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Publication numberUS2763356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1956
Filing dateJul 15, 1954
Priority dateJul 15, 1954
Publication numberUS 2763356 A, US 2763356A, US-A-2763356, US2763356 A, US2763356A
InventorsWalter A Tratsch
Original AssigneeSeth B Atwood
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin testing device
US 2763356 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 18, 1956 Filed July 15, 1954 W. A. TRATSCH com TESTING DEVICE IN VEN TOR.

! gmajm/a ATTO NE Y5.

Sept; 18, 1956 w. A. TRATSCH 2,763,356

COIN TESTING DEVICE Filed July is, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNQS.

United States Patent COIN TESTING DEVICE Walter A. Tratsch, Chicago, 111., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Seth B. Atwood, Rockford, Ill.

Application July 15, 1954, Serial No, 443,457

7 Claims. (Cl. 194-101) This invention relates to a device for the separation of legitimate coins'of a particular denomination from illegitimate coins, slugs and the like, and relates more particularly to a coin-processing device of the type described which operates automatically to reject illegitimate coins, slugs and the like, counterfeits, and coins differing in dimension from the legitimate coins of the desired denomination, and which delivers the legitimate coins to a receiver for use in operation of a coin-controlled machine or device.

To the present, the devices which have been produced for the separation of illegitimate coins and slugs from legitimate coins, generally referred to as slug rejec-tors, have comprised rather complicated structures which make use of various moving parts and cradles to separate the coins in accordance to their physical characteristics, such as size, weight, and surface characteristics, followed by the testing of the coins which have passed these preliminary tests in accordance with their chemical characteristics or composition by passage of 'the separated coins through magnetic fields or the like. While such devices are generally capable of satisfactory operation for rejection of illegitimate coins and advancing the legitimate coins of the desired denominations for use in the machine or device, such devices make use of a great number of parts which are difficult to assemble and to maintain in proper operating condition. Thus it is an object of this invention to produce a coin-processing device of the type described which is manufactured of a few simple parts which are easily assembled and to a low cost unit adapted to process coins of a particular denomination; which because of its simplicity in construction and operation, remains in operable condition over a greater period of use without the need for replacement or repair; in which such repairs and replacement can'be effected easily and efiiciently without the need for skilled labor, and in which the device embodies flexibility in that adjustments can be made quickly and easily to modify the device for opera tion with coins of other denominations.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will hereinafter appear and for purposes of illustration, but not of limitation, an embodiment of this invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which Figure 1 is a sectional elevational view of acoin device embodying features of this invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the coin device shown in Figure l;

Figure 3 is a sectional elevational view taken along the line 3-3 of Figure 2; i

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4--4 of Figure 3;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary elevational view of the coin device shown in Figure 1, illustrating the operation thereof when a coin of lesser weight than legitimate coins of the desired denomination is processed through the device;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary view similar to that of Figure 5, showing the operation of parts when a slug con- Figure 7.is a fragmentary view similar to that of Figure 6, illustrating the operation as the steel slug is advanced further through the device.

While description herein will be made of the construction and operation of a device for processing coins such as a 5 piece, it will be understood that the device, with slight modifications in the spaced relation described, may be adapted for use in processing coins of other denominations without changing the principles upon which separation is efiected between illegitimate and legitimate coins of the selected denomination.

In the drawings, 10 indicates the framework of the front wall of a machine or device in which the coin-processing unit 11 is mounted for operation. An upper slot 12 is provided through the wall 10 through which an end portion of a coin shute extends having a coin hopper 13 secured to the outer end thereof in a manner to position the hopper outside of the machine for the insertion of coins therein. Another slotted opening 14 is provided in spaced relation below the first for communicating a reject coin receiver 15 with the curvilinear reject coin plate 16 of the coin-processing unit.

