Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2762880 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1956
Filing dateMay 11, 1953
Priority dateMay 11, 1953
Publication numberUS 2762880 A, US 2762880A, US-A-2762880, US2762880 A, US2762880A
InventorsHathorn Clarence J, Schreiber Edward J
Original AssigneeStackpole Carbon Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric slide switch
US 2762880 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. l1, 1956 Q J, HATHORN ET AL ELECTRIC SLIDE SWITCH Filed May l1, 1.953

Mm w el mi. N www,... 7 5 7 2 m ,new m f V/. z aI mud .fw 7,. .w W 2 me 72 f Vl @ww y EL. N m .l /48 n 2 L f/o L E; Z Il# E 4 @Pq/m7 m 4 E 7 8 dJ :J o if n E 0 @6.7 v f/e .M74

United States Patent G ELECTRIC SLIDE SW1 I CH Clarence J. Hathorn and Edward J. Schreiber, St. Marys, Pa., assgnors to Stackpole Carbon Company, St. Marys, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application May 11, 1953, Serial No. 354,324

Claims. (Cl. 200-77) This invention relates to electric slide switches, and more particularly to those in which a sliding metal strip bridges two contacts.

In switches of this character known heretofore, separate indexing members have been required for holding the bridging members in their different positions. When such a switch is a double pole switch it often happens that the indexing member does not permit both bridging members to make good contact.

lt is among the objects of this invention to provide a slide switch which is simple and inexpensive in construction, which has a bridging member that is self indexing, and in which good contact can always be made between the bridging members and the stationary contacts when it is a double pole switch.

ln accordance with this invention, at least three spaced stationary contacts project from the upper face of a base in a line extending lengthwise of a slot formed in the top of a housing above the base. An actuating member or slide is disposed in the housing for movement lengthwise of the slot, and it is provided with a button which projects through one end of the slot for moving the slide. For bridging two of the contacts, a current-conducting spring strip in the housing has a central portion that extends across the tops of the two contacts in sliding engagement with them. The portions of this strip at opposite ends of its central portion extend upward and inward toward each other and have their upper ends pressing upward against the slide to press the strip down against the contacts. The strip is movable longitudinally by the slide. To make the strip self-indexing, its center projects downward between the two contacts engaged by the strip to prevent it from moving until the slide is moved by its button toward the opposite end of the housing slot. Preferably, the bottom of the slide is provided with a recess which receives the upwardly extending portions of the spring strip. The opposite sides of the central portion of the strip may be provided with laterally projecting ears, and the opposite side walls of the recess provided with notches that loosely receiveV the ears to positively connect the strip to the slide. This type of switch is most useful when it is a double throw, double pole switch, wherein there are two rows of stationary contacts, two self-indexing strips and two recesses in the slide.

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. l is a plan View of the switch;

Fig. 2 is an end View;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section taken on the line III- Ill of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a transfer section taken on the line lV-IV of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section taken on the line V--V of Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawings, a housing is provided which is shown in the general form of an inverted channel; that is, it has a web or top wall 1 and parallel flanges or side walls Z. The top wall has extensions at its ends provided with openings 3, by means of which the switch can be fastened in place to the desired support. Although this housing may be made of any suitable material, it is preferred to make it of metal and to provide the lower ICC edges of its side walls with lugs 4 which extend through notches in the edges of a base member 5 and are bent under it to position it in spaced parallel relation to the top of the housing. The member 5 has been described for convenience as being at the bottom of the switch, but of course it will be understood that the switch may be located in an inverted position or on its side or end. The base member is made of insulating material, and mounted in it are two rows of flat metal terminals, each of which has a convex portion projecting above the base to form a stationary contact 7, and a terminal portion 8 extending through a slot in the base for connection to a wire of an electric circuit. Three contacts are shown in each row, and they are spaced in a straight line extending lengthwise of the switch.

Disposed in the housing between its top and the base member is an actuating member or slide that is movable lengthwise of the switch. This slide, which preferably is made of a molded insulating material, has a generally rectangular body i0 from which an integral button 11 projects upward through one end of a slot 12 in the top wall l of the housing. The opposite ends of this slot limit the longitudinal movement of the slide by acting as stops which the button strikes. In a double pole switch, which is the one illustrated, the bottom of the slide is provided with a pair of upwardly extending parallel recesses 13, each of which receives one row lof contacts on the base. The opposite ends of the recesses are open, and their top walls preferably are concave lengthwise.

The center contact in each row can be connected electrically with either of the end contacts in the same row by means of a movable bridging member, which is formed from a strip of spring metal that is a good conductor of electricity. Each spring strip has a central portion 15 that extends lengthwise of the recess above the underlying contacts, but it is only long enough to engage two contacts at a time, the center contact and either of the end contacts. The portions 16 of the strip at opposie ends of its central portion are bent upward and inward so that they are inclined upward toward each other. The spring strip is compressed between the top of a recess 13 and the underlying contacts, whereby it is pressed fairly tightly against the contacts to assure good electrical connections. The upper ends of the strip are bent downward slightly to prevent them from digging into the concave upper wall `of the recess, and they also may be provided with spherical detents 17 on their upper surfaces to help the strip adjust itself in the recess.

