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Publication numberUS2765688 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1956
Filing dateMar 13, 1953
Priority dateMar 13, 1953
Also published asDE1060949B, DE1087200B, DE1133446B
Publication numberUS 2765688 A, US 2765688A, US-A-2765688, US2765688 A, US2765688A
InventorsEvans William R
Original AssigneeAircraft Marine Prod Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Work locating mechanism for connector crimping tools
US 2765688 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 9. 1956 W. R. EVANS 2,765,68fi

WORK LOCATING MECHANISM FOR CONNECTOR CRIMPING TOOLS Filed March 13, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR flI/AM f f /Ar/vs Oct. 9. 1956 w. R. EVANS 2,765,688

WORK LOCATING MECHANISM FOR CONNECTOR CRIMPING TOOLS Filed March 13, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 T'JE].E.

INVENTOR flzavw A. AVA/vs BY I @214, %M VJ ATTOR Y5.

ct 9, 1956 w. R. EVANS WORK LOCATING MECHANISM FOR CONNECTOR CRIMPING TOOLS 4 Sheets-Sheec 3 Filed March 13, 1955 52 a? Tlqlk INVENTOR.

414404 A? Exam/s.

ATTORN Y6:

Oct. 9. 1956 w. R. EVANS 2,755,588

WORK LOCATING MECHANISM FOR CONNECTOR CRIMPING TOOLS Filed March 1-3, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORNEYS.

WORK LOCATING MECHANISM FOR CONNECTOR l l= PING TOOLS William R. Evans, (Bberlin, Pa., assignor to Aircraft- Marine Products, inc, Harrisburg, Pa.

This invention relates to hand tools for pressure forming electrical connectors about electrical conductors and more particularly to means for properly positioning the connector to be pressure-formed within the tool to insure proper crimping thereof.

Heretofore the making of electrical connections by pressure forming a connector about the wires to be joined to form, in cross section, a substantially solid mass, has been confined to relatively small sized wires. As the art has advanced to the larger, power-size cables, it has become increasingly difiicult to obtain satisfactory connections that will retain the desired electrical and mechanical characteristics for extended periods. It has been found in this regard that the position of the assembled connector and conductor between the dies of the forming tool and the configuration of the die surfaces used, and the relationship between them is of importance. Applicant, according to the present invention has provided a novel mechanism for accurately positioning a connector between the die surfaces and for maintaining it in the desired position, pending and during the pressure forming thereof by a hand tool of the type described.

lt is an object of the present invention to provide a mechanism for properly locating a connector with respect to the pressure forming elements of a crimping tool. It is another object of the present invention to provide a hand tool of the type described having a plurality of locator mechanisms adapted to be selectively positioned to properly orient a plurality of connectors of different sizes and configurations within said hand tool. it is'another object to provide a locator mechanism for a hand tool that is adapted to cooperate with an identifying characteristic of the connector inserted therein to properly orient it for pressure forming. It is another object to provide a hand tool for pressure forming connectors to conductors with locator mechanisms that are easily and quickly moved into and out of position. it is another object to provide a pair of interlocking locator mechanisms such that when one is in position the other is automatically held out of position. it is another object of the present invention to provide a spring-urged locator mechanism which is adapted to contact and maintain a connector between the die surfaces of the tool and to move with the dies during all stages the jaws of the tool;

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary portion of.Figure 2, showing the proper positioning of a connector 22 between the dies of the tool with the jaws partially closed;

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing another type of connector positioned between the jaws of the tool with the corresponding locator mechanism engaged;

Figure 6 is an end view taken on line 66 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 is an exploded view of the locator mechaaccording to the present invention;

Figures 8 and 9 are perspective views of two types of uncrimped connectors, in the crimping of which the present invention is particularly advantageous;

Figure 10 is a fragmentary View similar to Figure 1, of another embodiment of the present invention;

Figure 11 is a fragmentary view similar to Figure 2 of the embodiment of Figure 10;

Figure 12 is a top plan view of the tool of Figure 11 showing a connector and Wire inserted between the jaws of the tool;

Figure 13 is a partial view of the embodiment of Figure 10 showing another type of connector positioned between the jaws of the tool with the jaws partially closed;

Figure 14 is a top plan view of the tool of Figure 13 showing a connector and wire inserted between the dies of the tool;

Figure 15 is a perspective view, on an enlarged scale, of the locator mechanism of Figures 10-14;

Figure 16 is an exploded view of the locator mechanism of the embodiment of Figures 10-15;

Figures 17 through 25 show another embodiment of the present invention in which an automatic latching mechanism associated with the locator mechanism prevents operation of the tool when the connector is improperly positioned between the dies or when a connector of the wrong size or type has been accidentally placed between the dies;

