Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2765579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1956
Filing dateJun 3, 1955
Priority dateJun 3, 1955
Publication numberUS 2765579 A, US 2765579A, US-A-2765579, US2765579 A, US2765579A
InventorsGordon Edward
Original AssigneeFlexible Carbon Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insect repellent device
US 2765579 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. GORDON 2,765,579

INSECT REPELLENT DEVICE Filed June 3, 1955 INVENTOR @WMA Qua/0W INSECT REPELLENT DEVICE Edward Gordon, Scranton, PaJ, assignor to Flexible Carbon Products, Inc., Miami, Fla., a corporation of Florida Application June 3, 1955, Serial No. 512,956

12 Claims. (Cl. 43-127) My invention relates broadly to an insect repellent and more particularly to a wick-type fumer for aiding in reducing annoyance from mosquitoes and sandfiies, and otherwise distributing fumes for a variety of purposes.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide a construction of readily merchandiseable package in which a wick-type fumer may be distributed and placed in use upon opening the package for disseminating fumes for repelling insects and aiding in reducing annoyance from mosquitoes and sandfiies.

Another object of my invention is to provide a construction of fumer package comprising a foldable container, unfoldable from a flat packaged position to an open position and having a lining of heat-reflective material adapted to direct fumes from 'a carbonized wick carried by a supporting member within the package.

Another object of my invention is to provide an arrangement for mounting a carbonized wick, saturated with fume-penetrating chemicals, in a fumer package on a support which is automatically elevated when the package is opened to permit the circulation of air through the support and the dissemination of fumes from the carbonized wick.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a structure of carbonized wick braided over a metallic core and which is saturated with fume-generating chemicals comprising active ingredients of pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpentine, thymol, oil of citronella, dirnethyl phtlralate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I), fir needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, pyrethrins; and inert ingredients of carbon, and petroleum distillate.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a package enclosing a support for a carbonized wick consisting of a foraminated screen supported at one edge on a heat-reflecting surface and mounted at the other end on an expansion coil spring adapted to elevate the support when the package is opened for permitting the circulation of air through the screen and the dissemination of fumes from the carbonized wick, while the wick is smoldering.

Other and further objects of my invention reside in the manner of attaching the carbonized wick to a foraminated screen as set forth more "fully in the specification hereinafter following by reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the fumer package of my invention in closed position ready for shipment or distribution as a merchandiseable package;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the fumer package in open position ready for the lighting of the carbonized wick and the dissemination of fumes;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the package showingTthe carbonized wick arranged therein;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through the open packageof Fig. 3, taken on line 4-4 thereof;

Fig. 5 is a cross sectional view through the open package of Fig.3, taken on line 5'-5 thereof;

States Patent 0 Fig. 6 is a plan view of the carbonized Wick mounted in position on a foramin'ated screen, the View being shown on a somewhat enlarged scale;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view through the foraminated screen showing the carbonized wick mounted in position thereon and illustrating the expansion coil spring associated with the screen adjacent one peripheral edge thereof;

Fig. 8 is an elevational view partially in section of a fragmentary portion of the carbonized saturated wick of my invention; and

Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

My invention is directed to a readily merchandiseable fumer package which encloses a carbonized chemicallysaturated wick having a variety of applications, such as a distributor of fumes or smudge, and particularly adapted as a non-toxic repellent for mosquitoes, sandflies, and other insects. The wick constituting my invention is produced from soft cotton yarn which is braided around a soft iron wire core. This braided cotton is normally White. In applications where the product is to be used as a generator of fumes for repelling mosquitoes, ants, and sandfiies, I mount the untreated white braided cotton [cord with the iron wire core therein in a sinuous form on a circular Wire screen of 12 x 12 mesh. The white braided cotton cord is attached to the screen by sewing or stapling and the like. Where the braided cotton is attached by stapling care is taken to attach the staples between the spaced substantially parallel portions of the cotton cord and not across the iron wire core of the cord. Such stapling, transverse of the core, tends to decrease the effective use of the device after treatment and when used as a firmer-generator as hereinafter explained in more detail. The braided cotton cord formed and attached to the wire screen, as explained, is now carbonized by treatment on the rotary hearth of a gas-fired oven. The rotary hearth of the oven is continuously rotated and carries the individual screenssupported cords through a circular path continuously subjected to heat from directions both above and below the rotary hearth at temperatures within the range of 250 to 800 F. The treatment to which the screen-mounted cord is treated is not one of combustion but of carbonization. No combustion is present as the cords are not subjected to the impingement of flames thereon, but are carefully protected from flame by an arrangement of rotary hearth and annular oven disposed above the hearth. Gas burners are arranged beneath the rotary hearth and maintain the rotary hearth at a temperature .suflicient to carbonize the cotton cord.

The cord within the cycle of treatment is modified from its textile condition of white color to a black condition resembling carbon. The carbonized cord is now saturated with oils constituting fume generating chemicals. I have found the following ingredients most effective:

Active: Pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpinetine, thymol, oil of citronella, dimethyl phthalate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I) fir-needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, pyrethrins.

