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Publication numberUS2765129 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1956
Filing dateSep 8, 1953
Priority dateSep 8, 1953
Publication numberUS 2765129 A, US 2765129A, US-A-2765129, US2765129 A, US2765129A
InventorsCharles K Dunlap
Original AssigneeSonoco Products Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Textile carrier and method
US 2765129 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2, 1956 c. K. DUNLAP TEXTILE CARRIER AND METHOD Filed Sept. 8; 1953 INVENTOR. CHAR/15S K. DUNLAP ATTOENIIKS United States Patent C TEXTILE CARRIER AND METHOD Charles K. Dunlap, Hartsville, S. C., assignor to Sonoco Products Company, a corporation of South Carolina Application September 8, 1953, Serial No. 378,710

3 Claims. (Cl. 242-122) This invention relates to textile cones and the like adapted to serve as a supporting core for yarn packages, and more particularly to a textile cone or similar yarn carrier of this type having a winding surface specially conditioned for free, even-tensioned withdrawal of the inner windings of a yarn package supported on the cone, and having moisture resistant properties.

As is well known, yarn is handled for many textile operations in the form of so-called packages, wound on tubular cores, particularly paper cones such as are contemplated by the present invention. The yarn is disposed in packages on the cones by winding in a helical pattern, this helical pattern reversing as each end of the cone is reached so that the yarn forms a loop at the end portions of the cone with each reversal.

In handling the yarn packages in textile operations, it is common practice to arrange them for automatic transfer by tying the trailing end of a package from which yarn is being withdrawn to the leading end of another yarn package so that when the first package is exhausted, yarn withdrawal will continue without interruption from the second package. The high operating speeds characteristic of modern textile operations require a free, even-tensioned withdrawal of the yarn to accomplish this transfer, for at the high operating speeds employed any substantial variation in tension or jerking of the yarn will result in frequent breaking and thus nullify the advantage obtained through automatic transfer.

A free, even-tensioned withdrawal of the yarn is not easily obtained because of the necessity for securing the yarn packages against slippage on the conical supporting cores. The conical form of the supporting cores makes it difficult to place the inner windings of the yarn package on the cores without slippage at the end loops, and the completed yarn package further has a tendency to slip bodily on the supporting core toward the smaller end and thus disengage itself.

To avoid this slippage, it is usual to configurate the end portions of the cones to provide gripping surfaces adapted to maintain the end loops of these inner windings in place, and to lay the windings on tightly for engagement of these gripping surfaces. In paper cones of the usual type, the winding surface is relatively yielding so that tight Winding of the yarn package has a tendency to imbed the inner windings in the winding surface of the cone, which results in the imposition of an increased and uneven tension on the yarn when the inner windings are reached for withdrawal just prior to transfer, and consequent troublesome difficulty with breaking of the yarn.

According to the present invention, the above noted difliculties are overcome by forming the textile cone with a resin coated paper body having an exterior surface developed in a sizing dye to provide a smooth, slick, relatively unyielding, and protectively coated winding surface, and adhesively securing discrete fibres on this exterior surface in circumferential bands adjacent the ends of the cones for retaining the end loops of the inner winding in place. A textile cone having a winding surface conditioned in this manner allows a smooth and even withdrawal of the yarn windings, and the use of adhesively secured fibres on this winding surface makes it possible to provide a gripping surface adjacent the ends of the cone of a balanced nature sufiicient to retain the end loops of the inner windings in place without interfering with the even tensioned withdrawal of the yarn.

A further feature of the textile cone of the present invention is that a coating resin is used having waterproofing properties, such as a phenol-formaldehyde resin, which will impart moisture resistance to the cone and thus condition it for more serviceable use in the humid atmospheres in which textile operations are commonly carried out. Also, by using adhesively secured fibres for retaining the end loops of the inner windings in place, the winding surface may be invested with these fibres without destroying its integrity, so that the winding surface is not opened up to impair its moisture resistance as is the case when the gripping surfaces are provided by abrading or otherwise roughening the end portions.

These features of the textile cone of the present invention are particularly important in handling the low twist yarns now being used in increasing quantities in the textile industry. These low twist yarns have presented a very difiicult handling problem, because they tend to hang on the least irregularity in the cone winding surface with resulting frequent breaks in creeling off and defective fabric through breaks or uneven tension in knitting off.

In the ordinary type of cone, roughness or surface irregularities can develop in a number of ways during the regular course of production, such as from flakes of adhesive, broken edges, crushed paper and so forth. And even if this roughness is ironed out in a sizing die or the like, it tends to return when the cone is subjected to moisture during use. The resin treatment provided according to the present invention avoids this difliculty by making it possible to form a hard, slick, winding surface on the cones which has excellent moisture resistance.

