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Publication numberUS2760757 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1956
Filing dateJun 25, 1953
Priority dateJun 25, 1953
Publication numberUS 2760757 A, US 2760757A, US-A-2760757, US2760757 A, US2760757A
InventorsCharles H Donaldson, Leon A Dragos
Original AssigneeCharles H Donaldson, Leon A Dragos
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coring machine
US 2760757 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug 28, 1956 c. H. DONALDSON Er/u. 2,760,757

CORING MACHINE N )E L L@ L@ C21/4f f/Z Q Aug- 28, 1956 c. H DONALDSON E'r/u. 2,760,757

CORING MACHINE FiledJune 25, 195s 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 nited States Patent O 2,760,757 coRlNG MACHINE Charles H. Donaldson and Leon A. Dragos, Melvindale, Mich.

Application June 25, 1953, Serial N0.364,113

Claims. (Cl. Z55-36) The present invention relates to a surface coring machine `and more particularly to a machine which is adapted to core out holes in a driving surface, such as' a road, so that suitable plastic road markers may be inserted and affixed in place in such holes.

There has long been sought a simple and etlicient manner for marking road surfaces. It has been found that painting the marker lines on a road surface leaves much to be desired. Such markings must be repaintedat least twice yearly at substantial expense. In addition, such painted markings soon become dillicult to see as they are worn, and this produces a safety hazard.

A novel method of marking such surfaces is to core out a series of holes in the same, apply a suitable adhesive, and insert plastic discs, preferably formed of fiberglass, into the cored out holes so that the discs are flush with the adjacent road surface.

The machine of the present invention is used in the above method to core out the holes in the surface in the desired manner.

It is a principal object of the present invention to provide a coring machine which will quickly and eiciently core out a hole in a driving surface.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a coring machine, particularly adaptedl for driving surfaces, which will core out a series of holes in a desired pattern in a minimum amount of time, and which is readily adapted for use with `different types of driving surfaces.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide' a coring machine which is simple in construction and operation, and wherein the coring member is accurately guided to core out a hole of the correct positioning and depth.

yOther objects of this invention will appear in the following description and appended claims, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts in the several views.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a coring machine embodying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the platform of the coring machine shown in Fig. 1 with the superstructure removed.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the actuating mechanism of the coring machine.

Fig. 4 is an elevation 4of one of the cutters adapted for use with the coring machine of the present invention.

Fig. 5 is a bottom view of the cutter shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view ofanother type of cutter used with the coring machine of the present invention.

Fig. 7 is a bottom view of a coring grinder used with the coring machine of the present invention.

Before explaining the present invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings, .Since the invention is capable -of other embodiments and Patented Aug. 2s, 195e rice of being practiced or carried out in various Ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology or terminology employed herein is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring to the drawings, the numeral 10 indicates a flat platform having a pair of handle members 12 afxed to one end thereof by any suitable means such as bolts. A pair of wheels 14 are provided at the forward portion of the platform 10 to render the same readily movable.

A vertical post 16 is mounted near the forward end of the platform 10. A clamping collar 18 is slidably disposed on the post 16. .Asupport 20 is also slidably positioned on the post 16 yabove the collar 18. The support 20 may be adjusted up -or down on the post 16 and may be retained in position by the clamping collar 18. A power unit 22 is located forward of the post 16 and includes a power source such as an electric motor. In the preferred construction, a reduction gear train of conventional construction is also provided in the unit 22. An electric lead 24 is provided, which may be aflxed to any suitable source of electrical power. It is to be understood, however, that a power source other than an electric motor may be utilized. For example the electric motor can be replaced with a gasoline engine.