In order to use the device it is simply necessary to open the package whereupon the screen member springs upwardly and a match may be applied to put a fla m'e to the carbonized wick. After a :brief time interv'al the 7 l 3 flame is blown out, whereupon the cord continues to smolder as a wick and generates fumes which I have found to be most effective as a repellent for insects, mosquitoes, ants, and sandflies. The smoldering of the wick may continue for a time interval for as much as four hours. The package is of such convenient size that it may be readily used in a home, on porches, in trailers or automobiles, or house-boats, and in such other areas when camping, hunting, boating, scouting, and in outdoor barbecues, in tents, hotels, motels, and drive-in theaters. When the fume generator is no longer required it may be extinguished by merely closing the package.

Referring to the drawings in more detail, reference character 1 designates a moisture-proof package which is readily die-cut from cardboard or heavy paper and provided with side folds 2 and 3 and end folds 4 and 5. The end fold 4 contains a slot 6 while the opposite end fold has a tongue 7 thereon which coacts with slot 6 and enables the package to be secured in closed position, as in Fig. l, with the fumer device enclosed within the package. The interior surface of the package is covered by heat-reflective metal surface which I have indicated at 8. This surface is formed from a metallic foil such as tin or aluminum foil and serves to direct heat upwardly and outwardly from the package when the fumer is in operation.

A metallic foraminated screen 9 is enclosed by the package for supporting the carbonized wick, shown generally at 11. The screen 9 is generally circular in contour although the screen may be cut into rectangular or square form to fit within the package. The carbonized wick is formed by the braided carbonized material 11 supported over the steel core 10. The braided carbonized material of the wick is saturated with the following ingredients:

Active: Pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpinetine, thymol, oil of citronella, dimethyl phthalate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I) fir-needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, pyrethrins.

The treated carbonized wick 11 supported by the foraminated screen 9 is arranged in a serpentine path as illustrated in Figs. 2, 3 and 6. The wick is stapled to the screen in a very special manner. As shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 6, the wick consists of a number of loops which are substantially sinusoidal and which vary from a maximum amplitude centrally of the supporting member 9 to a minimum amplitude adjacent opposite edges of the supporting member. That is to say, the wick varies from a maximum length adjacent the central part of the screen 9 to minimum lengths at opposite edges of the screen 9. The loops which form the wick have lineal portions which extend on longitudinal axes that are parallel to a medial line between the edges of the supporting screen 9 and the parts of the wick are symmetrical on either side of the said medial line. The ends of the lineal portions of the loops on either side of the central loop are interconnected through curved portions. The wick is secured to the screen 9 by staples 12 which extend transversely across the lineal portions of the wick in spaced positions as shown more clearly in Fig. 5. That is to say, the extreme end loops are fastened to screen 9 by staples 12 adjacent the extreme ends of the wick and a point intermediate the lineal portion of the adjacent turn of the loops. The loops on either side of the central loop are fastened to the screen 9 by staples distributed between the closed ends of the loops and the open ends thereof, as shown. The staples ofier minimum obstruction to the release of fumes and yet maintain the wick on the screen 9 during shipment and use and while the wick is being consumed by smoldering during use of the device.

An expansion coil spring 14 is secured to the underside of one edge of the screen 9. One end of the expansion coil spring 14 rests against the heat-reflecting surface 8 while the other end of the coil spring is attached to the screen 9. The screen 9 may thus be maintained fiat within the package 1 as represented in Fig. 1, with the expansion coil spring 14 in collapsed or compressed position. As soon as the package is opened, as represented in Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5, coil spring 14 expands and elevates screen 9 above the heat-reflecting surface 8 where the opposite edge of the screen 9 serves as a fulcrum about which the screen 9 is raised. Thus there is sufiicient space maintained between heat reflective-surface 8 and the under surface of the wick 11 to insure the circulation of air through the screen and the dissemination of the fumes from the wick when the end of the wick is lighted and blown out.

Generally the package 1 is merchandised within an envelope container and is removed from the envelope container and the package opened. Upon opening of the package, as shown in Fig. 2, spring 14 expands to project the edge of screen 9 upwardly, tilting the screen 9 so that air may readily circulate therethrough as indicated in Fig. 4. The end of the wick 11. is now lighted by a match and the flame then blown out as the wick must smolder, but not flame. The package with the wick 11 in a smoldering state is placed on the floor or ground with the metallic heat-reflective surface 8 directed upwardly. For the best results the repellent is placed in the immediate vicinity of persons or pet animals to be protected, preferably so that vapors will drift over the areas desired to be protected. To extinguish the wick the package is .closed by turning in the side folds 2 and 3 and the end folds 4 and 5, and latching them in position by inserting tongue 7 into slot 6, whereupon the smoldering wick 11 is snuffed out and the smoke disappears.

The package is readily reusable and can be relighted when needed, using the same procedure heretofore described. The wick may be reused until it is entirely consumed by smoldering. Often a single loop remains and yet that remains highly effective for reuse. I have found the device highly satisfactory in repelling mosquitoes and sandflies, and reducing annoyance from these insects. The device is effective both indoors and outdoors. It is particularly suitable when fishing, in outdoor theatres, in backyards, on porches, and in trailers.

