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Publication numberUS2763873 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1956
Filing dateNov 21, 1952
Priority dateNov 21, 1952
Publication numberUS 2763873 A, US 2763873A, US-A-2763873, US2763873 A, US2763873A
InventorsSaunders Fred Q
Original AssigneeSaunders Fred Q
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable and collapsible bath for beds
US 2763873 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 25, 1956 F. Q. sAUNDERs PORTABLE AND coLLAPsIBLB BATH BoB BBDs Filed Nov. 21, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fred Q Saunders @m www Sept. 25, 1956 F. Q. SAUNDERS PORTABLE AND coLLAPsIBLB BATH FOB BBBs Filed Nov. 2l, 1952.

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENToR Fred Q Saunders razw A TTQRNEYS Sept. 25, 1956 F. Q. SAUNDERS PORTABLE AND coLLAPsIBLE BATH FOR BEDS Filed Nov. 21, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 JNVENToR. Fred Sazmders A TTORNEYS Sept. 25, 1956 F. Q. sAUNDERs PORTABLE AND COLLAPSIBLE BATH FOR BEDS Filed Nov. 21, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VEN TOR.

ATTUHNEYS United States Patent O rce PORTABLE AND COLLAPSIBLE BATH FOR BEDS Fred Q. Saunders, Richmond, Va.

Application November 21, 1952, Serial No. 321,897

7 Claims. (Cl. 4-177) 'I'he present invention relates to improvements in portable baths and more particularly to portable baths adapted for use on beds such as hospital beds and the like.

Heretofore, in the prior art, there have been innumerable proposed arrangements whereby bed patients or the like can be bathed somewhat as in a conventional tub so as to eliminate the usual sponge baths that bed patients usually must endure during confinement, Many of these proposed arrangements have been portable and some have been collapsible. One type of portable bath that has been proposed involves the mounting of a collapsible frame on the bed about the patient and the water-retaining fabric is on the bed for support thereby, ropes carried by the edge portions of the fabric being engaged over the collapsible frame for supporting the sides of the frame, and rods carried by the ends of the fabric being supported by the collapsible frame. An objection to this type of arrangement is that the collapsible framework is bulky and heavy for portable use and also presents relatively rigid surfaces against which the patient may undesirably bump. Such an arrangement is also likely to come into early disrepair if put to the extensive use to be expected in hospitals or homes.

Another arrangement has contemplated a rather complex framework arrangement that must be rigidly secured to the bed framework to provide longitudinally extending supporting bars which are utilized to support the side edges of waterproof sheeting, there being additional rigid framework for supporting the edge of the sheet at the foot of the bed, all of the framework of the arrangement being secured together. Here again the objections as to the weightiness and bulkiness of the arrangement exist as does the objectionable presence of rigid framework about the patient.

Still other arrangements contemplate the use of inatable tubs, simulating iniiatable life rafts in their nature, which tubs must necessarily be provided with means for inflating the same. Objections to this type of tub are that it is of relatively high initial expense, it requires means for inflating the same and it is also subject to puncture and accidental deilation.

Furthermore, in all of the previously proposed portable and collapsible bath tubs to my knowledge, there has not been a single disclosure of a suitable compact arrangement of a portable nature for controlling the hot and cold Water supply, the mixing of the hot and cold Water to a desired temperature, and the feed of the controlled temperature water into the portable bath with suitable vacuum breaker means in the uid control system.

