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Publication numberUS2760557 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1956
Filing dateMar 28, 1955
Priority dateMar 28, 1955
Publication numberUS 2760557 A, US 2760557A, US-A-2760557, US2760557 A, US2760557A
InventorsCharles Merriman Frederick, Jack Ratkowski
Original AssigneeCharles Merriman Frederick, Jack Ratkowski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible supporting chair
US 2760557 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1956 F. c. M ERRIMAN ETAL 2,760,557

COLLAPSIBLE SUPPORTING CHAIR Filed March 28, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TORS FREDERICK CHARLES MERRIMAN JACK RATKOWSKI ATTORNEYS 1956 F. c. MERRIMAN ETAL 2,760,557

COLLAPSIBLE SUPPORTING CHAIR Filed March 28, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS FREDERICK CHARLES MERRIMAN JggK RATKOWSKI ATTORNEYS United States Patent coLLArsmLn surronrmo CHAIR Frederick Charles Merriman and Jack Ratltowski, Nelson, British Columbia, Canada Application March 28, 1955, Serial No. 497,278

8 Claims. (Cl. 155- 154) This invention relates to a collapsible supporting chair which may be used on bleachers, benches and the ground.

There are many spectator sports during which people have to sit on benches or bleachers without any back rest. This collapsible chair is adapted to be placed on a bench or bleacher, and it provides a back rest that has a limited amount of adjustment. In addition to this, the chair may be placed on the ground so that a person in a park or on the beach can sit down on a clean surface and have a back rest. This back rest may be adjusted from substantially a vertical position to almost a horizontal position.

This supporting chair is designed so that it may be quickly and easily folded into a very compact bundle. The chair has a seat with a back hingedly connected thereto, and these may be folded to enclose all the mechanism that holds them in their normal operative positions.

A supporting chair according to the present invention comprises a seat having a back hingedly connected to the rear edge thereof, said back being movable to a position flat against the seat when the chair is not required and to a position substantially at right angles to said seat for use, bar means slidably mounted along the bottom of the seat and projecting beyond the rear edge thereof, and a support connected at its opposite ends to the adjacent end of the bar means and to the back near the top thereof. The bar means is movable relative to the seat to adjust the angle of the back to the latter. The seat is intended to be rested on a flat surface, such as a bench, bleacher or the ground, and in the preferred form of the invention the seat is provided with spacing means on its lower surface so that said seat is spaced a little above the surface upon which it rests. This provides space for the bar means and permits the latter to be moved relative to the seat. In addition to this, the hinges of the back are offset so that the back may be folded against the spacing means on the lower surface of the seat. Thus, the spacing means provides a space between the seat and back in which the bar means and the support are positioned when the chair is collapsed. It is preferable to provide suitable means for holding the seat and back in this collapsed position to maintain the chair in a neat bundle which may be con eniently carried or stored.

An example of this invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which,

Figure l is a front elevation of the collapsible supporting chair, ready for use,

Figure 2 is a plan view thereof,

Figure 3 is a back view of a portion of the chair,

Figure 4 is a vertical section taken substantially on the line 4-4 of Figure 1, showing the chair mounted on a bench or bleacher,

Figure 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 1,

Figure 6 is a horizontal section taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 4,

Figure 7 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the chair, and

Figure 8-is a section similar to Figure 4 only with the back folded into the collapsed position.

Referring to the drawings, 10 is a seat, and 11. is a back therefor. The back is connected at its lower edge 12 to the rear edge 13 of the seat by one or more hinges 14, there being tWo of these hinges shown in the illustrated example. Each hinge 14 is offset, that is, the hinge pin 15 thereof is offset or, spaced downwardly, seeFigureS, from the portion 1.6 thereof which is connected to the seat. When the supporting chair is in use, back 11. is maintained in a position substantially at right angles to seat 10, and the offset hinges permit said back to be swung around into a position against or parallel with the lower surface of the seat when the chair is not required. Back 11 may be provided with a hand hole 19 near the upper or outer edge thereof, see Figure l, and it also has a comparatively large recess 20 in its lower or inner edge substantially midway between its side edges.

Suitable means is provided for adjustably securing the back 11 in its normal position substantially at right angles to the seat. For this purpose, bar means is slidably mounted along the bottom of the seat. In this example, a bar 24 is slidably mounted on the lower or inner surface of the seat by means of loops 25 mounted on the latter. A finger grip 27 is formed on one end of the bar and projects downwardly therefrom, this grip being provided with a lug 28 which is spaced from and extends substantially parallel to the bar, see Figures 4 and 8. The opposite end of bar 24 is provided with an open loop 30 on the upper surface thereof, and a stop 31 pivotally mounted at 32 on the bar may be moved to positions closing or opening the loops when desired.

Spacing means may be provided on the lower surface of seat 10 in order to space the said seat above the surface upon which the chair rests. In this example, blocks 34 and 35 are secured to the lower surface of the seat at opposite side edges thereof and extend substantially between the front and rear edges. When the spacing blocks are used, they rest on the surface upon which the chair is positioned, such as a bleacher or bench 37, as illustrated in Figure 4. The blocks thus form a space or chamber 38 in which bar 24 operates.

A support is provided for maintaining back 11 at substantially right angles to the seat 10 when the chair is to be used. This support may be in the form of a U-shaped rod 40 with its free ends 41 bent outwardly to fit into lugs 42 of a bracket 43 secured to the back near the top thereof. see Figures 3 and 4. The bottom 45 of the U of the support removably fits in loop 30 of bar 24. Stop 31 may be moved to the position shown in Figure 4 to retain the bottom of the support in the loop, or it may be swung away from this position to allow said bottom to be removed from the loop.

