a vertical sectional view of said chair back taken on line 14-14 of Figure 13.

Referring now in detail to these drawings wherein like fit parts are designated by the same numerals in the several views, the chair structure there shown generally comprises a supporting frame on which two individual chairs each having a seat 15 and back 16 are mounted for independent reclinin'g movements. The supporting frame comprises a Wall standard 17 which is secured to the side wall 1% of the vehicle in which the structure is installed and which rests on a shoulder 19 of said side wall, an end standard 20 disposed at the aisle side of the chair structure, front and rear' horizontally disposed tubular supporting bars 21 and 22 respectively, and a tubular center brace 23 extending rearwardly from the front bar 21 to the rear bar 22 and thence upwardly (see Figure 3). These parts of the supporting frame are all secured together as by means of welding.

The chair backs 16 are pivotally mounted on horizontally aligned bearing studs 24 secured to the wall standard 17, the end standard 20 and the upper end of the center brace 23. Referring now particularly to Figures 13 and 14, each chair back is built upon a generally rectangular tubular metal frame consisting of an inverted U-shaped tubular frame member 25. The lower ends of the legs of said member 25 are flattened as at 26 and provided with socket bearing members 27 which receive the studs 24 for pivotally mounting the chair backs on the supporting frame. Below the socket bearing members 27 the flattened lower ends of the frame member 25 are connected by a horizontal rod, tube or bar 28 welded thereto. Each chair backs frame member 25 has a further downward extension 29 at that side of the back nearest a standard 17 or 20, which extension 29 is pivotally connected to a recliner latch mechanism one of which is generally designated 30 and shown somewhat diagrammatically in dotted lines in Figure l. The latch mechanism for each chair back is housed in the adjacent standard 17 or 20 and serves to secure the back in selected reclined position. However, inasmuch as the specific form of latch mechanism is not a part of the present invention, it is not shown nor described herein in specific detail.

Referring again to Figures 13 and 14, each chair back 16 has a sheet of expanded metal 31 secured to and enclosed by the tubular rectangular frame of the back, said sheet 31 being secured as by welding to the frames members 25 and 28. Sheets 32 and 33 of heavy cardboard are secured by suitable adhesives to the front and rear surfaces respectively of the metal sheet 31. A foam rubber cushion 34 is disposed over the front surface of the sheet 32 and secured thereto, and a pre-sewn upholstery cover 35 in the form of an envelope is then applied over this entire assembly. A slide fastener 36 closes the mouth of the upholstery envelope at the bot-v tom of the back, and it will be seen that this upholstery cover can easily be removed for cleaning. The resulting chair back is thus convenient in use, light in weight and attractive in appearance.

Each chair seat 15 comprises a base board 37 (see Figures 3-7) over which is disposed a foam rubber cushion 38. Brackets 39 are secured to the rear corners of the base board 37 as by means of rivets 40 passing through flanges in the brackets, through the base board and through an auxiliary plate ill adjacent the upper surface of the base board 37. These brackets extend rearwardlyupwardly and are provided at their upper ends with rearwardly opening notches 42 adapted to detachably engage the rod or tube 28 which constitutes the lower part of the frame of the chair back. By this means the rear of the seat 15 is pivotally connected to the back 16 below the backs pivotal mountings on the supporting frame of the structure, and spring clips 43 pivotally mounted on the upper ends of the brackets 39 are turnable from their positions indicated in Figure 4 to their positions shown 3 in Figures 2 and 3 for yieldingly securing the brackets 39 to the tube or rod 28 of the back.

Seat-supporting levers 44 are pivotally connected to plates 45 secured to the underside of the base board 37 of the seat by means of rivets 46 passing through the plates 45, through the base board and through an auxiliary plate 47 adjacent the upper surface of the base board. These levers 44, at opposite sides of the seat and intermediate the front and rear thereof, extend forwardlydownwardly from the seat and are provided with sockets 48 which pivotally engage the rounded upper surface of: the front tubular supporting bar 21. The levers 44 are detachably connected to said bar 21 by means of spring clips 49 pivotally secured thereto, which clips may be turned from their positions indicated in Figure 4 to their positions shown in Figures 2 and 3 wherein they engage the under surface of the supporting bar 21.

The seat is provided with an upholstery covering 59 which may be similar to the covering 35 for the back, i. e. in the form of an envelope provided with a slide fastener (not shown). Thus the covers of both the seat and the back are removable for cleaning. In addition the entire seat may be removed without disturbing the back.