Therefore, it has been a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved portable and collapsible bath which overcomes the difficulties inherent in setting up prior art arrangements and which otherwise obviates the objections connected therewith.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable and collapsible bath which is of extreme simplicity, requires no framework at the sides or Y 2,763,873 Patented Sept. 25, 1956 across the end of the bath and which contemplates the use of the corner posts of the bed proper for support, except where the corner posts are too short, in which case extensions are contemplated.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved construction for a portable and collapsible bath wherein the entire bath, exclusive of the supporting corner bed posts or the like, when in condition for bathing is comprised exclusively of flexible fabric.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable and collapsible bath construction wherein the bath is formed of a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof material and is provided with means for forming folded corner portions to define a liquidreceiving cavity.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable and collapsible bath arrangement which can be formed as an open top cavity for ordinary bathing purposes or drawn closed over at least a portion thereof for hydrotherapeutic treatment.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable fluid control system for portable and collapsible bath tubs which is both compact and effective in administering the required volume of liquid at the desired temperature.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved portable fluid control system which is equipped with an injector element for localized directing of a stream of air-filled water against a patient in the bath wherein the injector element is carried by an edge portion of the waterproof bath-forming sheet, regardless of whether the bath is drawn closed or left with an open top.

Other objects of the present invention are to provide an improved portable and collapsible bath which can be placed on a bed beneath a patient much in the same manner that sheets are changed and which can easily be manipulated into bath-forming relationship, or vice versa, and yet which is inexpensive and simple of manufacture. Still other objects and advantages will become apparent from the detailed description to follow.

The best form in which I have contemplated applying my invention is clearly illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. l is a perspective View of the portable and collapsible bath mounted on a hospital bed and showing the fluid control system mounted on a panel hooked over the foot of the bed, with others of the accessories;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially along the plane of line 2 2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a sectional View through the drain end of the flexible drain pipe, while Fig. 4 is a sectional view through the suction end of the drain pipe;

Fig. 5 is a top plan view of the bath in place on a bed and showing the normally open top drawn closed;

Fig. 6 is a plan view of the exible waterproof sheet stretched out flat and showing the arrangement of binding tape, straps, buckles, loops and belts of which the bath is comprised;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged perspective view showing the manner in which the corner portions of the flexible sheet are folded when arranged to form a bath;

Fig. 8 is a detail perspective view showing the arrangement of straps and loops and folded corner where a bed post extension is required;

Fig. 9 is a similar view to Fig. 8 but shows the arrangement where the bed corner post is utilized;

Fig. 10 is a vertical sectional View taken substantially along the plane of line 10-10 of Fig. 8;

Fig. 1l is an end elevational view showing the panel with the fluid control `system mounted thereon;

Fig. l2 is a vertical sectional View taken substantially along the plane of line 12-12 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 13 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially lalong the plane of line 13-13.of.Fig. .12.

vReferring now.more particularly to .thedrawings where- -in like numerals represent like parts throughout, ,it will Vbe seen that my improved portable and collapsible bath .is comprised of a exible waterproof bath-forming Vsheet designated generally by the numeral 10, as seenbest .in Fig. 6, supporting bar extension assemblies, lwhen Vnecessary, designated generally by the numeral 12 as seen best in Fig. 1, and a portable uid control system 14, as seen in Fig. l, which system includes the panel assembly 16, injector element 18, drain conduit .20 and other .requisite hoses or conduits.

Looking first .at .Figure 6 `wherein the bath forming sheet is best disclosed in its entirety, it will be seen that there is provided a substantially rectangular .sheet 22 which is formed yof any suitable thin -llexible waterproof material such as reinforced rubber sheeting. The-sheet 22 has binding tape or other .strengthening fabric tape secured to the side and end edge portions of the sheet, as at 24, 26,28 and 30, bydouble lines of stitching 32. The side portions 24 and 26 of the tape each -have an elongated flexible fabric strap 34 or V36 secured at their intermediate portions 38 and 40 by stitching 42 and 44 to intermediate portions of the tape so as .to provide strap free end portions 46 and 48 of strap 34 and 50 and 52 of the strap 36. End portions 54 and 56 of tape side portion 24 and end portions 58 and 60 of tape side portion 26 are free of the straps 34 and 36 but have secured thereto the outwardly extending strap-receiving loops 62, 64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74 and 76. The pair of loops 62 and 64 are of suflicient width to receive the strap 34 therethrough and are secured to opposite sides ofthe tape .24 by stitching at 78 and 80. The other pairs of loops are similarly secured to opposite sides of the tape side portions.

