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Publication numberUS2761647 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 4, 1956
Filing dateMay 2, 1951
Priority dateMay 2, 1951
Publication numberUS 2761647 A, US 2761647A, US-A-2761647, US2761647 A, US2761647A
InventorsZeck Ivan V
Original AssigneeZeck Ivan V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve for internal combustion engine carburetor
US 2761647 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 4, 1956 l. v. ZECK 2,761,647

VALVE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE CARBURETOR Filed May 2, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR [ln L Keck ATTORNEY 4 W M4 W W 8 g m 6 W fi M. u y 4 w m 0 s m w 4 v v w w M M? V] H wwwfiwm/ 2 l 1 w, in: m 32 1 mw Sept. 4, 1956 l. V. ZECK VALVE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE CARBURETOR Filed May 2, 19 51 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 4 Z W m WV m \llnlrlun WZJ a l a 2 7 0 0 ,2 JAUW M Hum l- 4 1 8 m ,mo "2 m United States Patent VALVE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE CARBURETOR This invention relates to internal combustion engine carburetors, and more particularly to a gas load valve assembly therefor.

One of the primary objects of this invention is to provide means for quickly and accurately adjusting the gas load valve to its proper position when the operator of an internal combustion engine changes from one type of fuel to another.

A further object of this invention is to provide means for indicating the precise setting for a gas load valve when changing from one type of gas to another.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a gas load valve which is non-complex in construction and which is inexpensive to manufacture and maintain.

Other and further objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following specification when read in conjunction with the appended drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal section, partly in elevation, of a conventional internal combustion engine carburetor disclosing a gas load valve and its assembly constructed in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 2 is an exploded perspective view, partly in section, of the gas load valve and its assembly as shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the gas load assembly taken on the lines 3--3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal section of a modification of this invention; and

Fig. 5 is an enlarged exploded perspective view, partly in section, of the gas load valve and its assembly as shown in Fig. 4.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral 2 indicates, in general, a conventional carburetor for an internal combustion engine. The carburetor comprises a substantially hollow casing 4 having a laterally projecting hollow boss 6 disposed adjacent its lower end. As is seen in the drawings, the hollow boss 6 is internally threaded at 8 to provide means for connecting the carburetor 2 with a source of fuel. The fuel may be natural gas, butane, propane or a combination of gases,

or other types of gaseous fuel.

The carburetor 2 as illustrated is of a conventional form adapted for the burning of gaseous fuel as used heretofore, having an air inlet at one side of the mixing chamber 12, at the right in Fig. 1, as indicated generally at 20. The air is adapted to be admitted through the air inlet into the mixing chamber for mixture with the gaseous fuel admitted to the latter and to be supplied therefrom to the internal combustion engine in the conventional manner.

The boss 6 is in open communication with a gas collecting chamber 10 which is connected with the mixing chamber 12 through the open ended gas inlet conduit 14. A venturi 16 is rigidly secured to the inner wall of the mixing chamber 12 and is positioned to surround a portion of the upper end 18 of the tube 14.

The conduit 14 is fixedly secured within the'internal boss 22 formed integrally with the casing 4 and its lower ice end projects into the gas collecting chamber 10 to serve as a valve seat 24 for the gas load valve designated in general by the reference numeral 25. A hollow internally threaded boss 26 is integrally formed in the lower end of the casing 4 below boss 22 and conduit 14, and is in coaxial alignment therewith.

As is clearly seen in Figs. 1 and 2, the gas load valve 25 comprises an enlarged cylindrical head 28 which tapers to an end 30 toward the valve seat 24 when disposed in operative position within the carburetor 2. The other side of the valve head 28 is reduced in diameter to form a shank 32 which is, in turn, reduced in diameter to form a stem 34 externally threaded over substantially its entire length.

As is seen in Fig. 1, the valve stem 34 is threaded through an internally threaded aperture 36 formed at the base 38 of a guide way 42 bored in one end of a bushing 40 to slidably and rotatably receive the shank 32 of the gas load valve 25 therein.

