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Publication numberUS2765473 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1956
Filing dateDec 28, 1953
Priority dateDec 28, 1953
Publication numberUS 2765473 A, US 2765473A, US-A-2765473, US2765473 A, US2765473A
InventorsJames B Doyle
Original AssigneeJames B Doyle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rain hood scarf
US 2765473 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. B. DOYLE RAIN HOOD SCARF Oct. 9, 1956 Filed Dec. 28, 1953 IN V EN TOR.

JAMES B. DOYLE ATTORNEY United States Patent 2,765,473 RAIN HOOD SCARF James B. Doyle, Ann Arbor, Mich. Application December 28, 1953, Serial No. 400,706 3 Claims. (Cl. 2-207) My invention relates to a new and useful improvement in a rain hood scarf, in which there is combined with a womans scarf a rain hood which is concealed when the garment is worn as a scarf and which may be easily and quickly moved into position for use as a rain hood.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a womans scarf so constructed and arranged that, when desired, a portion thereof, which is formed from waterproof material, may be folded outwardly into position for use as a hood.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a womans scarf having waterproof parts secured along two of the edges of the scarf at one corner thereof so that, when moved into position for use, a portion of the waterproof material may cover the head of the wearer and the other portion may depend downwardly back of the head to form a water shedding portion.

Other objects of the invention will appear hereinafter.

It is recognized that various modifications and changes may be made in the detail of the structure illustrated without departing from the invention, and it is intended that the present disclosure shall be considered to be but the preferred embodiment.

Forming a part of this application are drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a plan view of the invention.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the invention with the hood-forming portions arranged for use.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view through the garment with the hood-forming portions arranged for use.

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view showing the invention being used as a hood.

In Fig. 1 I have shown a scarf 7 formed from any suitable material. These scarves are generally formed from an ornamental material, and, of course, in selecting the material to be used in the garment, the choice of the manufacturer or wearer would prevail.

In Fig. 1 I have shown the garment rectangular. This is the prevailing shape of a womans scarf, but the particular shape would not necessarily affect the scarf when combined with the hood-forming portion.

In the drawings there is shown, stitched or otherwise secured along the edges 8 and 9 of the scaf 7 and leading to the corner 10, a fabric portion 11, which is formed of suitable waterproofing material.

Secured along the same edges 8 and 9 is a smaller piece 12 of waterproof material, which, when the garment is used as a scarf, may be secured to the portion 11 by the snap fastener portions 13 and 14.

In Fig. 2 I have shown this waterproofing portion lying to the left of the garment 7. When it is desired to use the garment as a waterproof hood, the portion 12 will be folded upwardly so as to depend on the right side of the garment 7.

In Fig. 4 I have indicated this arrangement but with a reverse positioning of the parts. The portion 11 is i1- lustrated as depending on the right of the garment 7, and the hood-forming portion 12 is indicated as folding over the garment 7 so as to lie to the left of the garment 7.

As clearly shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 5, the portion 12 forms a hood which will cover the upper part of the head 15 of a wearer, and the portion 11 will hang downwardly below the neck of the wearer.

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When used as a scarf (not shown), the scarf would be so positioned on the body of the wearer that the waterproof members would be beneath the garment and thus concealed from view. Consequently, from all outward appearances, it would be indicated that the person was merely wearing a scarf of conventional type. This would be the case where the person was wearing the scarf merely as a garment surrounding the neck and falling over the shoulders, or as head covering.

In the event of rain or snow, the portion 12 may be turned as shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 4 and placed upon the head of the wearer as shown in Fig. 5, with the moisture repelling portion 11 depending on the neck of the wearer as shown in Fig. 5.

In this way I have provided a simple and attractive scarf which will serve the dual purposes referred to and which has proven highly efiicient in use.

What I claim is:

1. A scarf of the class described, comprising: a fabric body having a pair of angularly disposed converging edges, a first triangularly shaped waterproof body disposed on said fabric body with two converging edges thereof being in alignment with said angularly disposed converging fabric body edges, a second triangularly shaped waterproof body disposed on said first waterproof body with two converging edges thereof being in alignment with said angularly disposed converging fabric body edges, said waterproof bodies being secured to the fabric body along the aligned converging edges thereof, said second waterproof body being smaller than said first waterproof body; and said second waterproof body being foldable about the secured edges thereof to form a top portion of a waterproof hood which is adapted to extend to the forehead of a user, with the back portion for said waterproof hood being formed by said fabric body and extendable down over the shoulders of a user, and with the first waterproof body forming an outer cover for the upper part of the hood back portion.

2. A scarf of the class described, comprising: a fabric body having a corner thereon formed by a pair of converging edges thereof; a first waterproof body, of a size smaller than said fabric body, having a pair of converging edges lying in alignment with said first-named converging edges and secured along said edges to said fabric body; a second waterproof body, of a size smaller than said first waterproof body, overlying said first waterproof body, and having a pair of converging edges in alignment with said first-named converging edges and secured along the edges to said fabric body; a free edge on each of said waterproof bodies; said second waterproof body being foldable about its converging secured edges to form a top portion of a hood, with the back portion of the hood being formed by said fabric body, and with said first waterproof body forming a cover for the upper portion of the hood back portion.

3. The invention as set forth in claim 2, wherein: a snap fastener means is mounted on the free edge of said first waterproof body, and a complementary snap fastener means is mounted on the free edge of said second watel-proof body, whereby said fastener means may be connected for securing said waterproof bodies together when the scarf is not in use as a hood.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,050,310 Steinberg et a1. Jan. 14, 1913 2,574,208 Crowther Nov. 6, 1951 2,600,814 Tomarkin June 17, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,003,368 France Nov. 14, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1050310 *Aug 7, 1911Jan 14, 1913Harris G SteinbergCap.
US2574209 *Mar 17, 1948Nov 6, 1951Gen Motors CorpRod packing for shock absorbers
US2600814 *Dec 24, 1949Jun 17, 1952Wanda TomarkinScarf
FR1003368A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3201803 *Jan 8, 1965Aug 24, 1965Gettinger Lillian LReversible head scarf
US5608914 *Nov 21, 1994Mar 11, 1997Keesler; DarenHeadcover
US20120137407 *Nov 11, 2008Jun 7, 2012Antonio DimuzioScarf
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/207, 2/DIG.200
International ClassificationA42B1/18
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/18, Y10S2/02
European ClassificationA42B1/18