The tape side portion 24 also has secured thereto three buckles 82, 84 and 86, of conventional form, one of the buckles being medially disposed and the others being located at Ythe end portions 54 and 56. The other side portion 26 has three belt portions 88, 90 land 92 located opposite the buckles 82, 84 and 86 and adapted to be cooperatively associated therewith. Similar Vbuckles 94, 96 and 98, 100 are secured to the straps 34 and Y36 at the ends of the intermediate portions 38 and 40, respectively.

The end portions 2S and 30 of the tape each have an elongated strap 102 or 104 secured thereto at the medial portions 105 and 107 by the stitching 106 and 108. pair of buckles 110 and v112 is secured on opposite sides of the medial portion 105. A similar pair of buckles 114 and 116 is secured on opposite sides of the Vmedial portion 107. The remaining portions 118, 120, 122 and 124 of the tape end portions are substantially free of the straps 102 and 104 but have secured on the face thereof exposed in the view, spaced strap-receiving loops 126, 128, 130, 132, 134, 136, 137, 13S, 140, 142, 144 .and.146. The securement of the latter group of loops to the tapeis by lines of stitching through end portions of the loops and edge portions of the binding tape.

It will thus be seen that except for the provision of loops 62, 68, 70, 76 and 221, the face of the sheet not exposed in the view of Figure 6 is substantially completely free of straps, loops, buckles or the like and it is this surface that constitutes the inside surface of the bath when formed.

Looking now at Figures 1, and 11, details of the portable fluid control system will be described. The several elements of the system are mounted on the control panel 148 which may be constructed of wood, aluminum or other light weight material such as plastic. The panel is of substantially rectangular form and has the back surface thereof padded as at 150, rubber, leather, Leatherette or othersimilar material with filling therebenea'th being secured about the periphery of itheipanel. The ;padding.is,

.extension 236. .the casing 228 .for supporting. the same on the 'stiifencd of course, to prevent injury to the foot of the bed or whatever other surface may be employed for supporting the panel.

A pair of hook elements 152 and 154 are secured in spaced relation to the front face of the panel adjacent the top end thereof by screws 156. The U-shaped portions 158 of the hooks have sleeves of soft material such as rubber, leather or fabric for protecting the cross-bar 162 of the foot ofthe bed 11 or whatever other Vmeans is used for supporting the panel from becoming marred or otherwise damaged.

The front face of the panel .148 has mounted on an upper medial portion thereof a conventional automatic thermostatic mixing valve 164 .provided with the operating handle 166 for varying the temperature of the water between hot and cold limits. The valve 164 has a pair of diametrically opposed inlets 168 and 170 and an outlet 172 with an outlet conduit or `pipe section 174. Split clamps 176, 178 and 180 are secured .to .the panel 148 and embrace the pair of inlets 168 and 170and theoutlet 174 for firmly holding the mixing valve in place. It is to be noted that `the mixing Valve -164 is of the type that once it is set the water discharging therefrom will be of constant Atemperature regardless of the uctuations in pressure or incoming water temperatures. The -valves 182 and 184 are also of conventional form, their function being ,to adjust the amount .of tiow of incoming -hot water from the .inlet hose 186 Vand cold water from the inlet hose 18S. The valves 182 and 184 are .angle check valves and can be manually operable by the key 190 which is chained to the panel by the flexible element 19.2, the key being engageable in the open end bonnet portions 192 and 194, as will =be understood. The valves have unitarily formed therewith and in the outlet ends thereof conventionalstrainers at 196 and 198. The outlets of the .valves '182 and 184 are connected with the inlets of the mixing valve 164.

Hoses 186 and 188 are each approximately fifty (50) feet long, although .the length may be varied as desired, andhave standard hose screw end connections as at 200 for connection to the valves 182 and 184 and the hot and cold water sources which may be at a considerable distance from the bed bath.