The coin-receiving hopper 13 comprises a pair of vertically-disposed walls 17 and 18 laterally spaced one from the other by an amount slightly greater than the thickness of coins adapted to be inserted therein for passage through the device, and the bottom and outer edge portions are joined by a bottom wall 19 and an end wall 20 to provide a slot between the walls dimensioned to receive coins inserted through the open end and to enable the inserted coins to slide downwardly through the slot into engagement with the downwardly-inclined bottom Wall 19 which advances the inserted coins through the open end adjacent the wall 10 of the machine through the opening 12 and onto the runway 21 in the coin shute of the coin-processing unit.

Referring now more specifically to the coin-processing unit, the numeral 22 represents a backing plate formed of metal or the like rigid material which is aligned more or less with the rear wall 18 of the hopper to enable passage of the coins smoothly from the hopper to the plate a for processing. The vertically-disposed backing plate 22 is backwardly-inclined so that the coins will, in part, bear upon the plate during passage through the unit. Secured to the front wall of the plate at an incline in alignment with the bottom wall 19 of the hopper is an elongate strip 23, the flattened upper edge of which functions as the incline runway 21 over which the coins roll during passage into the unit for testing.

All elongate rectangularly-shaped slot 24 is provided in the backing plate in closely spaced relation above the runway 21 and which is dimensioned to have a length greater than the maximum diameter of the coins adapted to :be processed therethrough and a width dimensioned to provide an opening considerably greater than one-half the diameter of the coin, with the upper edge of the opening spaced from the runway by an amount slightly less than the minimum diameter of the coin. With this construction, a coin of the proper size will be engaged at its upper edge by the edge portion 25 of the backing plate defining the upper edge of the slot 24 as the coin travels along the runway, thereby to prevent tipping of the coin backwardly into the slot. When, however, the coin 26 or other disk member which is inserted into the machine has a dimension smaller than the normal dimension of a proper coin, the upper edge of the coin or slug will be able to clear the edge 25 so that the coin will be able to tip through the opening, as shown in Figure 4, and fall backwardly onto the curvilinear coin return plate 27 which is spaced by a stud 28 from the rear wall of the p backing plate 22 and which guides the slug for return to taining iron or steel is processed through'the machine; and

the reject receiver '15.

A guide plate 29, which is secured to the upper end portion of the backing plate 22 above the slot 2'4,'has a spacer member 30 aligned with the runway 21 and which is spaced therefrom, by an amount slightly greater than the maximum diameter of the coin for guiding passage of the coin therebetween, and the guide plate is formed additionally with a ledge 31 extending downwardly from the outer edge thereof over a portion, of the coin slot for guiding same additionally during its travel over the runway. By substituting one guide plate for another, it is possible to vary the dimensional characteristics in the runway for use with various size coins.

The end portion of the strip 23 is formed with a curvilinear cut-out 32 to form a groove which enables a disk 33 formed of a permanent magnetic material to be mounted for free rotational movement on a stud 34 with the upper peripheral portion of the magnetic disk aligned with'the end portion of the runway 21 to form an end portion thereof over which the cointravels during passage through the unit. A bumper pin 35 extends outwardly from the backing plate 22 rearwardly of the magnetic disk or roller 33} and adjacent the lower edge portion thereof;

A rocker arm 36pivotally mounted at its upper end on stud 37 for free swinging movement over the face of the backing plate, depends into the path of the coin for engagement by the coin during its travel after leaving the runway toeffect swinging movement of the rocker arm, the magnitude of which depends upon the inertia of the coin whichin turn depends upon weight, since the weight will influence the direction of flight of the coin upon impact; A stop pin 38 is provided to.locate the rocker arm 36 in proper position to be engaged by the coin during. its flight.