The power is transmitted from the reduction gearing to a pulley 26 in the head 28 of the coring mechanism by suitable means such as the belt 3G. A chain or direct gear drive can also be used if desired. The actuating mechanism is shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings and comprises a shaft 32 which is in splined engagement with the pulley 26 and rotates therewith. The shaft 32 is in engagement with the inner races of the seating bearings 34 and 36 which seat the spindle 38. Thus, the shaft is in sliding engagement and rotates with the pulley. An upper collar 40 and a lower collar 42 are affixed to the shaft 32 and rotate therewith.

A toothed rack portion 44 isv provided on the spindle 38 and engages the teeth of an actuating gear 46. The actuating gear 46 is rotatably mounted on the frame of the coring mechanism and has a handle 48 operably coupled therewith. When it is desired to move the shaft up or down the handle 48 is rotated and this in turn ro- Y tates the actuating gear 46. The gear 46 moves the spindle 38 vertically through the toothed rack portion. The spindle 38 moves against one of the collars 40 or 42 and moves the rotating shaft 32 up or down depending upon the direction of rotation of the handle 48. The rotating shaft 32 is moved vertically with the non-rotating spindle.

A chuck 50 is positioned on the lower end of the shaft 32 and may be of any of the conventional types. The chuck 50 is adapted to receive the shank of a cutter designated generally by'lthe numeral 52 in Fig. l vof the drawings. With the structure described thus far, it will be seen that the coring mechanism may be adjusted vertically on the post 16, and the rotating shaft 32 may be actuated vertically by the handle 48.

A mechanism is provided for assuring that ,the holes will be cored a consistent depth. This mechanism consists of a vertical pin 54 which has a threaded portion 56 thereon. The pin 54 is-atlixed to the spindle 38 through the bracket 58 and is slidably disposed through a guide 60 formed on the frame of the coring mechanism. A threaded n'ng 62 is disposed on the threaded portion 56 of the pin 54 and may be adjusted to the proper position for the desired Idepth of the cored out hole. Then as the handle 48 is rotated to move the spindle 38 downward, the ring 62 will engage the guide 60 when the desired depth is attained. This construction is particularly adapted for a shoulderless cutter such as shown in Figs. 1 and 6 of the drawings.

Another structure which may be used to assure constant depth in the cored holes is shown at 63 in Fig. 3. This is an adjustable collar which is in splined engagement with the shaft 32. The collar may be slid up and down on the shaft to the desired position and held in place by means such as a set screw. In this manner, the depth of the hole will be determined when the adjustable collar 63 engages the pulley hub in its downward travel.

A roller-type bearing 64 is provided in the platform 10 so that the opening in the beating will align with the body of the cutter 52. The expression roller-type includes both roller and ball bearings. Thus, the cutter may be maintained in proper alignment during the coring operation, and accidental movements of the coring mechanism will not cause damage because the sides of the cutter will merely rotate the inner race of the roller bearing 64. In operation, a portion of the cutter 52 remains within the connes of the bearing 64 while the cutting operation is accomplished. Thus, accurate alignment is maintained.

In order to maintain the platform of the coring machine in substantially parallel relation to the adjacent road surface, three pointed bolts 66, 68 and 7@ are positioned in threaded engagement with the platform structure. This provides a three point suspension, and the bolts may be quickly and easily adjusted to provide a good seat for the coring machine.

It is usually desirable to space the discs consistent predetermined distances apart. ln order to facilitate this procedure, an indicating scale 72 is provided. This scale includes the slotted indicator arm 74 having a scale thereon which matches an adjacent scale on the platform lll. A wing nut 76 is positioned over the slot in the arm 74 and permits alixing the arm in the desired position on the scale. A downwardly extending pointer 78 is provided on one end of the arm 74. When the position of the first hole is marked and the machine is moved into place, the indicator arm 74 can be set so that the pointer 78 will indicate the position of the next hole. This position is quickly marked with any suitable means and the machine is worked progressively through a series of such holes.