The conduit or pipe 174 is directly coupled or connected with the temperature gauge 202 by connector 204 while anelbow206 from the connector 204 is connected tothe vacuum breaker 208, also of conventional construction. *The outlet 210 of the vacuum breaker '205 is connected to -a T-connection T212 and manually operated, mixed water valves 214 and 216 are connected to the outlets of the T-connection 212 by the ttings 218 for support by the T-connection and other elements of the iiuid control system. The valves 214 and 216 perform the function of controlling the 'ilow of mixed controlled temperature water into the bath via either or both of the hoses [220 and 2'22 coupled thereto as at '224 and '226. Hoses 220 and 222 are engaged through Vloop '221 which is secured to binding tape at the inside l(see Figs. l and 5).

Having reference to Figures ll `and l2, the details of the injector element 18 will be described. The injector is substantially of a conventional form with the exception that the nozzle end is directed in but one direction. lviy arrangement provides a single nozzle for localized directing of a stream of air and water mixture against the portion of the patients body to be given hydrotherapeutic treatment.

The injector element 18 is comprised of an elongated cylindrical `cas-ing '228 having a tube 230 extending therethrough with elbows 232 and 234 at each end joining thc casing and tubein concentric relationship. The upper elbow 232 .has anoutlet `plug connected .thereto and to which the hose 222 from the valve 216 of the .control panel Vcan be connected by .engagement'over the tubular A clamp 238 is `employed for embracing edge portions 24 and 34 (see Fig. 13) of the bath as will be described hereinafter.

Immediately below the elbow 232, the casing 228 is provided with a plurality of holes 229 into which air can be sucked by injection. The lower elbow 234 has a jet at 240 that receives water from the tube 230 that is in communication with the hose 222. As a result of the suction created by the water passing from the jet 240 air is drawn from the holes 229 (see Fig. 12) and through the passageway 242 for mixing with the water so that the stream passing from the nozzle 244 is a mixture of air and Water at a preselected temperature.

-Figure 13 gives the details of the clamp 238. The

lclamp is comprised of a horizontal C-shaped portion 239 through which the casing 22S is engaged and clamped by the thumb screw 246. Extending from the C-shaped portion is an inverted vertical U-shaped portion 248 which has a thumb screw 250 for clamping the binding tape 24 and strap 34 so as to support the injector element at the side of the bath.

The siphon hose and end connections are best shown in Figures l, 3 and 4. The siphon, suction or drain hose or conduit 20 is formed of flexible circumferentially ribbed material such as plastic or other suitable material, the cross-section of the conduit being shown in Figures 3 and 4. The drain conduit is preferably about twentyve (25) feet long and has one end thereof, Fig. 4, provided with an enlarged neck 252 which can either be molded thereon or otherwise secured in place to protect the conduit end. The other end, Fig. 3, is provided with a simple type of trap 254 of U-shaped form, the conduit end being received in the enlarged diameter portion of longer leg 256, cap 258 holding the same therein. Approximately eight (8) feet from the bath end of the drain conduit, I have provided a conventional knife type shut-off valve 260 having an operating handle 262.

In the type of ybed having four corner bed posts which all extend sufficiently high above the bed mattress to provide corner supports for the bath, there is no need for corner post extensions. However, as is the usual case the corner posts at the foot of the bed do not extend sufficiently high so l have devised an arrangement of extensions that may be readily attached and detached prior to forming the bath and when removing the same, respectively. Figures l and 2 show this arrangement 12. Looking first at Figure 2, the typeV of clamp will first be described. The clamp 264 is comprised of a first hinged portion including arms 266 and 268 hinged together by pin 270 with a screw 272 pivotally carried by the outer end of arm 268 at 274, there being a slot 276 in the outer end of arm 266 for engagement of the screw 272. A thumb nut 273 is engaged on the screw 272 so as to clamp the two semi-circular portions of the arms about the rods 280 which form the bed post extensions. The rods 289 may be hollow or solid but are preferably hollow and made of light-weight metal such as aluminum.

