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Publication numberUS2763289 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1956
Filing dateNov 17, 1952
Priority dateNov 17, 1952
Publication numberUS 2763289 A, US 2763289A, US-A-2763289, US2763289 A, US2763289A
InventorsErvin H Mueller
Original AssigneeErvin H Mueller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double outlet valve for controlling gas
US 2763289 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1956 E. H. MUELLER 2,763,289

DOUBLE OUTLET VALVE FOR CONTROLLING GAS Filed Nov. 17, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ll 3 4/ 2 53 32 6 4 4 46 4 v @i 34 I 24 v F/a. 2 28 x O L v 3 s\ 37 39 5 INVENTOR. Eel/1N H. MUELLER pt. 18, 1956 E. H. MUELLER 2,763,289

DOUBLE OUTLET VALVE FOR CONTROLLING GAS Filed NOV. 17, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 uvvzmoze. 767. /3. E/eV/N H. MUELLER A TTORNEYS.

United States Patent 2,7 63,289 DOUBLE OUTLET VAEXISE FOR CONTROLLING This invention relates to a double outlet valve for controlling the flow of gas to a double burner.

The object of the invention is to provide an improved valve construction which embodies a rotary valve element wherein the outlet for the gas to be supplied to one section of the burner is positioned substantially on the extended axis of the valve member and wherein the second outlet for the other burner section is displaced laterally from the axis.

A double burner, such as is sometimes used in the top burner system of a gas range, usually embodies an outer burner of ring form and a smaller inner burner section surrounded by the outer burner. Gas is supplied to both burner sections for a full high flame and is sup plied only to the center smaller burner section for a simmer flame, and a lesser volume of gas supplied to the smaller burner section for a low or warming flame. The valve of this invention is arranged to thus supply and control the supply of gas to such a burner.

Fig. 1 is a cross sectional view of a valve constructed in accordance with the invention showing some of the body construction and valve member construction.

Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view taken through the valve showing the inlet passages.

Fig. 3 is a view of the valve member.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view of the valve member showing some of the passageways therein.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken on line 3 showing a port in the valve member.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 3 showing another port in the valve member.

5-5 of Fig.

Fig. 7 is a cross sectional view taken on line 77 of Fig. 3 showing ports and grooves in the valve member.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 7 showing the valve in low position.

t Fig. 9 is a sectional view similar to Figs. 7 and 8 showing the valve member in simmer position.

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 7 showing the valve in full on position.

Fig. 11 is a view showing the click and limit washer.

Fig. 12 is an elevational view illustrating the cap.

Fig. 13 is a developed view illustrating the formation of the cap.

The valve illustrated in Fig. 1 has a body 1 with a tapered valve chamber 2 therein. A tapered valve member 3 is rotatably seated in the chamber and it has an operating stem 4 which projects through a cap, 6 secured to the body by screws 7. Wit in the cap is a washer 10 and disposed between the washer and the valve member 3 is a coil spring 11 which urges the washer toward the cap and seats the valve member.

The washer 10 has a D-shaped opening 13 which fits on a correspondingly shaped piece of the stem 4 so that the washer turns with the stem. The washer has teats or protuberances 14 and a projecting finger 15. The cap has a limit stop 16 and a limit stop 17 which are fashioned to extend inwardly in the valve body and the finger operates between the limit stops.

.by the control member 2,763,289 Patented Sept. 18, 1956 The valve cap is formed as shown in Figs. 12 and 13. It has areas a positioned in the normal plane of the cap upon which the teats ride when the valve is in oil position, as shown in Fig. 1. It has an elongated inclined surface I: for each teat terminating in a shoulder c, the shoulder 0 being located for one position of the valve member. Beyond the shoulder c is a bridge d and next adjacent the bridge d is a recess 2. The recess is located in another position of the valve member. Beyond the recess or depression e is the other surface a. It will be understood that the cap is formed with two opposite formations, such as shown in Fig. 12, one for each teat 14.

The body of the valve has a screw threaded extension 20 with an inlet port 21 and a secondary inlet port 22 which lead into the valve chamber. The body has a lateral extension 24 with an outlet port 25 and a second outlet port 26, both of which lead into an outlet passage 27 in a threaded extension 28 provided with a hood 29 and outlet orifice 30. The valve also has an outlet passage 31 in a threaded extension 32 provided with a hood 33 with an outlet orifice 34. This outlet is substantially on the projected axis of the valve chamber.

The valve member, as illustrated in Figs. 4 to 7, has a passage 36 therein and a port 37 positioned in a plane so that it may register with the port 25. It has a port 39 positioned in the plane to register with the inlet port 21. The valve member also has two circumferentially extending grooves 40 and 41 separated by a narrow divider element 42.