While I have described my invention in certain of its preferred embodiments, I realize that modifications may be made and I desire that it be understood that no limitations upon my invention are intended other than may be imposed by the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is as follows:

1. A fumer package comprising a foldable container unfoldable from a flat packed position to an open posi- .tion, a lining of heat-reflective material on the inside of said container, a supporting member mounted in said container, a carbonized wick carried by said supporting member and means for elevating said supporting member 'in an inclined plane above the surface of said heat-reflective lining in said container when said container is in open or unfoldable position.

' 2. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick is fastened to said supporting membet in a serpentine path for combustion in a progressive patllri corresponding to the serpentine formation of the wic 3. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said supporting member is a foraminated screen through which air is circulated for distributing the fumes of combustion from said wick.

4. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick is formed in a serpentine path with portions of the wick extending in spaced lineal positions substantially parallel with each other and interconnected at their ends by transverse curved portions, and staples extending through said supporting member and the portions of said wick disposed in lineal positions.

5. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which the means for elevating said supporting member in an inclined plane above the surface of said heat-reflective lining consists of an expansion coil spring attached to the outer periphery of said supporting member and operative to project one edge of said supporting member upwardly with the opposite edge resting on the surface of said lining of heat reflective material when said package is unfolded to open position.

6. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick is impregnated with 68.55% of pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpentine, thymol, oil of citronella, dimethyl phthalate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I), fir needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, and pyrethrins.

7. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick contains pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpentine, thymol, oil of citronella, dimethyl phthalate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I), fir needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, and pyrethrins.

8. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick consists of 31.45% of carbon petroleum distillate and 68.55% of pine oil, methyl salicylate, oil of eucalyptus, turpentine, thymol, oil of citronella, dimethyl phthalate, camphor, menthol, cedar wood oil, allethrin (allyl homolog of cinerin I), fir needles oil, sassafras oil, anise oil, and pyrethrins.

9. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick is formed by a braided carbonized material supported on a central wire core.

10. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said means for elevating said supporting member is disposed at one peripheral edge of said member and raises said edge when said container is in an open position with the opposite edge resting on said lining of heat-reflective material, and wherein said carbonized wick has lineal portions extending on longitudinal axes that are parallel to a medial line between the aforesaid edges of said supporting member.

11. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick has lineal portions which vary from a maximum length centrally of said supporting member to a minimum length adjacent opposite edges of said supporting member.

12. A fumer package as set forth in claim 1 in which said carbonized wick is symmetrically distributed over said supporting member in loops which are substantially sinusoidal and which may vary from amaximum amplitude centrally of said supporting member to a minimum amplitude adjacent opposite edges of said supporting member.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2836924 *Nov 18, 1955Jun 3, 1958Edward L CopelandInsect retainer and killer
US2940655 *Jul 16, 1957Jun 14, 1960Waldorf Paper Prod CoFolder lock
US3248287 *Aug 17, 1964Apr 26, 1966Sonbert JackDdvp-fortified pyrethrum marc base mosquito repellent smoke coil
US3795999 *Jun 13, 1972Mar 12, 1974Tabita YInsecticidal incense and method for the manufacture thereof
US4042168 *Aug 31, 1976Aug 16, 1977Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPackaging container blank
US4839144 *Aug 6, 1987Jun 13, 1989S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Support device for combustible package containing a heat-dispersible material and a combustible material
US4959925 *Oct 11, 1989Oct 2, 1990S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Apparatus and method for vaporizing active substances
US5657574 *May 13, 1996Aug 19, 1997S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Coiled insect fumigant
US5948424 *May 16, 1997Sep 7, 1999S. C. Johnson & Sons, Inc.Coiled insect fumigant
US5954202 *Mar 4, 1998Sep 21, 1999Westvaco CorporationPaperboard blank for a self-contained, reclosable package
US5961043 *Jun 26, 1998Oct 5, 1999S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Supporting device for dispensing volatile material
US6061950 *Jul 2, 1998May 16, 2000S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Burnable coil holder
US6286248Dec 15, 1999Sep 11, 2001S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Rope-like fumigant
US6389739Jul 19, 2000May 21, 2002S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Adjustable burnable coil container
US6440362Jan 18, 2000Aug 27, 2002S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Interconnectable fumigant
US6732473Jun 27, 2002May 11, 2004S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Burst delivery insect control coil
EP0302471A2 *Aug 3, 1988Feb 8, 1989S.C. JOHNSON & SON, INC.Support device for combustible package
WO1991005467A1 *Sep 19, 1990Apr 12, 1991Johnson & Son Inc S CApparatus and method for vaporizing active substances
Classifications
U.S. Classification43/127, 239/55, 424/40, 229/103.3, D22/122, 422/305
International ClassificationA01M29/12, A01M1/20
Cooperative ClassificationA01M29/12, A01M1/2066, A01M2200/012, A01M1/2088
European ClassificationA01M29/12, A01M1/20C4C, A01M1/20C4R