In addition to the moisture resistance obtainable with a resin treatment, the resin treatment employed according to the present invention also provides a protective coating on the cone winding surface. The kraft paper stock from which paper textile cones are commonly made is usually formed from a pulp containing a substantial percentage of reclaimed newspaper. As a result the kraft stock characteristically contains certain extraneous or foreign substances which are apparently derived from the print on the newspaper or from waste material mixed with the reclaimed newspaper. These foreign substances tend to work to the surface of the kraft stock, so that they are usually present on the winding surface of paper textile cones.

it has been found that the oils used in processing certain yarns, particularly rayon, will dissolve these foreign substances sufficiently to cause them to bleed into yarn carried on the cone winding surface. This result is highly undesirable because the foreign substances are not removed by bleaching. When the textile cones are resin treated in accordance with the present invention, however, the protective coating provided on the winding surface of the cones precludes this bleeding of the foreign substances and thus avoids the above noted troublesome contamination of the yarn.

Moreover, this protective coating formed on the cone winding surface prevents the cone from absorbing or wicking out the processing oils from the yarn such as usually occurs when paper textile cones are used.

The textile cone of the present invention and its method of manufacture are described in further detail below in connection with the accompanying drawing which shows a side elevation, partly cut away, of a cone embodying the invention.

Fatented Oct. 2, 1956 As shown in the drawing, the textile cone of the present nv ntion. comp ises a onical p p body 1 formed y winding a semi-circular blank upon itself convolutely to provide a laminated paper structure held together by adhesive applied to the paper blank before Winding. The paper body 1 may be made up from any uitable paper stock, although kraft stock is usually used as noted above. Also, instead of a wound laminated paper body as described above a molded paper body might be used if desired.

After Winding, the small end of the conical paper body 1 is preferably turned in to form a smooth tip portion or nose as indicated at 2 in the drawing. The tip portion 2 may otherwise be formed a illustrated and described in my prior United States Patents Nos. 1,896,135 and 2,914,040, if desired. The step of forming the nose portion 2 may be carried out separately or during the sizing operation described further below.

The resin coating of the conical paper body 1 may be carried out effectively either by mixing the resin with the adhesive applied to the blanks before winding, or by dipping the paper body 1 in the resin after winding. In the usual case it is more convenient to mix the resin with the adhesive. The adhesive commonly employed in forming the paper cones is starch paste, and a phenol-formaldehyde resin, or any other compatible resin having the waterproofing properties required by the present invention, maybe mixed with the starch paste. In practice, mixtures in equal parts of the starch paste and resin have been found to give good results, although this proportion may be varied somewhat in accordance with the effect desired and the resin employed.

Following resin treatment of the paper body 1 either with an adhesive-resin mixture, or by dipping after winding, the exterior surface of the paper body 1 is conditioned in a heated sizing die to develop the moisture resistant properties of the resin and provide a smooth, slick, relatively unyielding, and protectively coated winding surface as indicated generally at 3 in the drawing. This sizing die may be constructed in any conventional manner to comprise a heated die block having a conical cavity proportioned to receive the paper body 1, and a supporting mandrel for disposing and rotating the paper body 1 in the cavity of the die block. A controlled heat can be applied in this manner to develop the resin and cause it to fiow, and the rotation of the paper body 1 by the mandrel provides an ironing effect which develops the smooth, slick, winding surface and forms the protective coating on this winding surface as previously noted.

After dimensional sizing of the paper body 1 in this manner, the winding surface 3 is invested adjacent its ends with the circumferential bands of discrete fibres as represented by the numerals 4 and 5 in the drawing for retaining the end loops of the yarn windings in place. As pointed out above these discrete fibres are adhesively secured on the winding surface 3 so that they do not break the protective coating formed on the winding surface 3 or otherwise impair its integrity. These discrete fibres may suitably consist of cotton flock or the like and may be applied by blowing the iibre flock onto the adhesive, which has previously been sprayed or otherwise suitably applied on the areas corresponding to the circumferential bands. The retaining characteristics of the circumferential bands 4 and 5 provided in this manner can be varied independently of the nature of the winding surface 3, so that by adjusting the pattern in which the circumferential bands 4 and 5 are arranged, or by selection of the type of flock used, or by controlling the density in which the flock is applied, or by regulating some combination of these factors, the circumferential bands 4 and 5 can be nicely balanced in relation to the winding surface 3 for even-tensioned withdrawal of the yarn.