The other end of the bushing 40 is provided with a circumferential flange 44. A plurality of spaced, radially extending passages 46 are bored inwardly from the periphery of the flange 44, the passages 46 communicating at their inner ends with the threaded aperture 36. As is clearly shown in Fig. 2, the passages 46 are threaded at 48 along a portion of their length adjacent the peripheral edge of the flange 44.

A keeper rod 49 of shorter length than the length of the passage 46 is inserted therein and is provided with threads 50 at one end thereof for frictionally engaging the threaded valve stem 34. The keeper rod 49 is constantly urged into engagement with the valve stem 34 by means of a helical spring 52 disposed in the passage 46 and held under compression between the other end of the keeper rod 49 and the adjacent end of an externally threaded screw 54 which is threaded into the threaded portion 48 of the passage 46. The keeper rod 49, the spring 52, and the screw 54 cooperate to prevent inadvertent movement of the gas load valve 25 along the longitudinal axis of the bushing 40.

The bushing 40 is externally threaded at 56 for engagement with the internal threads of the boss 26, as shown in Fig. 1.

A ring 58 surrounds the bushing 42 adjacent the flange 44 and has an integrally formed arm 60 depending therefrom substantially perpendicular to the plane of the ring. Under operating conditions, the ring 58 is clamped in fixed position between the lower end of the boss 26 and the flange 44 to prevent rotation of the arm 60 about the longitudinal axis of the bushing 42. However, it should be noted that the arm 60 may be disposed at any given angular position about the axis of the valve 25. This facilitates the adaptation of the present invention to a variety of existing engines.

A ring 62 having a threaded aperture 64 is threaded on the valve stem 34 adjacent the flange 44. The ring 62 is formed with a lug 66 projecting from its periphery for engagement with one side of the arm 60 as the ring 62 is rotated about the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 25. An elongated substantially rectangular lock nut 68 having a central threaded aperture 70 is threaded on the valve stem 34 and engages against the ring 62 to prevent rotation of the ring 62 about the axis of the valve stem 34.

From Figs. 1 and 2, it is seen that the lock nut 68 has a depending circular shoulder 72 which is received within the central aperture 73 of a ring 74. The ring 74 is provided with a lug 76 projecting from its periphery for engagement with the other side of the arm 60 as the ring 74 is rotated about the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 25.

A thrust washer 78 having an aperture 80 is mounted on the valve stem 34 and is forced upwardly against the ring 74 by a nut 82 thereby clamping the ring 74 between the adjacent faces of the lock nut 68 and the thrust washer 78 to prevent rotation of the ring 74 about the longitudinal axis of the valve 25.

The nut 82 has a plurality of slots 84 (see Fig. 3) formed in its exterior face, any one of which may be aligned with an opening 86 formed in the valve stem 34 perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 25. A pin 88 is inserted in the aligned slot 84 and opening 86 to prevent rotation of the nut 82 relative to the valve stem 34.

Having described this embodiment of the invention in detail, the operation thereof is as follows:

Let it be assumed that the gas load valve 25 has been adjusted to the position shown in Fig. 1 to permit the internal combustion engine to operate at its maximum efliciency and economy, on a fuel having a given B. t. u. rating, and that the rings 62 and 74 are free to rotate about the valve stem 34. The ring 62 is then turned until the lug 66 engages one side of the depending arm 60. The lock nut 68 is then threaded upwardly on the valve stem 34 to engage against the ring 62 to prevent its rotation relative to the valve stem 34. This establishes the setting for the gas load valve 25 for the given gaseous fuel.

Now let it be assumed that it is desired to adjust the gas load valve 25 for a gaseous fuel having a lower B. t. u. rating. In this case, the gas load valve 25 is turned counter-clockwise by the ring 62 until the proper adjustment is located, whereupon the ring 74 is rotated until the lug 76 engages the arm 60. The nut 82 is then tightened against the thrust washer 78 until the ring 74 is tightly clamped between the lock nut 68 and the thrust washer 78. This establishes the setting of the gas load valve 25 for the gaseous fuel having a lower B. t. u. rating than the first.