Figure 17 is a side plan view, partially broken away, of the head portion of a hand tool, which is generally similar to that shown in Figure 1, the locator mechanism being adjusted for use with a terminal-type of connector;

Figure 18 is an enlarged partial view of the die surfaces of the tool head of Figure 17 with a terminal-type of connector shown therebetwcen for purposes of explanation;

Figure 19 is a view of the tool head of Figure 17, showing the locator mechanism adjusted for use with another type of connector and with the latching mechanism in position to prevent tool operation because of improper location of the connector between the die surfaces;

Figure 20 is an enlarged partial view of the improperly located connector seen in Figure 19;

Figure 21 is a view of the tool head adjusted as in Figure 19, but showing the latching mechanism in retracted position because the connector is properly positioned between the die surfaces;

Figure 22 is an enlarged partial view of the properly located connector seen in Figure 21;

Figure 23 is a partial sectional View showing the latching mechanism in the same position as in Figure 19;

Figure 24 is a partial end sectional view showing details of construction of the latching mechanism; and

Figure 25 is a partial sectional view showing the latching mechanism retracted and the dies in fully closed crimping position.

Referring now to Figure 1, the hand tool 20 comprises a somewhat C-shaped head portion 22 which has therein a channel 23 for receiving a slide member 24 which carries on its upper end the die surfaces 26 and 28 (see also Figure 3) for crimping the insulation engaging supporting portion and the wire-engaging ferrule portion respectively of the connector to be pressure formed about a conductor. Corresponding dies 30 and 32 are fixed in a slot 33 in the upper portion of the head 22. The slide 24 at its lower end is connected to the pivotally joined upper ends of the handles 34 and 36 which are also pivotally connected through links 38 and 40 to the base portion of the head 22. The slide 24 is thus made to move up and down within the channel 23 as the handles 34 and 36 are opened and closed.

The die 26 is adjustably carried on the slide 24 by means of pin 44 and holes 46a, 46b or 460, to compensate for various thicknesses of wire insulation so that a properly insulated connection will b obtained and the dielectric properties thereof will not be destroyed. In the position shown in Figure 1, the die 26 is positioned for the largest size wire insulation and insulation support, with the upper positions 46b and 46c providing adjustment for smaller sized wire insulations. In operation the handles are spread apart to withdraw the slide 24 downwardly so that the connector to be crimped may be readily inserted between the dies. The handles are then closed forcing the slide 24 upwardly against the inserted connector, with the ratchet mechanism 42 preventing the opening of the handles and the release of the connector until the proper crimping pressure has been applied, as described and claimed in the Carlson Patent No. 2,618,993, issued November 25, 1952.

Referring now to Figure 2, there is shown the other side of the head 22 from that of Figure 1 which carries thereon the locator mechanism 47 according to the present invention. This mechanism comprises a bracket 48 slidably mounted on the head 22 about screws 50 and 52 and carrying thereon a blade portion 54 positioned to project into the space between the C-shaped portions of the head 22 adjacent the dies 28 and 32 and to bridge the gap therebetween. Pivotally mounted about screw 56 on head 22 is a second bracket 58 which carries at its end a locator portion 60 also positioned to project into the space between the C-shaped portions of the head adjacent dies 28 and 32 to bridge the gap therebetween. The brackets 48 and 58 have positioned thereon handles 66 and 64 respectively to facilitate the positioning thereof and bracket 48 carries thereon a stop portion 68 which engages spring 70 which abuts stop 72 on head 22. A cover 74 is provided to maintain the spring between the stops and within the bracket 48.

As shown in Figures 2 and 3, the locator mechanism is positioned to receive a terminal such as 62 in Figure 8. To hold the bracket 48 in its upper location, the bracket 58 is pivoted into the vertical position shown, to cause projection 76 on bracket 58 to engage the finger 78 on bracket 48 (see also Figure 4). By this adjustment, the blade portion 54 of the bracket 58 is withdrawn into a recess 80 in the head 22 so that it will clear a connector positioned between the dies and not interfere with the proper crimping thereof, and the locator portion 60 is positioned adjacent the die'28 so that as the tool is opened to receive a terminal such as 62 it will engage the ferrule forming portion thereof to properly position it between the dies for pressure forming. This may be clearly seen in Figures 3 and 4 wherein it is also seen that the wire inserted within the ferrule of the terminal is advantageously inserted until its tip projects a short distance beyond the end of the ferrule portion and over the portion 60.