Joined to the arm 268 is a V-shaped portion 282 having rubber-like sleeves 284 over the legs thereof, and

terminating in outwardly angulated andapertured portions 286 through which bolts 288 extend. A clamping bar 290, having one end apertured at 292 and the other end provided with an open-ended slot 294, is engaged on the bolts 288 and wing nuts are threaded on the bolts for urging the bar 29) into clamping relationship with the V-shaped portion 282 so as to clampingly engage the corner bed post 296.

Figure l shows that a pair of the clamps 264 is utilized to clamp a single post extension 28 to the bed corner post.

Looking now at Figures 7 through l0, the manner in which the bed path is formed will be described. First the sheet shown in Figure 6 is engaged beneath the patient in the fashion that bed sheets are usually changed while the patient remains in bed. Of course, the face of the Sheet shown in Figure 6 is down for it is the other surface that constitutes the inside of the bath. Next the triangular corner fold is effected as shown best in Figure 7 by gripping the corner at 298 and folding the two thicknesses over the fore nger at 300 so as to form a fold commonly referred to as a hospital-type of corner such as used in folding the corners of sheets in making a bed. By so folding each corner along the sides of the sheet, it will be seen that there are four juxtaposed loops, three loops 137, 76 and 138 being on the outer two thicknesses of material at the corner while loop 74 is on the innermost thickness of material.

Assuming the corner being folded is at the foot of the bed B as seen in Figure 8 where the bed corner post has an extension, and assuming Figure 7 shows the sheet corner for the bath corner of Figure 8, it will be seen that the formation is effected by inserting the end 52 of strap 36 through loops 137, 76 (folded down over outer layer at 77 as seen in Fig. 10), and 138, in that order and then about post 280, above adjustable collar 281, and back again for securement in the buckle 100. Loop 74 is separately engaged over post 280 (Figure 8). At the foot end ofthe bath sheet the strap end 109 of the strap 104 is engaged through loop 140 and about the post 280 and back again to the buckle 114. Thus the corner construction for either side at the foot of the bed has been described and it will be seen that depending upon the height the tapes are about the posts, the height of of the bath sides will correspond.

At the head of the bed B a slightly different arrangement is necessary in View of the fact that post extensions are not required. Figure 9 shows the difference. The fourth loop 74 is not engaged about the bed post 297 for obvious reasons but instead the strap 36 is threaded through loops 137, 76, 138 and 74, in that order, and then about post 297 and back to the buckle 100. The straps when properly tightened in the buckles, tension the sides and ends and rmly support the same.

After the bath has been set up and it is desired to bathe a person, the temperature of the water is regulated by the fluid control system above described, the water going to waste until at desired temperature and then hose 220 is placed as in Figure 1 to supply warm water; valve 216 is closed and valve 214 is open.

In order to drain the bath, the valve 26) of the drain conduit is closed and the conduit is filled with water from the bath end by holding the conduit up so as to prevent trapping of air in the conduit. Then the bath Ior bed end 252 is placed beneath water surface in bath while the trap end is placed in a bath tub, toilet or other drain outlet, the trap being at least one foot below bed level. The valve 260 may then be opened and regulated as to rate of llow.

When it is desired to use the injector element, it is rst necessary to have at least enough water in the bath to be one inch above the outlet 244. As above described incoming air mixes with large volumes of air and may be directed for localized treatment.

The hose 220 is especially adapted to exhaust water until the desired temperature is reached prior to filling the tub, and can also be used to initially fill the tub or to prime the Siphon or provide water for washing. Further, two injector elements can be employed if desired.