Various coring tools are shown in Figs. 4-7 of the drawings. One type is shown in Figs. 4 and 5. This cutter comprises the disc-shaped body portion 8i) which has a top shoulder 82 and a shank 84 extending upwardly therefrom. The shank 84 is adapted for fastening within the chuck of the coring mechanism as previously explained. The shoulder 82 provides a positive stop for accurately controlling the depth of the hole which is to be cored out. The bottom of the shoulder 82 will rest upon the top of the inner race of the bearing 64 when the cutter is moved to a suilicient dep-th. In this manner a hole of the proper depth can be cored out and the inner race of the bearing construction will rotate as it is engaged by the cutter or the cutter shoulder.

Fig. discloses the configuration of the cutting blades. Two of the blades 86 and 88 are provided with slots 90 therein. which create effective cutting. The third blade 92 does not have the notches and is used to clean and smooth out the hole. This combination o-f cutting blades has been found to be unusually elfective.

Fig. 6 discloses the manner in which `the blades are positioned in a cutter. The particular cutter shown is the type disclosed in Fig. l of the drawings, which does not include the shoulder portion. The carboloy cutting blade 94 is provided with a fiat face 96 and a tapered face 98. The flat face is seated against one Wall of the slot in the cutter 100. A holding member 102 is placed adjacent the blade 96 and has a tapered face 104 which matches the tapered face 98 of the blade 96 and a tapered face 106 which matches the adjacent tapered wall in the slot in the cutter 100. In this manner the blade 96 is wedged into position securely without danger of coming loose from the cutter 100.

This in effect forms teeth in these two blades.

Fig. 7 discloses another type of coring member which is used when coring concrete rather than asphalt. This coring member consists of a disc-shaped body 1% which has at least its entire outer surface formed of a grinding compound. The grinding material will core out a smooth hole in the concrete. A shoulder is indicated at liti, although the shoulder would not be provided if the disc were used with a mechanism which utilized a different stopping means.

The coring machine of the present invention has proven a definite success. It will eiiiciently core out a hole in asphalt in approximately twenty seconds. It takes approximately forty seconds to core out a hole in concrete. Cedar block surfaces, such as the aisleways in industrial plants, are cored out in approximately the same time as asphalt.

Having thus `described our invention, we claim.

1. A high production manually portable coring machine for rapidly cutting a pattern of holes into a traveled surface to receive indicating inserts, comprising a movable platform, means to maintain said platform above and apart from the traveled surface actuating means disposed on said platform, a cutting member operatively coupled with said actuating means and including a discshaped body having an annular flange around the top thereof, a roller-type bearing affixed in said platform and adapted to guide said cutting member body as the cutting member is moved into engagement with the traveled surface, said annular flange resting on top of said bearing to limit the downward travel of said cutter into said traveled surface to a predetermined distance in every cutting operation to obtain holes of uniform depth.

2. A high production manually portable coring ma.- chine for rapidly cutting a pattern of holes into a traveled surface to receive indicating inserts, comprising a manually movable platform, a guide post rigidly athxed to and extending upwardly from said platform, means to maintain said platform above and apart from the traveled surface, a drilling mechanism movably mounted on said guide post, means on the lower end of said drilling mechanism for attaching a cutting member, a rotatable bearing member disposed in said platform and extending therethrough to guide and support the cutting member, and means to limit the downward travel of the cutting member into said surface to a predetermined distance in every cutting operation to obtain holes of uniform depth.

3. A high production manually portable coring. machine for rapidly cutting a pattern of holes into a traveled surface to receive indicating inserts, comprising a manually movable platform, means to maintain said platform above and apart from the traveled surface, a guide post rigidly alixed to and extending upwardly from said platform, .a ldrilling mechanism movably mounted on said guide post, means on the lower end of said drilling mechanism for attaching a cutting member, a rotatable bearing member disposed in said platform and extending therethrough to guide and support the cutting member, means to limit the downward travel of the cutting member into said surface to a predetermined `distance in every cutting operation to obtain holes of uniform depth, and indicating means rigidly ailixed to said platform for positively marking the position of the next hole to be cored in the pattern.