It should now be evident that when it is desired to change from one gaseous fuel to another, the operator may quickly make the necessary adjustment of the gas load valve 25 by rotating the rings 62 and 74 in one direction or the other until one or the other of the lugs 66 or 76 engages the arm 60 depending upon which of the two gaseous fuels is to be used.

Another advantage of this structure which should now be evident is that the relationship between bushing 40 and the abutment carrying ring 58 permits temporary increases in the rate of fuel flow in the carburetor, Without disturbing the setting of either of the adjustable lugs 66 and 76 on the valve stem 34. When a richer mixture is desired, as in starting, the bushing 40 may be unscrewed slightly from the boss 26 in the casing 4. Since the abutment 60 is released at the same instant that the valve stem 34 begins to turn relative to the casing 4, the abutment 60 will simply revolve with the lugs 66 and 76. After the engine has warmed up, the valve assembly is reset by screwing the bushing 40 back into the boss 26 and holding the abutment 60 in contact with one of the lugs until it is again clamped between the flange 44 of the bushing 40 and the exterior of the casing boss 26.

In the modification illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5, elements of the carburetor shown therein and finding their equivalents in the carburetor illustrated in Figs. 1 to 3, inclusive, have been assigned identical reference numerals with the additive of the prime mark.

In this modification, the gas load valve 100 is substantially cylindrical in configuration and is provided at its upper end with a tapered head 102. The gas load valve 100 is threaded at 104 over a portion of its length intermediate its ends, and has a non-threaded section 106 adjacent its lower end. The lower end of the gas load valve is reduced in diameter to form a shoulder 107 and a collar 108.

A disc 110 is apertured at 112 to be received on the collar 108. A peripheral lug 114 projects from the disc 110 and is integrally formed therewith. A boss 116 is integrally formed with the disc 110 and extends upwardly therefrom at right angles thereto. The boss 116 is provided with a threading opening 118 therethrough to receive a set screw 120.

A disc 122 is apertured at 124 and is mounted on the collar 108 immediately below the disc 110. The disc 122 is provided with an integrally formed peripheral lug 126.

As is seen in Fig. 4, a thrust washer 128 is apertured at 130 to slidably receive therethrough the threaded shank 132 of a bolt 134. The bolt 134 is mounted in a threaded opening 136 formed in the lower end of the gas load valve 100, the opening being coaxial with the longitudinal axis ofthe gas load valve 100.

Thus it is seen that when the bolt 134 is tightened, the discs 110 and 120 are securely clamped on the gas load valve between the thrust washer 128 and the shoulder 107 thereby fixing the positions of the lugs 114 and 126 relative to the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 100.

A stud 138 is fixedly secured in the boss 26 and 'projects downwardly therefrom into the path-of the lugs 114 and 126.

Having described the component elements of this modification of the invention, the operation thereof is as follows:

Let it be assumed that the gas load valve 100 has been threaded into the internally threaded boss 26, and that the position shown in Fig. 4 represents an adjusted position of the gas load valve 100 for a given gaseous fuel for an internal combustion engine running at its maximum efliciency.

The operator then rotates the disc until the lug 114 engages one side of the stud 138. The set screw is then turned to engage against the non-threaded section 106 of the gas load valve 100 thereby fixing the radial position of the lug 114 relative to the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 100.

Having ascertained this position of the gas load valve, and assuming it is proposed to use a second gaseous fuel having a lower B. t. u. rating, the gas load valve 100 is rotated counter-clockwise to a second adjusted position and the disc 120 is then rotated until its lug 126 engages the other side of the stud 138. The bolt 134 is now tightened to fix the position of the lug 126 relative to the longitudinal axis of the gas load valve 100, and at the same time locks the discs 110 and 120 on the gas load valve 100 for rotation therewith.