In operation the bracket 48 is pushed to itsupper position againstthe action of spring 70 by'the operator, and the bracket 58 pivoted into its vertical position and then the bracket 48 released so that the projection 76 engages the finger 78. The tool is then opened and a terminal inserted until it abuts against the locator portion 60. The tool is then lightly closed to hold the terminal between the die jaws while a wire having theend portion thereof stripped of insulation is inserted into the ferrule of the terminal until it projects a short distancebeyond the end ofthe ferrule portion of the terminal. 'As may be seen in Figure 3, the abutment 60 is made so that it engages only the ferrule forming portion of the terminal. Pressure is then applied to the handles of the tool to crimp the ferrule to the wire, until the ratchet mechanism 42 is tripped to release the terminal and permit its removal.

Referring now to Figures 5 and 6, the brackets 48 and 58 are shown in a position to receive and crimp a connector of the type shown in Figure 9. This type of connector 82 generally has some sort of index portion such as the indentation 84 in the insulating sleeve 85, which is adapted to receive the blade portion 54 of the bracket 48. For this type of connector the bracket 58 is pivoted downwardly out of engagement with the bracket 48 to permit the bracket 48 to be urged downwardly by the spring 70 to contact and position between the dies, a connector such as 82. As may be seen more clearly in Figure 7, the blade portion 54 has its end folded back on itself to form a smoothly curved edg portion which engages the indentation 84 in the sleeve 85 without piercing it or otherwise damaging it. The blade portion 54 being spring-urged into contact with the connector 82, will automatically adjust itself for the various sizes and will also ride upwardly with the connector as the jaws of the tool are closed to first grip the connector and then to pressure form it about the conductor.

In operation the bracket 48 is pushed to its upper position against spring 70 and the connector 82 inserted between the dies mounted in the head 22 and positioned with the indentation 84 approximately in the position shown in Figure 6. Next the bracket 48 is released and the connector 82 adjusted until the blade portion 54 fits snugly in the indentation 84. The connector handles are then lightly closed until the connector 82 is engaged between the dies carried in the head 22 as shown in Figure 6. This permits the end of the conductor or wire to be stripped of insulation and inserted into the connector 82 until the wire end abuts the indentation 84 without having to separately hold or position the connector between the jaws of the tool. The handles of the tool can now be squeezed together until sufficient pressure is applied to crimp the connector and trip the ratchet to permit the release and removal of the connector. The tool is then removed from the connector, rotated 180 and applied to the opposite side of the connector from that of Figure 6, so that the blade portion 54 again engages the indentation 84. Finally the second wire is stripped of insulation adjacent its end and inserted in the uncrimped portion of the connector 82 and the assembled connector and Wire are crimped as described above.

There are thus provided locator mechanisms for properly positioning a terminal or connector within the same tool to insure that the ferrule crimping and insulation 'support crimping dies engage the proper portions of the terminal or connector to produce a proper crimp that will have the desired electrical and mechanical characteristics.

While the invention has been described in the foregoing embodiment as applied to a so-called rectilinear type tool, i. e., one in which the crimping movement of the jaws is substantially linear, the invention is applicable to other types of tools. One such application within the scope of the present invention is shown in Figures 10 through 16 herein.

The hand tool shown in Figure 10 comprises a pair of die-carrying jaws 86 and 88 pivotally mounted on a link 89 at points 90 and 92 respectively and connected at the ends removed from the dies, through pivot points 94 and 96 respectively, to the handles 98 and 100 which are pivotally joined together at 102. In addition the jaws 86 and -88 are provided with adjustable pins 104 and 106 for the adjustment of the insulation dies 108 and 110 similarly to that shown and described in Figure 1.

Figures 11 and 12 show the locator mechanism according to the present invention applied to the tool of Figure and positioned for the reception of a terminal such as 62 of Figure 8. Referring to Figures 11 through 16, this mechanism comprises a bracket 112 mounted on jaw 88 by screw 114. Bracket 112 slidably carries thereon blade portion 116 which carries thereon channel portion 117 and which is normally urged toward the left in Figure 11 by spring 118 which is housed within housing 120 between the stop clip 122 and the end of the channel portion 117 of the blade portion 116. Pin 124 is mounted in block 123 which is carried in an extension 119 of channel 117 and acts as a handle for blade 116. In addition there is pivotally mounted on the bracket 112 a locator portion 126 which is adapted to be pivoted into and out of engagement with the blade portion 116 to form a locator for properly positioning terminals such as 62 between the die jaws. The bracket 112 also carries a pair of upstanding ears 128 and 130 which act as a protector and guide respectively for the locator portion 126.