In giving treatment it may be desirable to have the bath substantially enclosed except for the upper portions of the patients body. For this reason, buckles 82, 84 and 86 and belts 88, 90 and 92 have been provided. As seen best in Figure 5, the selected belts can be engaged in the respective buckles and drawing the same tight at the same time the side supporting straps are gradually loosened. Loop 74 is, of course, disengaged from rod 280. The injector element remains firmly supported by the stilfened edge portion of the bath.

In most hospital beds, there is provision for elevating sections thereof, as by a crank 301. Thus in giving a patient a bath or treatment, it may be desirable to elevate r o the head ofthe bed. This can be accomplished without interfering with the functions of the tub by operating the crank 301 so as to elevate the head of the bed to the position ,303 shown in dotted lines in Figure l. The portion of the bath supported thereby will, ofcourse, vbe correspondingly raised. ln this manner, the upper portion of the vbody of the patient can 'oe maintained out of 'the water. The limit of upward adjustment is .to the strap 26.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that `l have provided an arrangement that will accomplish all of the objects hereinbefore set forth. The bath and fluid contr-ol system is especially adapted for giving bed-ridden patients baths as well as hot bath treatments where temperature control is important and/or where it is desirable to .direct a jet of air-Water mixture against areas of a patients body. It Will also be seen that the bath is fully collapsible and portable .and requires no framework about :its sides and ends.

I claim:

1. A portable bath forming sheet for use on a bed having corner posts comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof flexible material, straps having intermediate portions thereof ixedly carried by side and end edge portions of said sheet and each providing a pair of free ends adjacent to each corner portion of said sheet, buckles carried by said straps for securement rof the free ends of said straps, and strap-receiving loops carried by the corner edge portions of said sheet and adapted to receive the strap free ends therethrough so as to retain in position folded corner portions formed in the sheet and form post encircling looped ends in the straps at the folded corner portions.

2. A portable bath forming sheet for use on a bed having corner posts comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof flexible material, reinforcing and stiffening binding tape secured to the side and end portions of said sheet, straps having intermediate portions thereof ixedly secured to intermediate side and end vportions of said binding tape and each providing a pair of free ends adjacent to each corner portion of said sheet, buckles carried by said straps for securement of the free ends of said straps, and strap-receiving loops carried by the corner portions of said binding tape and adapted to receive the strap free ends therethrough so as to retain in position folded corner portions formed in the sheet and form post encircling looped ends in the straps at the folded corner portions.

3. A portable bath forming sheet for use on a bed having corner posts comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of Waterproof flexible material, straps having in` termediate portions thereof secured to and along intermediate side and end edge portions of one faceof said sheet and providing a pair of free ends adjacent each corner portion of said sheet and leaving corner edge portions of said sheet free of said straps, buckles carried by said straps for securement of the free ends of said straps, each side edge of the corner edge portions having a pair of spaced strap-receiving loops secured thereto and extending outwardly thereof, and each end edge of the corner edge portions having a pair of spaced strap-receiving loops on and secured to the said one face thereof, said loops being adapted to receive the strap free ends therethrough so as to retain in position folded corner portions of the sheet and form post encircling looped ends in the straps at the folded corner portions.

4. A bath tub forming sheet for use on a bed having corner posts for beds comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof flexible material, binding tape secured along the side and end edge portions of the sheet, straps having intermediate portions thereof secured to and extending along intermediate side and end portions of one face of said binding tape and providing a pair of free ends adjacent each corner portion of said sheet and Vleaving corner portions of said binding tape free of said straps, buckles `carried by said straps :for securement :of the free ends of said straps, each .of the side corner portions of the binding tape having a :pair of strap-receiving loops secured thereto and extending outwardly thereof, .and each of the end corner portions lof the 'binding tape having a pair of strap-receiving loops secured thereto yon the one face thereof, said loops being adapted to receive the strap free ends therethrough so as to retain in position folded corner portions of the sheet and post encircling looped ends in the straps at the folded corner portions.