Below the rocker arm 36, the backing plate 22 is divided into a forwardsection 39 and a rearward. section 40 as by means of a curvilinear abutment 41 secured, as by screws 42, to the. backing plate. The plate may be sectioned ass-described, by other means, such as by embossing the grooves into the face of. the plate or by the use of a cover plate formedlwith walls whichprovide the desired channels, for passage. of thecoins therethrough. The outer edge portiouofthe forward channel isformed with an outwardly-extending restrainingflange43-or plate which functions in combinationwith thet sectioning member 41 to provide a channelfor groove. therebetween extending curvilinearly downwardly into communication with the receiver 44 for the legitimate coins. Thebacking plate 22 is cut out at 45 in the rearward section 40 below the runway 21 to enablecommunica-tion through thissectiontothe curvilinear guide plate-27 which leads to the reject receiver 15.

In operation, the unit is vertically disposed at a backward tilt so that the coins that are inserted will tend to rest somewhat upon the backing plate and fall through wherever a suitable opening is available in its path of travel. When a coin 46 is inserted into the hopper 13, it will fall by gravitational force to the bottom wall 19 and then roll laterally downwardly over the inclined bottom wall of the runway 21 in alignment therewith into the testing unit.

If the coin is of larger dimension than the coin for which the unit is set, it will be enabled to be inserted into the coin-receiving slot of the hopper. If, on the other hand, the coin is of smaller dimension than the coins adapted to be processed, then the upper edge of the coin will clear the lower edge 25 of the backing plate defining the upper edge of the slot 24 as the coin 26 passes along the runway. As a result, the coin 26 will tip and fall backwardly gravitationally through the slot 24 onto the curvilinear plate 27 which will guide the coin for delivery to the reject receiver, as illustrated in Figure 4.

In the event that the coin 46 is of a proper size, it will continue its passage downwardly over the runway preferably with increasing speed so that, as it leaves the runway, it will have acquired a moment of inertia, the

magnitude of which will depend upon the weight of the com.

If the coin contains iron or other material attracted by the permanent magnetic roller, as illustrated by the coin having the numeral 47 in Figures 6 and 7, then it will be retained by the magnetic roller 33 and the combination of inertia and gravitational force will cause the coin to swing with the roller about its pivot until the coin engages at strikeoff pin 35 with sufficient force to cause displacement of the coin from the roller 33, as illustrated in Figure 7.

Upon displacement, the coin 47 will drop onto the curvilinear guide plate 27' for delivery to the reject receiver.

In the event that the coin is not suficiently attracted by the magnetic roller 33, itwill leave the end of the runway and travel along a path which will bring it into contact with the lower end portion of the rocker arm 36. If the moment of inertia which has been built up corresponds to that'which should be developed by a legitimate coin of the desired denomination, the coin 46 will deflect the rocker arm 36 out'of its path of travel so that it can continue its flight forwardly along a trajectory which leads into the forward section or channel 39 by which the coin is guided to the receiver 44 for legitimate coins, as illustratedin Figure 3.

Onthe other hand, if the moment of inertia is less than that which should have been developed by a coin of the desired denomination, such as when a slug 48 is formed of aluminum, plastics or the like lightweight material, the rocker arm 36 will be effective upon impacting engagement'with the slug to slow the flight of the slug sufficiently to cause the slug to take a different path of travel in response to gravitational force. As a result, the slugwill fallmore rapidly and enter the rearward channel 40,- as illustrated in Figure 5. The slug will then fall to the opening 45 onto the curvilinear guide plate 27 for return to the reject receiver'15.

As illustrated in the drawing, the backing plate of the coin hopper may'be conformed with additional openings 49', 50, andi51 respectively, dimensioned to be insufficient to interfere with the passage of the coins through the device. These openings may be employed, if desired, for feelers which operate to engage the rims or the surfaces of theicoins to prevent continued passage depending upon the characteristics of the surface, such as when a hole is present ina washer or the like which may be inserted inthe device.

Whenmodification is made for use with a coin of a different denomination, it may be necessary to displace the entrance too they channels 39 and 40 either forwardly or backwardly'depending upon the size and weight of the coin. Forthispurpose; it has'been found sufficient merely to provide a number of positions illustrated by the numeral 52 for receiving a post adjacent the upper edge of the sectioning member 41 to shift the eflective end in one direction or the other for guiding the direction of travel of the different coins.

