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Publication numberUS2761583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1956
Filing dateMar 5, 1954
Priority dateMar 5, 1954
Publication numberUS 2761583 A, US 2761583A, US-A-2761583, US2761583 A, US2761583A
InventorsMorse Kenneth C
Original AssigneeMorse Kenneth C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container opener
US 2761583 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 4, 1956 K. c. MORSE 2,761,583

CONTAINER OPENER Filed March 5, 1954 Kennefh 6. Morse INVENTOR.

United States Patent Qfifice 2,761,583 Patented Sept. 4, 1956 CONTAINER OPENER Kenneth C. Morse, Miami Springs, Fla.

Application March 5, 1954, Serial No. 414,336

4 Claims. (Cl. 220-53) This invention relates in general to improvements in containers, and more specifically to a container having a novel container opener.

At the present time, metal cans are widely used for holding various liquids including beverages, oil and milk. However, there are many times when one is desirous of opening a can and finds that he does not have in his possession a can opener. It is then necessary for him to hunt for a can opener before he can dispense the contents of the can.

It is therefore the primary object of this invention to provide an improved can construction which includes a built-in can opener.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved can which includes pouring spouts, the pouring spouts being suitably sealed with a sealing means and the latter being provided with means for removing the same.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved container construction which is formed with a wall having spaced openings therein, the spaced openings being closed by closures and the closures being connected by a pull wire, whereby the closures may be simultaneously removed with a single pull on the pull wire.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary top perspective view of a can which may be considered a milk can and shows the same provided with the closures and can opener which are the subject of this invention, the finger receiving loop of a pull wire of the can opener being shown in an upright position ready for receiving ones finger, the normal shipping position of the loop being shown in dotted lines;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary top perspective view similar to Figure l and shows the closures and can opener removed from the can and disposed immediately above the top of the can;

Figure 3 is a fragmentary top perspective view of a modified form of can construction and shows a modified form of closure;

Figure 4 is a fragmentary top perspective view similar to Figure 3 and shows the closures and pull wire of the container of Figure 3 in a removed position relative to the top of the can;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary top perspective view of a still further modified form of can construction and shows the can opener in position for movement to a can opening position; and

Figure 6 is a fragmentary top perspective View of the container of Figure 5 and shows the top thereof open with the closures and the can opener being removed.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that there is illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 a container construction which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 10. The container construction 10 includes a top wall 12 which is formed of a suitable metal, such as the tin plated steel sheets normally utilized in can construction. The top wall 12 is provided with a pair of spaced pouring openings 14 which are of relatively small size.

In order that the pouring openings 14 may be conveniently sealed and opened, there is provided a combination can opener and sealing device which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 16. The combination closure and can opening device 16 is in the form of an elongated pull wire 18 which is provided with flattened end portions 20. The end portions 20 are of a size to completely cover the pouring openings 14 and are sealed to the top wall 12 surrounding the pouring openings 14 by suitable sealing means which may include a solder-like material.

In order that the combination pull wire and closure means may be conveniently removed relative to the top wall 12, the pull wire 18 is provided with a finger receiving loop 22 which is disposed at its midpoint. The finger receiving loop 22 is formed by twisting the pull wire 18, as at 24.

The container 10 is intended to contain a liquid which is to be dispensed therefrom in small quantities. Therefore, the pouring openings 14 are relatively small.

While the finger receiving loop 22 is in an upstanding position when initially receiving a finger, it is normally disposed in a fiat position overlying the top wall 12, as is best illustrated in dotted lines in Figure l to facilitate packing and shipping. It is first moved to a vertical position and then ones finger is placed therethrough so that the pull wire 18 may be tensioned to pull the end portions 20 out of sealing engagement with the top wall 12.

Referring now to Figures 3 and 4 in particular, it will be seen that there is illustrated a modified form of container which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 26. The container 26, like the container 10, includesa top wall 28 which is preferably formed of a tin coated sheet of metal. As is best illustrated in Figure 4, the top wall 28 is provided with a pair of diametrically oppositely disposed pouring openings 30 which are of a relatively large size. The pouring openings 30 are intended to permit the pouring of a relatively heavy liquid, such as motor oil and the like.

In order that the container 26 may be conveniently opened, there is provided a combination can opener and closure construction which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 32. The combination can opener and closure construction 32 includes an elongated pull wire 34 which terminates at its ends in enlarged flattened end portions 36. The flattened end portions 35 are of a size to completely cover the pouring openings 3% and to be sealed to the top wall 28 surrounding the pouring openings 30 by a suitable sealing material, such as solder.

In order that the combination can opener and closure construction may be conveniently removed from the top wall 28, the pull wire 34 is provided intermediate its ends with a finger receiving loop 38. The loop 38 is formed by knotting the pull wire 34, as at 4%. If desired, the twists and knots can be secured by solder.