In the usual case, a proper width for the circumferential band 4 at the base of the paper body 1, is from 4 inch to 1 inch, and for the circumferential band 5 at the tip,

Lil

ends of the carrier and in widths relative to the intermedi-.

ate unfiocked portions of the carrier to eifect desired retention of the yarn wound on the carrier, and yet easy uniform unwinding of the yarn from the carrier when in use.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my application Serial No. 16,120, filed March 20, 1948, now abandoned.

Various modifications and changes may be made in the materials and procedures described hereinabove within the scope of this invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A textile cone adapted to serve as a supporting core for a yarn package wound thereon comprising a conical paper body formed from a convolutely wound paper blank coated with an adhesive composition containing a phenolof a yarn package supported on the cone, and discrete fibres adhesively secured on said exterior surface without disturbing the integrity of said protective coating, said discrete fibres being secured in circumferential bands adja-' cent the ends of said paper body for retaining the end loops of the inner windings of said yarn package against slippage on said winding surface during winding and subsequent use.

2, A textile cone adapted to serve as a supporting core for a yarn package wound thereon comprising a conical paper body formed from a convolutely wound paper blank and having the windings thereof secured by an adhesive composition containing a waterproofing resin component, the exterior surface of said paper body having all of the surface irregularities thereof laid smooth and set in place by a protective coating of said resin component formed in situ, whereby said paper body is provided with a smooth, slick, unyielding, and moisture resistant winding surface adapted for free and even-tensioned withdrawal of the inner windings of a yarn package supported on said cone, and discrete fibers adhesively secured on said exterior surface without disturbing the integrity of said protective coating, said discrete fibres being secured in circumferential bands adjacent the ends of said paper body for retaining the end loops of the inner windings of said yarn package against slippage on said winding surface during Winding and subsequent use.

3. A textile cone adapted to serve as a supporting core for a yarn package wound thereon comprising a conical paper body fronted from a convolutely wound paper blank coated with an adhesive composition containing a resin having waterproofing properties mixed in substantially equal parts with a starch paste, said paper body having an exterior surface which all surface irregularities are laid smooth and set in place by said resin and on which said resin forms a protective coating whereby said paper body is provided with a smooth, slick, unyielding, and moisture resistant winding surface adapted for free, eventensioned withdrawal of the inner windings of a yarn package supported on the cone, and discrete fibres adhesively secured on each end of said exterior surface without disturbing the integrity of said protective coating, where- References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Diefienbach Jan. 30, 1934 Kniesche Mar. 24, 1936 6 Fallscheer Apr. 6, 1937 Moyer Jan. 14, 1941 Perry Aug. 24, 1943 Gartrell Aug. 5, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Nov. 30, 1936 France Feb. 7, 1951 France Feb. 7, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1944970 *Jul 29, 1933Jan 30, 1934Dieffenbach Otto WContinuous method of making sheet cellulose tubes
US2035320 *Mar 5, 1934Mar 24, 1936Joseph ShapiroMethod of manufacturing cellulose tubes
US2076451 *Mar 29, 1934Apr 6, 1937Fallscheer FritzDevice for producing tubes or bobbins of the kind used in the textile industry for receiving the yarn
US2228475 *Nov 1, 1938Jan 14, 1941Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoComposite pirn
US2327738 *Mar 13, 1942Aug 24, 1943Universal Winding CoTextile core
US2605979 *Dec 10, 1947Aug 5, 1952Us Rubber CoPlastic bobbin for textile machines
FR983348A * Title not available
FR983349A * Title not available
GB457553A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2938370 *Apr 9, 1958May 31, 1960Sr Denzil R BrossardFleshing pole
US4057201 *Jun 16, 1976Nov 8, 1977Alton Box Board CompanyYarn core including slip resistant transfer coating
US5056733 *May 1, 1990Oct 15, 1991Sonoco Products CompanyTubular yarn carrier having improved nose construction
US5120294 *Jun 11, 1991Jun 9, 1992Sonoco Products CompanyMethod and apparatus for forming a tubular yarn carrier
US6595456Sep 19, 2001Jul 22, 2003Sonoco Development, Inc.Textile tube with start-up feature
US6732964Jun 28, 2002May 11, 2004Sonoco Development, Inc.Yarn winding tube with removable end ring
US6779751Jun 9, 2003Aug 24, 2004Sonoco Development, Inc.Method of using a textile tube with start-up feature
US6926222Jul 7, 2004Aug 9, 2005Sonoco Development, Inc.Textile tube with start-up feature
US7527586Dec 27, 2006May 5, 2009Sonoco Development, Inc.Winding core for fabrics
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/118.32, 236/9.00R
International ClassificationB65H75/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2701/31, B65H75/18
European ClassificationB65H75/18