Each end of the central portion of the strip also preferably is provided with a downwardly projecting spherical detent 18 for engaging the top of the adjacent end contact. The detent isolates the arc to a point `on the side of the detent and the adjoining stationary contact 7 which is not the normal point of Contact between them, and thereby keeps their contact surfaces clean. The intermediate zone of the strip always remains in engagement with the stationary center contact, and it engages the top of that contact at all times except during switching.

To make the switch self-indexing so that the spring strips will hold themselves at either end of the switch until moved to the opposite end by the slide, the center of each strip is provided with a downwardly projecting detent 19, preferably formed by bending the strip downward into the sha-ie of a shallow V. The strip is of such length that when the slide button 11 engages either end of slot 12, the detent 1S at that end engages the underlying end contact 7. To hold the slide and bridging strip in that position, indexing detent 19 projects down between the two bridged contacts in engagement with the side of the center contact, as shown in Fig. 3. The strip can not move toward the opposite end of the housing unless enough force is applied to the slide button to cause sufficiently to ride over the center contact. The expansion of the spring strip when the indexing detent passes the center point of the center contact causes the strip and slide to snap toward t-he adjacent end of the housing.

Engagement of the upper ends of the spring strips with the concave tops o-f recesses 13 generally will furnish enough friction to cause the slide to move the strips with it. Nevertheless, it is preferred to have a more positive connection, which can be produced by providing the opposite edges of the central portions of the strips with ears Z1 that project loosely into open bottom notches 22 in the outer side Walls of the recesses, and into notches 23 in their inner side walls. The latter notches canl extend entirely through the central portion of the slide from one recess to the other. There is enough play between the ears and Vthe notch walls to permit each spring strip to adjust itself into proper bridging position at either end of its stroke.

Accordingto the provisions of the patent statutes, we have explained the principle of our invention and have illustrated and described what we now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, we desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

We claim:

l. An lelectric slide switch comprising a housing having a slot in its top, a base for the housing spaced from said top, three spaced stationary contacts projecting from the upper face of the base in a line extending lengthwise of the slot, a slide disposed in the housing for movement lengthwise of the slot and provided with an actuating button projecting through one end of the slot, and a currentconducting spring strip having a central portion extending across the tops of two adjacent contacts in sliding engagement therewith spaced from said base, the portions of the strip at opposite ends of said central portion extending upward and inward toward each other and having`their upper ends pressing upward against the slide to press the strip against the contacts, the strip being movable longitudinally by the slide but always engaging the center contact, and the center of the strip having a detent projecting downward out of the plane of said central portion between the two contacts engaged by the strip, the side of said detent engaging the center contact, wherebythe strip is self-indexing.

2. An electric slide switch comprising a housing having a slot in its top, a base for the housing spaced from said top, three spaced stationary convex contacts projecting from the upper face of the base in a line extending lengthwise of the slot, a slide disposed in the housing for movement lengthwise of the slot and provided with an actuating button projecting through one endof the slot, and a current-conducting spring strip having a central portion extending across the tops of two adjacent contacts in sliding engagement therewith spaced from said base, the portions of the strip at opposite ends of said central portion extending upward and inward toward each other and having their upper ends pressing upward against the slide to press the strip against two of the contacts, the strip being movable longitudinally by the slide but always engaging the center contact, lthe opposite ends of said central portion of the strip being provided with downwardly projecting spherical detents for engaging the tops of the end contacts, and the center of the strip projecting downward between the center contact and the end contact engaged by the strip to make the strip self-indexing.

3. An electric slide switch comprising a housing having a slot in its top, a base for the housing spaced from said top, three spaced stationary contacts projecting from the upper face of the base in a line extending lengthwise of the slot, a slide disposed in the housing for movementlengthwise of the slot and provided with an actuating button projecting through one end of the Slot, the

bottom of the slide being provided with a recess above said contacts having a concave upper wall, and a current-conducting spring strip having a central portion extending across the tops of two adjacent contacts in sliding engagement therewith spaced from said base, the portions of the strip at opposite ends of said central portion extending upward and inward toward each other and having their upper ends provided with upwardly projecting spherical detents pressing against the upper wall o f said recess to press the strip against the contacts, and the center of the strip having an indexing detent projecting downward out of the plane of said central portion between the two contacts engaged by the strip until the slide is moved by its button toward the opposite end of the slot to move the detent across the center contact.