After each adjustment of the gas load valve 100 has been made, the gas load valve is secured in its adjusted position by the lock nut 140 mounted on the threaded portion 104 of the gas load valve 100.

It will be understood that the embodiments herein described and illustrated have been offered by way of example, and that this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the claims.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a fluid conduit, a casing surrounding said conduit and having a threaded opening adjacent an end of said conduit, a bushing threadedly mounted in said opening and including an enlarged portion of greater diameter than said opening located outside of said casing, a valve extending through said bushing into said casing into cooperative relation with said conduit and having a threaded stem threadedly engaging said bushng whereby it may be moved relative to said conduit to regulate the rate of fluid flow therethrough, an abutment including a ring portion surrounding said stern adapted to be clamped between said enlarged portion of said bushing and the exterior of said casing, a first stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact one side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a first rate of fluid flow, and a second stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact the other side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a second rate of fluid flow, whereby the rate of fluid flow may be quickly and accurately changed from said first rate to said second rate.

2. Apparatus for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a fluid passageway having a threaded opening through one of its Walls, a bushing threadedly mounted in said opening and having clamping means thereon exteriorly of said passageway, a valve extending through said bushing into said passageway and having a threaded stem threadedly engaging said bushing whereby it may be moved relative to said passageway to regulate the rate of fluid flow therethrough, an abutment including a portion adapted to be clamped between the clamping means on said bushing and the exterior of said passageway, a first stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact one side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a first rate of fluid flow, and a second stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact the other side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a second rate of fluid flow, whereby the rate of fluid flow may be quickly and accurately changed from said first rate to said second rate by moving said valve stem relative to said bushing and whereby the rate of fluid flow may be regulated also by moving said bushing relative to said passageway.

3. Apparatus for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a fluid passageway having a threaded opening through one of its walls, a bushing threadedly mounted in said opening and including an enlarged portion of greater diameter than said opening located outside of said casing, a valve extending through said bushing into said passageway and having a threaded stem threadedly engaging said bushing whereby it may be moved relative to said passageway to regulate the rate of fluid flow therethrough, an abutment mounted so as to allow it to move with said enlarged portion of said bushing, a first stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact one side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a first rate of fluid flow, and a second stop member on said stem adapted to be positioned so that it will contact the other side of said abutment when the valve is in a position permitting a second rate of fluid flow, whereby the rate of fluid flow may be quickly and accurately changed from said first rate to said second rate by moving said valve stem relative to said bushing and whereby the rate of fluid flow may be regulated also by moving said bushing relative to said passageway.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 499,969 Culver June 20, 1893 973,075 Schlemmer Oct. 18, 1910 1,308,145 Church July 1, 1919 1,464,303 Whitelaw Aug. 7, 1923 1,595,619 Reck Aug. 10, 1926 1,852,780 Hueber Apr. 5, 1932 1,964,663 Gossler June 26, 1934 2,010,201 Ruttiman Aug. 6, 1935 2,151,656 Folke Mar. 21, 1939 I FOREIGN PATENTS 206,316 Germany of 1909

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3399814 *Sep 28, 1966Sep 3, 1968Messrs Berk LtdPowder feeder with rotary, axially movable flow controller
US6145809 *Oct 8, 1999Nov 14, 2000Mannesmann Sachs AgActuator for an electromagnetically adjustable valve
US6783112 *Sep 20, 2002Aug 31, 2004Torrent Trading Ltd.Tap
US7188481 *Oct 30, 2002Mar 13, 2007Honeywell International Inc.Adjustable damper actuator
US7900886Apr 18, 2008Mar 8, 2011Caterpillar Inc.Valve assembly having a washer
US8084982Nov 18, 2008Dec 27, 2011Honeywell International Inc.HVAC actuator with output torque compensation
Classifications
U.S. Classification251/225, 48/180.1, 261/66, 251/285, 138/46
International ClassificationF02M13/08, F02M13/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M13/08
European ClassificationF02M13/08