As is best illustrated in Figure 3, the finger receiving loop 38 is normally disposed in a horizontal position directly overlying the top wall 28. When it is desired to remove the end portions 36 from overlying relation with respect to the pouring openings 30, the finger receiving loop 38 is bent up to a vertical position and ones finger is placed thcrethrough and tension is applied to the pull wire 34 to pull the end portions 36 thereof out of sealing engagement with the top wall 28.

Referring now to Figures 5 and 6 in particular, it will be seen that there is illustrated a still further modified form of container which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 42. The container 42 includes a metallic top wall 44. The top wall 44 is provided with a relatively large pouring opening 46 which is aligned with a diametrically opposite elongated slit 48. The container 42 is intended to contain a liquid such as beer or other beverage, and the slit 48 is intended to function as a breathing opening.

In order that the container 42 may be conveniently sealed and at the same time conveniently opened, there is provided the combination can opener and closure construction which is referred to in general by the reference numeral 50. The combination can opener and closure construction 50 includes an elongated length of pull Wire 52 which is provided at one end with a flattened end portion 54 which functions as a closure for the opening 46. The flattened portion 54 is suitably sealed to the top wall 44 surrounding the pouring opening 46 by a solder-like material.

The opposite end of the pull wire 52 is in the form of a finger receiving loop 56 to facilitate the pulling of the pull wire 52. An intermediate portion of the pull wire 52 is pressed into the slit 48 and is suitably sealed with respect thereto, as at 58.

When it is desired to open the container 42, ones finger is inserted in the finger receiving loop 56 and a pull is applied. The intermediate portion of the pull wire 52 is first pulled out of the slit 48 and then the flattened end portion 54 is pulled from overlying relation to the pouring opening 46. The liquid contained in the container 42 may then be easily poured out of the pouring opening 46 at the same time air may enter through the slit 48 so that the container 42 may be properly vented.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that there has been illustrated and described a container construction in which the top walls thereof are provided with suitable pouring openings which are normally closed by a closure element, and that the closure elements are connected to can openers so that the containers may be quickly and easily opened, as desired, without the use of any tool whatsoever.

From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood and further explanation is believed to be unnecessary. However, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A container construction comprising a container embodying a top wall having at least one pre-formed pouring opening therein, said opening being positioned within the outer marginal limits of said wall, a readily applicable and removable closure of an area greater than and overlying and completely covering said opening and having its marginal edge portions detachably sealed to the exterior surfaces of said wall and requiring the application of intentionally applied force in order to effect its detachment and consequent uncovering of said opening, a wire superimposed against said top wall and of a length less than the diameter of the wall and connected at one end with said closure, and a finger pull in the form of a loop, said loop permanently attached to said wire, whereby upon placing a finger in the loop and yanking the wire while holding the container said closure may be ripped off to allow the contents of the container to be emptied by way of the opening.

2. In combination, a commodity containing tin embodying a flat top wall having diametrically opposite pouring holes therein located inwardly of the marginal edge of the top wall, a length of wire superimposed against the exterior surface of said top wall and having flattened ends constituting closures, said closures being each of an area greater than the opening and the respective closures covering the openings and being detachably sealed to the top wall, the intermediate portion of said wire being twisted and formed into a finger loop, said loop constituting a pull and serving to permit one to hold the tin in one hand and to catch hold of the loop with a finger of the other hand and to yank the wire ofi? thus separating the respective closures and uncovering the openings.

3. The structure defined in claim 2 and wherein said finger loop is normally bent flatwise against the exterior surface of said top wall and is capable of being bent up and at right angles to the top wall where it may be conveniently grasped for handy usefulness.

4. In combination, a commodity can having a flat top wall provided within its perimeter limits with a pouring opening and at a diametrically opposite point with a relatively restricted slit, a length of wire flattened at one end and providing a closure, said closure overlying said opening and having its marginal edges detachably sealed by solder-like material to the wall of the can, an intermediate portion of said wire being lodged in said slit and removably soldered in place, the adjacent end of the wire being formed into a loop-shaped finger pull which may be grasped and utilized to rip the wire OE and to remove the closure.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,664,515 Lambert Apr. 3, 1928 2,034,007 Smith Mar. 17, 1936 2,344,325 Punte Mar. 14, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1664515 *Nov 6, 1926Apr 3, 1928Orin GilstrapOpening device for cans
US2034007 *Sep 15, 1933Mar 17, 1936Elizabeth SmithClosure for receptacles
US2344325 *Sep 15, 1941Mar 14, 1944Continental Can CoWire opening container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3080088 *Jun 30, 1960Mar 5, 1963American Can CoTamperproof container
US4770325 *Jul 29, 1986Sep 13, 1988International Paper CompanyPour spout for containers
US7513383 *Nov 27, 2002Apr 7, 2009Bo-Yeoun HwangOpening device for can
US7975884Jul 12, 2006Jul 12, 2011Alcoa Inc.Vent tube for liquid container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/271
International ClassificationB65D17/00, B65D17/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2517/0013, B65D2517/5029, B65D2517/5091, B65D17/502, B65D2517/5081, B65D2517/0094
European ClassificationB65D17/50A1