This supporting chair is operated in a very simple manner. When it is in its erected position, that is, when back 11 extends substantially at right angles to seat 10, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 4, the bottom 45 of support 40 is positioned in loop 30 to maintain the back in this position. The bar 24 may be shifted back to the seat to a limited degree. When the seat is placed on the bench or bleacher 37, lug 28 of finger grip 27 engages the front edge of the bench or bleacher to prevent the chair from moving rearwardly thereof. A person sitting on seat 10 may lean back against back 11 for resting purposes. The rod support 40 having a certain amount of resiliency acts more or less as cushioning means for holding the back in position. As the support extends upwardly almost in the same direction as the back, it has a tendency to bend slightly when the person leans against the back. As stated above, bar 24 may be shifted longitudinally of the seat in order to adjust the back relative thereto to a limited extent.

If the chair is placed on the ground or some other relatively large surface, the back 11 may be adjusted towards the horizontal position by turning stop 31 and removing the bottom 45 of support 40 from loop 36. The back may then be swung rearwardly with the support resting on the ground at any desired point, as shown in broken lines in Figure 4. The bottom of the support has atendency to dig into the ground in order to support the back in the adjusted position. Furthermore, the end of the support may be placed against some object, such as a tree, in order to keep it at a desired setting.

When it is desired to collapse or fold the chair. the bottom of the support is disengaged from loop 30, and back 11 is swung downwardly around its hinges 14 into a position flat against the bottom of seat or, when blocks 34 and 35 are used, against said blocks. These blocks actually form part of the seat structure. Figure 8 shows the back in broken lines being swung towards the seat, and in full lines it is shown in its final position against the seat. At this time, support 40 and bar 24 are within the chamber 38 formed between the seat and back. The finger grip 27 of the bar extends through the hand hole 19 of the back, and lug 28 overlaps the outer surface of the back to hold it in position. The chair is now in a small compact and flat bundle which may be easily stored or carried around. If desired, the bundle may be carried in somewhat the same manner as a suitcase by inserting the fingers in the hole 19, in which case the portion 48 of the back between said hole and the outer or upper edge of the able relative to the back constitutes a handle. The recess at the inner edge I of the back permits the latter to swing around the end of bar 24 having the loop 30 thereon.

In order to open up the chair, it is only necessary to move bar 24 to release lug 28 from the chair back. After this is done, the back is swung around into a substantially vertical position, the bottom 45 of support 40 is placed in loop 30, and the stop 31 is turned to retain said bottom in the loop. The chair is now ready for use.

What we claim as our invention is:

1. A collapsible supporting chair to be placed on the ground, bleacher or the like, comprising a seat, a back hingedly connected to the rear edge of the seat, said back being movable to a position flat against the seat when the chair is not required and to a position substantially at right angles to said seat for use, bar means slidably mounted along the bottom of the seat and projecting beyond the rear edge thereof, and a support connected at its opposite ends to the adjacent end of the bar means and to the back near the top thereof, said bar means being movseat to adjust the angle of the back to the latter.'

2. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 1 in which the support is hingedly connected to both the supporting means and the back.

3. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 1 in which one end of the support is removably connected to the bar means, whereby the support may be disconnected from the bar-means and swung away from the seat to support the back at a greater angle to said seat than normal.

4. A collapsible supporting chair to be placed on the ground, bleacher or the like, comprising a seat, a back extending substantially at right angles to the seat when the chair is in operation, ofiset hinge means connecting the rear edge of the seat to the lower edge of the back, said hinge means permitting the back to be folded against the seat, a bar slidably mounted along the bottom of the seat and projecting beyond the rear edge thereof, and a support hingedly connected at its opposite ends to the adjacent end of the bar and to the back near the top thereof, said bar being movable relative to the seat to adjust the angle of the back to the latter.

5. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 4 including spacing means on the bottom of the seat forming a chamber between the seat and back when the latter is folded against the former, said support lying in the chamber at this time.

6. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 4 in which the bar is provided with gripping means at its forward end for engaging the back when said back is folded against the seat to hold them together.

7. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 4 in which the support is in the form of a U-shaped rod with the free ends thereof connected to the back and the bottom of the U connected to the bar.

8. A collapsible supporting chair as claimed in claim 7 in which the bar has an open loop at its rear end into which the bottom of the U fits, and including means on the bar for removably locking the U bottom in the loop. References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 126,599 Waterhouse May 7, 1872 614,766 Safiord Nov. 22, 1898 648,715 Walton May 1, 1900 1,852,012 Hose Apr. 5, 1932 2,108,531 Flanders Feb. 15, 1938

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US126599 *May 7, 1872 Improvement in bed-seats for invalids
US614766 *Jun 11, 1898Nov 22, 1898 Invalid-rest
US648715 *Oct 6, 1899May 1, 1900Jerrold F WaltonChair.
US1852012 *Apr 2, 1929Apr 5, 1932Gower Hose HenryAdjustable seat
US2108531 *Dec 23, 1935Feb 15, 1938Flanders William EPortable seat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4181356 *Jan 13, 1977Jan 1, 1980Henry FleischerFolding baby carriers
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/377
International ClassificationA47C1/00, A47C1/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/16
European ClassificationA47C1/16