4. A high production manually portable coring machine for rapidly cutting a pattern of holes into a traveled surface to receive indicating inserts, comprising a manually movable platform, a guide post rigidly affixedv to and extending upwardly from said platform, a drilling mechanism movably mounted on said guide post, means on the lower end of said drilling mechanism for attaching a cutting member, a rotatable bearing member disposed in said platform and extending therethrough to guide and support the cutting member, means to limit the downward travel of the cutting member into said surface to a predetermined distance in every cutting operation to obtain holes of uniform depth, and means on said platform to adjust the position of said platform above and apart from the adjacent traveled surface.

5. A high production manually portable coring machine for rapidly cutting a pattern of holes into a traveled surface to receive indicating inserts, comprising a relatively heavy manually movable platform, means to maintain said platform above and apart from the traveled surface, a guide post rigidly aXed to and extending upward- 1y from siad platform, a drilling mechanism movably mounted on said guide post, a rotatable rounded cutting member operatively coupled on the lower end of said drilling mechanism, a roller-type bearing affixed in said platform and extending therethrough to guide and support said cutting member, a portion of said cutting member remaining within the contines of the bearing during the cutting operation, and means to limit the downward travel of the cutting member into said surface to a predetermined distance in every cutting operation to obtain holes of uniform depth.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 391,501 Andrews Oct. 23, 1888 971,791 Prisk Oct. 4, 1910 1,496,948 Schutt June 10, 1924 1,951,192 Hantjopoulos Mar. 13, 1934 1,973,176 Richardson Sept. 11, 1934 2,084,686 Howard June 22, 1937 2,511,831 Adamson June 20, 1950 2,674,906 Timpner Apr. 13, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US391501 *Oct 8, 1887Oct 23, 1888 Well-boring apparatus
US971791 *Feb 9, 1909Oct 4, 1910John PriskEarth-hole-forming machine for weed-exterminating purposes.
US1496948 *Nov 3, 1920Jun 10, 1924Schutt Guy AMetal-working machine
US1951192 *Apr 26, 1933Mar 13, 1934George HantjopoulosAutomatic soil drill
US1973176 *Aug 29, 1930Sep 11, 1934Cleveland Rock Drill CoRoad drilling tool for setting marking plugs and the like
US2084686 *Jun 21, 1935Jun 22, 1937Howard Frank LSample taking machine
US2511831 *Apr 8, 1946Jun 20, 1950 Drill bit
US2674906 *Aug 31, 1950Apr 13, 1954Robert F KrainzHole spacing attachment for drill presses
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5158393 *Jan 22, 1991Oct 27, 1992Joseph BosslerIndustrial and roadway identification and floor surface treatment system, and diamond surface drill bit for use in installing the system
US5252009 *Sep 3, 1992Oct 12, 1993Joseph BosslerIndustrial and roadway identification and floor surface treatment system, and diamond surface drill bit for use in installing the system
US5895170 *Apr 17, 1997Apr 20, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyFlexible raised pavement marker, mounting device and method
EP0096747A1 *May 7, 1983Dec 28, 1983Firma Franz BucarMethod and apparatus for constructing, reconditioning or maintaining asphalt, concrete or like road coverings in the vicinity of manholes and the like embedded therein
EP0568498A1 *Apr 22, 1993Nov 3, 1993Hydrostress AgApparatus for making holes in concrete slabs
WO1997013038A1 *Aug 26, 1996Apr 10, 1997Minnesota Mining & MfgFlexible raised pavement marker, mounting device and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/21, 104/17.1, 173/188, 173/37, 125/20, 173/45, 404/9, 173/148, 404/6, 175/426, 408/77
International ClassificationE01C23/09, E21B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationE01C23/0946, E01C23/094, E21B7/021
European ClassificationE01C23/09B3B3, E21B7/02B, E01C23/09B3B2