The stem 4 of the valve member is hollow as at 44 and the hollow portion terminates in a smaller axial passage 45. In the valve member is a transverse port 46 which connects into the passage 45 and opens on the periphery of the valve member, and a port 47 which extends from the passage 45 to the groove 41. As shown in Fig. 1 the ports 46 and 47 are angularly disposed so that their inner ends communicate into the passage 45 in a plane forward of the plane through the grooves 40 and 41. Also in the valve member is a port 50 which connects into the central passage 45 and the circumferential groove 4%. The grooves 40 and 4.1 and the port 46 are positioned to register with the port 26. The port 50 is advantageously radial so that its inner end is axially removed from the openings of the ports 46 and 47 in the passage 45. Within the valve member is a control and throttling element having a screw threaded body 51 threaded in the stem and a control element 52 extending therefrom and into the passage 45. The portion 52 fits in the passage 45 and has a blunt end as shown in Fig. 4. This control element may be advanced or retracted on its threads so that the blunt end thereof throttles or meters the port 50 as shown in Fig. 4.

In the off position of the valve, the finger 15 abuts the limit stop 16, as shown in Fig. 12. In this position, the

'inlet port 21 of the valve is closed because the port 39 is positioned upwardly as shown in Figs. 2 and 6 and the inlet port 22 is closed as illustrated in Fig. 7. If the valve be turned counter-clockwise to the position shown in Fig. 8, the port 46 registers with the inlet port 22 and the valve is in low position. That is, a small amount of gas which can be controlled with the member 52 passes through the port 46 into passage 45, then slightly axially and into the port 50, the inner end of which is metered 52. This gas passes out through the port 50, thence into the outlet passage 26. The port 50 may or may not be accurately aligned with outlet port 26 at this time. This small supply of gas passes out through the orifice 30 to the small section of the burner.

If the valve be turned further counter-clockwise to the Fig. 9 position, the circumferential groove 40 makes registry with the secondary inlet port 22 and a higher volume of gas flows through the groove and into the port 26.

This increase of volume of gas provides a simmer flame which is higher than the low flame. If the valve be turned further counter-clockwise to the Fig. position, then the port 39 is positioned downwardly and it registers with the main inlet port 21. Thus a full' supply of gas passes through port 39, passage 36, outlet passage 31, and the discharge orifice 34 for supplying gas to the main burner section. Also at this time the port 37 registers with the port for the supply of a full simmering volume of gas to the small burner section. At this time, however, the circumferential groove 40 still registers with the secondary inlet port 22 and gas passes into the same through port 50, port 47, and into circumferential groove 41 which registers with the port 26 for continued supply of gas for the small burner section. Thus with this latter arrangement the supply of gas is never cut off from the small burner section once the valve has been turned on even though the port 37 comes into and out of registry with the port 25. In other Words, when the valve is moved from the simmer position (Fig. 9), the small divider or land 42 causes a changeover of registry with port 26 from groove 40 to groove 41 such that the supply of gas to the port 26 and, therefore, to the outlet passage 27 is not discontinued even though for one reason or another, the valve may take the position where the port 37 does not register or properly register with the port 25.

When the valve is in full on position, the finger 1S rests against the limit stop 17. As the valve is turned from full on position clockwise, the situation is just reverse in that the valve first reaches or passes through the simmer position of Fig. 9, then low position of Fig. 8 and finally the off position of Fig. 7.

The cap and the click washer 10 cooperate to properly indicate to the operator the position of the valve member. Of course, the limit stops 16 and 17 determine the extreme positions of off and full on respectively. When the valve is in oil position, the teats or protrusions 14 rest against the area a and the washer is spaced from the cap as shown in Fig. 1, the spring being compressed in this action. As the valve is turned from off position, the teats ride down the inclined surfaces b, come into engagement with the shoulders c, ride up over the shoulders and traverse the bridge d and then snap into the recesses e giving an audible indication. The movement of the teats along the incline surfaces 12 and up over the shoulder c is silent and the resistance offered when the teats strike and ride over the shoulders c is substantially imperceptible bearing in mind that some effort of the operator has to be applied to turn the valve causing the resistance offered by the tapered plug in its tapered chamber.

The reason for this is that when the teats are at the position of the shoulders c the valve is in the low position shown in Fig. 8, and there is not sufiicient gas passing to the small section of the burner to satisfactorilyinitiate ignition. Therefore, the first audible indication given is when the valve reaches the simmer position of Fig. 9 when sufficient gas is provided to initiate ignition.