4. An electric slide switch comprising a housing having a slot in its top, a base for the housing spaced from said top, at least three spaced stationary contacts projecting from the upper face of the base in a line extending lengthwise of the slot, a slide disposed in the housing for movement lengthwise of the slot and provided with an actuating button projecting through one end of the slot, the bottom of the slide being provided with a recess above said contacts, and a current-conducting spring strip having a central portion extending across the tops of two adjacent contacts in sliding engagement therewith spaced from said base, the -portions of the strip at opposite ends of said central portion extending upward and inward toward each other and having their upper ends pressing against the top of said recess to press the strip against the contacts, the opposite sides of said central portion being provided with laterally projecting ears and the opposite side walls of said recess having notches therein loosely receiving said ears to connect the strip to the slide, and the center of the strip having an indexing detent projecting downward out of the plane of said central portion between the two contacts engaged by the strip.

5. An electric slide switch comprising a housing having a slot in its top, a base for the housing spaced from said top, two parallel rows of stationary contacts projecting from the upper face of the base, each row extending lengthwise of the slot and containing three convex contacts, a slide disposed in the housing for movement lengthwise of the slot and provided with an actuating button projecting through one end of the slot, the bottom of the slide being provided with a pair of parallel recesses above said contact rows, and a current-conducting spring strip above each row and having a central portion extending across the tops of two adjacent contacts in the underlying row in sliding engagement therewith spaced from said base, the portions of each strip at opposite ends of its central portion extending upward and inward toward each other and havingV their upper ends pressing against the top of one of said recesses to press the strip against two of the underlying contacts, the adjacent inner sides of the central portions of the strips being provided with ears projecting laterally toward each other and the portion of the slide between said recesses having notches therein loosely receiving said ears to connect the strips to the slide, and the center of each strip having an indexing detent projecting downward out of the plane of said central portion between the twoV contacts engaged by that strip, the sides of the detents engaging the center contacts. Y

References Cited in the tile of this patent Y i UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,740,535 Bramming Dec. 24, 1929 2,303,693 yHill Dec. l, Y1942 2,384,652 Smith Sept. 11, 1945 2,453,498 Crowley Nov. 8, 1948 2,550,145 Geci Apr. 24, 1951 2,588,793 Barry Mar. 11, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1740535 *Mar 1, 1928Dec 24, 1929Delta Electric CompanyElectric switch
US2303693 *Mar 15, 1940Dec 1, 1942Gen Motors CorpSwitch
US2384652 *Jul 21, 1943Sep 11, 1945Erie Electric Company IncRotary electric switch
US2453498 *Apr 15, 1947Nov 9, 1948Gen ElectricElectric switch
US2550145 *Jan 21, 1949Apr 24, 1951Stackpole Carbon CoElectric slide switch
US2588793 *Jul 28, 1950Mar 11, 1952Us Instr CorpRotary selector switch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2881280 *Feb 14, 1958Apr 7, 1959Chicago Telephone Supply CorpElectric snap switch
US2882358 *Jun 1, 1954Apr 14, 1959Boyne Products IncSwitch
US3072757 *Jan 22, 1960Jan 8, 1963United Internat Dynamics CorpElectromechanical device
US3106619 *Mar 31, 1958Oct 8, 1963Boyne Products IncTurn signal indicator switch
US3370261 *Jan 4, 1965Feb 20, 1968Cts CorpElectrical switch and combination electrical resistor and switch
US3399282 *Nov 15, 1966Aug 27, 1968Matsuku Kabushiki KaishaMultiple pushbutton switch
US3646300 *Apr 9, 1970Feb 29, 1972Alps Electric Co LtdContact switch
US3674953 *Sep 21, 1970Jul 4, 1972Uid Electronics CorpSlide switch with snap action
US4204104 *Oct 30, 1978May 20, 1980Stackpole Components CompanySlide switch
US4319100 *Jun 13, 1980Mar 9, 1982Amf IncorporatedDual in-line programming slide switch
US4737602 *Feb 27, 1987Apr 12, 1988Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaSlidable contact switch for card module
US4825020 *Apr 14, 1988Apr 25, 1989Tower Manufacturing CorportionSlide switch
US5051552 *Jul 16, 1990Sep 24, 1991Ilinois Tool Works Inc.Slide selector switch mechanism
US6841749 *Dec 7, 2000Jan 11, 2005Pass + Seymour, Inc.Slide switch for fan control
EP0018133A1 *Apr 2, 1980Oct 29, 1980AMP INCORPORATED (a New Jersey corporation)Electrical switch with several selectors
EP0097709A1 *Dec 23, 1982Jan 11, 1984Lucerne Products IncTrigger operated tool handle switch.
EP0097709A4 *Dec 23, 1982May 29, 1984Lucerne Products IncTrigger operated tool handle switch.
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/550, 200/16.00R, 200/291, 200/16.00D
International ClassificationH01H15/00, H01H15/06
Cooperative ClassificationH01H15/06
European ClassificationH01H15/06