It will be seen that as the upper part of the back is moved rearwardly from its position shown in solid lines in Figure 2 toward a more reclined position as illustrated in Figure 3 the lower part of the back and the seat are moved slightly forwardly, and at the same time the forward part of the seat is slightly elevated by the levers 44. When the back is returned to upright position, the seat is moved rearwardly and downwardly as before. These coordinated movements of the seat and back provide greater comfort for the chair occupant.

. The end standard 20 at the aisle side of the twopassenger seat is of novel construction providing attractive appearance, light weight and ease of assembly. The standard has an upright, forwardly-rearwardly disposed base element 51 of relatively heavy gauge sheet metal, the front and rear marginal edges of which are curled inwardly and welded to form reinforced supporting tubes 52, 53 respectively (see Figures 8-11). Inwardly extending, apertured bottom flanges 54, 55 are provided for attachment of the base to a vehicle floor as by means of bolts 56. A relatively light gauge decorative trim panel 57 of stainless steel or the like is disposed adjacent the outer surface of the base element 51 and has its front and rear marginal edges 58, 59 curled around those of the base element and secured thereto as by welding. The base element 51 and its outer trim panel 57 have registering slots 60, 61 respectively therethrough near their upper edges, and an illumination box 62 is mounted on the inner surface of the base element adjacent its slot 60. A light bulb 63 having suitable electrical connections is disposed in the box 62 and when energized throws light through the slots 60, 61 for illuminating the aisle adjacent the seat.

The end standard 20 has an upright forwardly-rearwardly disposed end element 64 likewise of relatively heavy gauge sheet metal and of generally open rectangular form having an inwardly extending peripheral flange 65 the horizontal bottom portion of which is secured as by welding to an upper, inwardly extending flange 66 on the base element 51 (see Figure 12). A relatively light gauge decorative trim panel 67, of polished aluminum or the like, is attached to the outer surface of the end element 64. This trim panel 67 has a peripheral flange 68, and is secured to the end element 64 at the bottom by hooking the horizontal bottom portion of flange 68 upwardly onto lugs 69 (see Figures 9, and 12) which are struck outwardly from the end element 64. The upper part of the trim panel 67 is secured to the end element 64 by means of a plate 70 having a marginal groove 71 (see Figure 12) behind which engages the upper and side portions of the panels flange 68, and the plate 70 is in turn secured to the end element 64 by 4' means of screws 72 passing through apertures in the end element and threaded into this plate 70.

An upright arm rest element is mounted on top of the end element 64. (See Figures 1, 2, 8 and 9.) The arm rest element comprises a generally inverted U-shaped, hollow member 73 fabricated of sheet metal and secured to the end element 64 as by welding, a molded plastic cap 74 fitted over the upper part of the hollow member 73 and provided with a recess 75 in its upper surface, and a wood block 76 covered with upholstery material 77 seated in said recess 75. These parts are all secured in assembly by wood screws 78 passing upwardly through apertures in the hollow member 73 and in the plastic cap 74, and threaded into the wood block 76.

A lever 79 is pivotally mounted in the upper forward part of the hollow member 73 (see Figure 9) and extends forwardly through a slot 80. and into a cavity 81 in the forward part of the plastic cap 74. A control button 82, also desirably of molded plastic is secured to the forward end of the lever 79 and extends downwardly through the open bottom of the plastic cap 74 so as to be within fingertip reach of the chair occupant. A link 83 connects the lever 79 to the recliner latch mechanism 30, and it will be seen that by this arrangement the chair occupant has fingertip control over the latch mechanism so that he may by pressing upwardly on the control button 82 unlatch the recliner mechanism so as to adjust the chair as desired. When the occupant releases the button 82, spring means within the latch mechanism automatically secure the chair in selected position.