As the valve member is turned further counter-clockwise to full on position, the teats ride out of the recesses e and along the surfaces a. On the return stroke the teats snap into the recesses 2 giving an audible indication of the simmer position (Fig. 9); continued movement of the valve member counter-clockwise causes the teats to ride over the bridges d and they snap over the shoulder c giving an audible indication of the low position of the valve as shown in Fig. 8. Of course, the gas is ignited at this time and there is suflicient gas supplied to maintain combustion. Obviously, as the valve is turned further clockwise, it arrives at the off position shown in Fig. 7.

Accordingly, in the normal manipulation of the valve, it may be turned from off to the first indicated position which is simmer position where the gas is ignited. Once having established ignition the valve may be turned back and forth between the simmer position and the low position with an audible indication given in low positions. Also, when the valve is turnedv from full on position towards off, an audible indication is given at both simmer and low positions. However, this clicking arrangement has been described to fully disclose the intended manner of operation of the valve. The clicking arrangement of the click washer and cap constitute the subject matter of another application and is not claimed herein. The valve structure shown herein may be used with other clicking arrangements.

I claim:

A valve for controlling the flow of fuel gas to a burner having main and simmer sections, comprising a valve body having a chamber therein and main and simmer outlets for the respective sections including a simmer outlet port, a valve member rotatable in the chamber, said body having an inlet port circumferentially spaced from the simmer outlet port, the valve member having, a central passage, a first and second circumferential groove positioned in the same plane, a circumferentially narrow land separating the grooves, three passages all connecting into the said central passage, the first passage connecting into the first groove, the second connecting into the second groove and the third having an independent inlet end at the periphery of the valve member, the inlet port of the body being closed by the valve member in off position, said valve member being turnable from off position to a first position to register the inlet end of said third passage with the said inlet port and to register the first groove with the said simmer outlet port for the flow of gas at a low rate through the central passage and to the simmer outlet, said valve being turnable in the same direction to a second position to register the first groove with both the said inlet port and said simmer outlet port for the flow of gas to the said simmer outlet at a relatively higher rate, said valve member being turnable in the same direction to a third position to register the first groove with the said inlet port and the second groove with the said simmeroutlet port, with the said land positioned between the said inlet and simmer outlet ports, for the flow of gas through the central passage at a low rate to the said simmer outlet, adjustable flow control means in said central passage, the land having a dimension measured circumferentially which is less than the circumferential distance between said inlet and said simmer outlet port and such that it is incapable of closing said simmer outlet port, the valve body and the valve member having other inlet ports registrable in said third position for the passage of full flow of gas to said main outlet, and both having other ports registrable in said third position for the passage of gas to the simmer outlet at a relatively high rate of flow, whereby the flow of gas to said simmer outlet continues in all said positions of said valve member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,249,982 Rutherford July 22, 1941 2,262,703 Stuckenholt Nov. 11, 1941 2,299,666v Turner Oct. 20, 1942 2,632,469 Lamar Mar. 24, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2249982 *Jul 12, 1940Jul 22, 1941Detroit Brass & Malleable WorkValve
US2262703 *Dec 3, 1940Nov 11, 1941W J Schoenberger CompanyValve
US2299666 *Feb 12, 1941Oct 20, 1942Harper Wyman CoGas valve
US2632469 *Nov 13, 1946Mar 24, 1953Philip S HarperGas valve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2961000 *Jul 10, 1957Nov 22, 1960Harper Wyman CoRotary disc valve
US4738283 *May 4, 1987Apr 19, 1988Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd.Gas flow controller
US4862917 *Aug 3, 1988Sep 5, 1989Robertshaw Controls CompanyFuel control device, fuel control system using the device and method of making the device
US4947891 *Jul 12, 1989Aug 14, 1990Robertshaw Controls CompanyFuel control device, fuel control system using the device and method of making the device
US5027854 *Jun 15, 1990Jul 2, 1991Robertshaw Controls CompanyFuel control device, fuel control system using the device and method of making the device
US6520481 *Jul 2, 2001Feb 18, 2003Uwe HarneitLinearly regulated gas valve for gas burners
US8485217 *Jul 1, 2010Jul 16, 2013Ningbo Wanan Co., Ltd.Plug valve for gas stove
US20040081932 *Oct 23, 2002Apr 29, 2004Sen-Yu WuIgnition device for a grill
US20100032602 *Jul 30, 2009Feb 11, 2010Xie QibiaoGas valve with an improved valve core
US20120001110 *Jan 5, 2012Feng ZhangPlug valve for gas stove
EP1744085A1 *Jul 11, 2006Jan 17, 2007Lincoln Brass Works, Inc.Valve stem
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/599.17, 137/599.8, 251/297, 137/625, 137/905, 137/625.32
International ClassificationF16K5/12, F16K5/10
Cooperative ClassificationF16K5/10, Y10S137/905, F16K5/12
European ClassificationF16K5/12, F16K5/10