It will be apparent that I have provided a simple and efficient means for use with coin-operated machines or devicestorejectcoins inserted therein of an improper denomination or of an improper composition, thereby to separate legitimate coins from illegitimate coins of a desired denomination. The device described embodies means which are elfective positively to displace illegitimate coins from the normal path of travel, and in which such means remain efiectivewithoutextensive maintenance or repairs or the requirement for frequent replacements thereby to enable use of the unit over an extended period of time efliciently to separate the coins.

It will be understood'that changes may be made in details of construction, arrangement and operation, w1thout departing from the spirit of the invention especial- 1y as defined in the following claims.

Iclaim:

1. Int-a coin testingdevice, .a coin chute having an inenea's'sa clined runway over which the coins travel laterally through the coin chute, a magnetic roller mounted for free continuous rotational movement with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins having a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway for travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement together whereby the coin swings with the roller out of the normal path of travel, and a strike-01f pin spaced from the roller in the path of the coin carried by the roller more than 90 from the point in alignment with the runway for knocking the coin oil the roller upon impact.

2. In a coin testing device, a coin chute having an inclined runway over which the coins travel laterally through the coin chute, a magnetic roller mounted for continuous free rotational movement with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins formed of a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway for travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement together whereby the coin is carried with the roller out of the normal path of travel, means in the path of the coin swinging with the roller to knock the coin ofi' of the roller after being turned out of the normal path of travel by an angle greater than 90, and a striker pin pivotally suspended in the normal path of travel of the coin after leaving the runway whereby the coin engages the pin with an impact that causes the pin to be deflected out of the path of the coin when engaged by a legitimate coin of the desired specific gravity and which deflects the coin from its normal path of travel when formed of a composition having a specific gravity less than that for the legitimate coin.

3. A coin testing device comprising a vertically disposed housing arranged at a backward tilt, a coin chute in the forward upper end portion of the housing, an inclined runway extending laterally at a downward incline through the coin chute over which the coins travel during passage through the coin chute, means spaced beyond the runway for separating the remainder of the housing into a forward channel in alignment with the path of travel of the legitimate coins upon leaving the runway and a rearward channel for receiving rejected coins which are displaced downwardly out of the normal path of travel for legitimate coins, and a magnetic roller mounted for continuous free rotational movement in the housing with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins formed of a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway and travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement together whereby the coin is carried with the roller out of its normal path of travel for displacement into the rearward reject channel.

4. A coin testing device comprising a vertically disposed housing arranged at a backward tilt, a coin chute in the forward upper end portion of the housing, an inclined runway extending laterally at a downward incline through the coin chute, means spaced beyond the runway for separating the remainder of the housing into a forward channel in alignment with the path of travel of the legitimate coins upon leaving the runway and a rearward channel for receiving rejected coins which are displaced downwardly out of the normal path of travel for legitimate coins, a magnetic roller mounted for free rotational movement in one direction in the housing with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins formed of a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway and travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement about the axis of the roller whereby the coin is carried with the roller out of its nor mal path of travel for displacement into the rearward reject channel, and a strike-off pin spaced a short distance rearwardly of the lower end portion of the roller in the path of coins carried by the roller for displacement of the coins from the roller upon impact.

5. A coin testing device as claimed in claim 3 in which the coin chute is formed with a slot above the runway dimensioned to have a length greater than the maximum diameter of legitimate coins adapted to be processed therethrough and a width greater than one-half of the diameter of the coin with the upper edge of the slot spaced above the runway by an amount slightly less than the minimum diameter of the coins.