5. A portable bath forming sheet for use on a 'bed Vhaving corner posts comprising a substantially rectangu-l lar sheet of Waterproof 'flexible material, binding tape secured along the side and endedge portions of said sheet, straps having intermediate portions thereof xedly secured to and along intermediate side and end portions of said'binding tape and lproviding a pair of free ends adjacent each corner portion of -said sheet, buckles secured to said intermediate portions of said straps for securement of the free ends of said straps, and strap-receiving loops carried bythe corner portions of said binding tape and adapted to receive the strap free ends therethrough so as to retain in desired position folded corner portions of the sheet and form post encircling looped ends in the straps at the folded corner portions, and a plurality of spaced buckles secured to said binding tape at one side of the sheet, and a plurality of cooperatively disposed belts each secured at one end thereof to the binding tape at the opposite side of said sheet and opposite from one of the last named buckles and adapted for securement by said spaced buckles whereby the sides of the sheet may be drawn together.

6. A portable bath for beds comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof flexible material, means secured to the periphery of said sheet for holding the corner portions of the sheet in folded relationship and providing supporting loops at the corner portions of the sheet, the supporting loops being adapted to .be engaged about the bed corner posts or the like for supporting the sheet in its bath-'forming relationship, said means including additional loops carried by the corner edge portions of said sheet ,and straps and buckles carried by intermediate edge portons of said sheet, the straps being .engageable through said additional loops and with said buckles.

7. A portable bath for beds comprising a substantially rectangular sheet of waterproof flexible material, means secured to the periphery of said sheet for holding ythe corner portions of the sheet in folded relationship and providing supporting loops at the corner portions of the sheet, the supporting loops being adapted to be engaged about the bed corner ,posts or the like for supporting the sheet in its bathforming relationship, and at least a pair of bed post extensions for the bed, said extensions including elongated bars, each har having at lleast one double clamp for securing the same to the juxtaposed bed corner post of which it is to be the extension.

References Cited in the le of this ,patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 568,811 Stoll Oct. 6, 1896 576,846 Hermes Feb. 9, 1897 1,444,487 Volters Feb. 6, 1923 1,451,437 Bernier Apr. 10, 1923 1,472,877 Lichtenstein Nov. 6, 1923 2,264,876 Hackley Dec. 2, ,1941 2,607,044 Kennedy Augf19, 19.52

FOREIGN PATENTS 8,205 Great Britain May 15, 19,02 144,772 Germany Sept..22, 1903

Patent Citations
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US568811 *Jun 22, 1896Oct 6, 1896 Combination bed and bath for invalids
US576846 *Jul 30, 1896Feb 9, 1897 Apparatus for supplying and heating water
US1444487 *Jul 5, 1921Feb 6, 1923Edward VoltersCollapsible bathtub
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2947996 *May 23, 1957Aug 9, 1960Newman Louis BHydrotherapy tank
US3366978 *Jun 1, 1965Feb 6, 1968Ruth V. JonesChair heighth collapsible bathtub
US3469266 *Oct 13, 1967Sep 30, 1969Hyde Burt ECollapsible bath tub
US3681789 *Feb 10, 1971Aug 8, 1972Edward BottCompliant bath and rinse receptacle
US3701170 *Jul 8, 1971Oct 31, 1972Bond James MApparatus facilitating care of a bedfast patient
US3800336 *Sep 23, 1971Apr 2, 1974Cass CPortable bed bath
US3803642 *Sep 22, 1971Apr 16, 1974Cass CFoldable bed bath
US4142259 *Feb 6, 1978Mar 6, 1979Moore Helen BInvalid bathing assembly
US4312084 *Nov 30, 1979Jan 26, 1982Browning Robert KInflatable bathtub for bedridden patients
WO1996024321A1 *Feb 1, 1996Aug 15, 1996Elosegui Julian RuizBathtub on bed for immobile patients
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/588
International ClassificationA61G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G7/0005
European ClassificationA61G7/00B