Footrests are provided for the convenience of occupants of the chairs in the rear of the chair structure shown. Each footrest is suspended from a pair of horizontally spaced depending brackets 84 secured to the supporting frame of the structure as by welding. A pair of arms 85 are pivotally connected at 86 to the brackets 84 respectively, and a bar 87 connects the free ends of said arms. This bar 87 is preferably provided with a rubber sheath 88 and serves as the footrest proper. Means are provided for adjusting the height of the footrest from the floor. These means comprise a series of ratchet teeth 89, 90 on one of the arms 85 adjacent its bracket 84 (see Figure 3), a pawl 91 pivotally mounted on said bracket 84, and a spring 92 connected to the pawl and to the bracket which spring urges the pawl in a direction centering through the arm's pivotal connection at 86 to the bracket 84. Voids 93 and 94 at the opposite ends of the series of ratchet teeth 89, 90 permit reversal of the direction of the pawl when the footrest reaches its extreme raised and extreme lowered positions respectively. It will be seen that by this arrangement the pawl will always be positioned to engage the several ratchet teeth during elevation of the footrest but will ride freely over the ratchet teeth during lowering of the footrest. It will thus be seen that the invention provides a reclining chair structure having many features of novelty and utility, and while but one specific embodiment of the invention has been herein shown and described it will be understood that numerous details may be altered or omitted without departing from the spirit of the invention as the same is defined by the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a chair structure: a supporting frame having a tubular seat-supporting bar across the front thereof; a chair back pivotally mounted on the frame for movement about a horizontal axis between upright and variously reclined positions; a horizontal rod extending from side to side of the chair back below the backs pivotal mounting on the frame; a chair seat disposed forwardly of the chair back; brackets extending upwardly from the rear corners of the chair seat and provided with notches adapted to engage said rod for detachably and pivotally connecting the rear of the seat to the lower part of the back, whereby reclining movement of the backs upper part moves the backs lower part and the seat forwardly; seat-supporting levers pivotally connected to the underside of the seat at opposite sides thereof and intermediate the front and rear of the seat, said levers extending forwardly-downwardly from the seat and being provided with sockets adapted to detachably and pivotally engage the rounded upper surface of said tubular seat-supporting bar, whereby the forward part of the seat is elevated when the seat is moved forwardly and lowered when the seat is moved rearwardly.

2. In a chair structure: a supporting frame having a tubular seat-supporting bar across the front thereof; a chair back pivotally mounted on the frame for movement about a horizontal axis between upright and variously reclined positions; a horizontal rod extending from side to side of the chair back below the backs pivotal mounting on the frame; a chair seat disposed forwardly of the chair back; brackets extending upwardly from the rear corners of the chair back and provided with notches adapted to engage said rod for detachably and pivotally connecting the rear of the seat to the lower part of the back, whereby reclining movement of the backs upper part moves the backs lower part and the seat forwardly; spring clips secured to said brackets and turnable to positions yieldingly securing said brackets in engagement with said rod; seat-supporting levers pivotally connected to the underside of the seat at opposite sides thereof and intermediate the front and rear of the seat, said levers extending forwardly-downwardly from the seat and being provided with sockets adapted to detachably and pivotally engage the rounded upper surface of said tubular seatsupporting bar, whereby the forward part of the seat is elevated when the seat is moved forwardly and lowered when the seat is moved rearwardly; and other spring clips secured to said levers and turnable to positions yieldingly securing said levers to said tubular seat-supporting bar.

3. In a chair structure: a supporting frame having a tubular seat-supporting bar across the front thereof; a

chair back pivotally mounted on the frame for movement about a horizontal axis between upright and variously reclined positions; a chair seat disposed forwardly of the chair back; a bracket extending upwardly from the rear of the chair seat and having its upper end detachably and pivotally connected to the chair back below said backs pivotal connection to the frame, whereby reclining movement of the backs upper part moves the backs lower part and the seat forwardly; a seat-supporting lever pivotally connected to the underside of the seat intermediate the front and rear of the seat, said lever extending forwardly-downwardly from the seat and being provided with a socket detachably and pivotally engaging the rounded upper surface of said tubular seat-supporting bar, whereby the forward part of the seat is elevated when the seat is moved forwardly and lowered when the seat is moved rearwardly.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 705,075 Hale July 22, 1902 825,751 Old et al. July 10, 1906 1,964,519 Knudsen June 26, 1934 2,016,133 Chandler Oct. 1, 1935 2,217,352 Todd et al. Oct. 8, 1940 2,284,129 Caesar May 26, 1942 2,311,104 Will Feb. 16, 1943 2,311,105 Will Feb. 16, 1943 2,400,588 McArthur May 21, 1946 2,459,758 Flint Jan. 18, 1949 2,512,353 Magaldino et al. June 20, 1950 2,532,025 Johnson Nov. 28, 1950 2,679,285 Luckhardt t May 25, 1954 2,730,164 Higley et al Jan. 10, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 222,898 Great Britain Oct. 13, 1924 277,938 Switzerland Dec. 17, 1951

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2994363 *Jul 18, 1957Aug 1, 1961Seng CoReclining chair with extensible back
US4478454 *Jun 8, 1981Oct 23, 1984Steelcase Inc.Weight-actuated chair control
US4479679 *Jun 8, 1981Oct 30, 1984Steelcase Inc.Body weight chair control
US6161897 *Jun 3, 1999Dec 19, 2000Hon Technology Inc.Chair construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/321, 297/411.45, 297/DIG.100
International ClassificationB60N2/24
Cooperative ClassificationY10S297/01, B60N2/242
European ClassificationB60N2/24B