6. A coin testing device comprising a vertically disposed housing arranged at a backward tilt, a coin chute in the forward upper end portion of the housing, an inclined runway extending laterally at a downward incline through the coin chute over which the coins travel during passage through the coin chute, means spaced beyond the runway for separating the remainder of the housing into a forward channel in alignment with the path of travel of the legitimate coins upon leaving the runway and a rearward channel for receiving rejected coins which are displaced downwardly out of the normal path of travel for legitimate coins, a magnetic roller mounted for free rotational movement in one direction in the housing with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins formed of a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway and travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement about the axis of the roller whereby the coin is carried with the roller out of its normal path of travel for displacement into the rearward reject channel, and a striker pin pivotally suspended in the housing into the normal path of travel of the coins after leaving the runway whereby coins having the specific gravity of legitimate coins of the desired denomination deflect the striker pin upon engagement for continued travel along a normal path into the forward channel while coins formed of a material having a specific gravity less than that for the legitimate coins are deflected from the normal path of travel downwardly into the rearward reject channel.

7. A coin testing device comprising a vertically disposed housing arranged at a backward tilt, a coin chute in the forward upper end portion of the housing, an inclined runway extending laterally at a downward incline through the coin chute over which the coins travel during passage through the coin chute, means spaced beyond the runway for separating the remainder of the housing into a forward channel in alignment with the path of travel of the legitimate coins upon leaving the runway and a rearward channel for receiving rejected coins which are displaced downwardly out of the normal path of travel for legitimate coins, a magnetic roller mounted for free rotational movement in one direction in the housing with its upper edge substantially aligned with the end of the runway whereby legitimate coins formed of a composition not attracted by the magnetic roller leave the runway and travel through a normal path while coins having a composition subject to magnetic attraction are held by the roller for turning movement about the axis of the roller whereby the coin is carried with the roller out of its normal path of travel for displacement into the rearward reject channel, a striker pin pivotally suspended in the housing into the normal path of travel of the coins after leaving the runway whereby coins having the specific gravity of legitimate coins of the desired denomination deflect the striker pin upon engagement for continued travel along a normal path into the forward channel while coins formed of a material having a specific gravity less than that for the legitimate coins are deflected from the normal path of travel downwardly into the rearward reject 7 channpl; and'staflqnary means adjacent the underside of 634,958 the roller for knocking off the coin carried by the roller 1,261,121 p Qn a s t- ,79 ,9 V 1,851,557 References Cited iri the file of this patent 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 287,321

416,521 Valentine Dec. 3 1889 8 Ray Oct. 17, 1899 Grover Apr. 2; 19-18 Runnels Mar. 17-, 1931 Wurzbach Mar. 29, 1932 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Mar. 22, 1928

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US416521 *Aug 31, 1888Dec 3, 1889 valentine
US634958 *Mar 10, 1898Oct 17, 1899Miles H RayApparatus for inflating bicycle-tires.
US1261121 *Jul 3, 1916Apr 2, 1918Autosales Gum And Chocolate CompanyMagnetic-slug deflector for coin-controlled machines.
US1796964 *Feb 28, 1929Mar 17, 1931Walter S RunnelsCoin-controlled vending apparatus
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GB287321A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3059748 *Feb 10, 1959Oct 23, 1962Zygmut S KrysiakMultiple coin separator
US3168180 *Jun 12, 1961Feb 2, 1965Nat Rejectors GmbhMoney-handling devices
US3244264 *Oct 7, 1963Apr 5, 1966Anchor Hocking Glass CorpMechanism for handling closure caps
US3357556 *Jun 14, 1965Dec 12, 1967Gerber ProdNon-destructive testing method and apparatus for canned liquid material
US3372783 *Aug 26, 1966Mar 12, 1968Lion Mfg CorpCoin chute structure
US3601238 *Aug 12, 1969Aug 24, 1971Vendall Machines LtdCoin sorter anvil mounting
US3889792 *May 8, 1974Jun 17, 1975Mars IncEnergy absorbing device for coin handling mechanisms and the like
US4014424 *Jun 9, 1975Mar 29, 1977Monarch Tool & Manufacturing CompanyDevice for testing the flatness, size and shape of coin-tokens
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/325
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00