In operation when it is desired to crimp a terminal such as that in Figure 8, the pin 124 is urged toward the right in Figure 11 to move the blade portion 116 clear of the die area and the locator 126 is pivoted clockwise to a position adjacent the jaw 86 and the pin 124 is then released so that the finger portion 132 of the blade will engage and overlie the locator 126 as shown in Figure 12. Next the terminal to be crimped is inserted from the side of the tool shown in Figure 10 until the ferrule portion thereof engages the locator 126. The jaws are then closed lightly to hold the terminal in the position shown in Figure 12, and a wire with the insulation stripped from the end portion thereof is inserted into the ferrule portion of the terminal until it protrudes a small distance beyond the end of the ferrule and over the locator 126. The jaws may then be tightly closed and a ratchet mechanism similar to that of Figure 1 insures that sufficient pressure will be applied to crimp the assembled connector and wire before it can be released from the tool.

In Figures 13 and 14 the locator 126 is pivoted counterclockwise until it engages upstanding ear 128 which supports it in position out of the way of the blade portion 115 and protects it against damage by bending, etc. The blade 116 now under the influence of spring 118 will move toward the left in Figure 13 into the space between the jaws 86 and 88.

In operation, pin 124 is moved to the right in Figure 13 to withdraw the blade portion 116 from between the die jaws and a connector such as 82 of Figure 9 is inserted and pin 124 released so that the finger portion 132 of the blade 116 engages the indentation 84 of the connector 32 to position the connector as shown in Figure 14. A wire having the insulation stripped from the end thereof is then inserted and the connector is crimped thereon as described in connection with Figures 11 and 12. The tool is next rotated 180 and the assembled connector and wire inserted in the tool and the locating and crimping process repeated to connect a second Wire thereto.

Referring now to Figures 17 through 25, there is shown a further embodiment of the present invention wherein the locator mechanism cooperates with a latching mechanism to prevent the operation of the tool unless the connector to be crimped is properly positioned therein. As may be seen in Figures 23 and 24, latching mechanism 134 comprises a pawl 136 pivotally mounted about pin 13% in a recess 14% in the head 22 of the tool which may be of generally the same configuration as the tool of Figures 1 through 7. Pawl 136 is urged outwardly from the recess 144') by spring 142 so as to lie in the path of the lower die 23 and prevent its being moved into contact with the opposed upper die 32 to crimp a connector therebetween. Pawl 135 also carries thereon a pin 144 which extends laterally therefrom, as shown in Figure 24,

to engage the slider bracket 48' mounted on the side of head 22 similarly to bracket 48 in the embodiment of Figures 1 through 7. Bracket 48 has therein a camming slot 146 which may be seen in Figures 17, 19, and 21. Camming slot 146 has at each end thereof an inclined surface adapted to move pin 144 inwardly in recess to retract the pawl 136 to the position shown in Figures 17, 21 and 25. Thus when the slider bracket 48 is in its upper or lower positions (Figures 17 or 21 respectively) the pawl 136 is withdrawn out of the path of the die 23 so that the tool may be operated in the normal manner to crimp a connector or terminal to a conductor.

In operation if a connector such as 82 of Figure 9 is inserted into the tool to a position shown in Figures 19 and 20, slider bracket 48 will be held in its approximate midposition by finger 54' so that the pin 144 can move outwardly of recess 140 to contact the surface 148 of camming slot 146 to the position shown in Figure 19. In this position the pawl 136 extends into the path of the lower die 28' and prevents the operation of the tool, which, if not prevented, would produce a defective connection.

When the connector is properly positioned within the tool the locator finger 54 of the slider bracket 48' will project into the recess 84 of the connector 82 causing the upper camming surface of the slider bracket 48' to move the pin 144 to the right, to the position of Figure 21 which will withdraw the pawl 136 and permit actuation of the toolto crimp the connector as shown in Figure 25.

When the handles are in the full open position the ratchet mechanism is disengaged to permit adjustment of the dies, so that if the connector is improperly positioned the tool may be opened and the connector repositioned or the proper connector obtained as the case may be without having to waste a connector by crimping it improperly to get the tool open again.

The tool is thus latched against operation when a connector is positioned therein in sch a way that a defective connection would be formed or when a connector of the wrong size or shape is positioned therein.

As shown in Figure 17, when it is desired to use the tool to pressure form a ring tongue terminal about a conductor the slider bracket 48 is moved upwardly as in Figure 2, and the locator stop 58' is pivoted upwardly to engage the finger 78' on slider bracket 48'. In this position the slider bracket 48 is held in its upper position so that cam surface 150 moves the pin 144 to the right to withdraw the pawl 136 from the path of the lower die 28'. In this case the proper position of the terminal against the locator stop 58' must be visually ascertained before the tool is operated to prevent defective connections as with the embodiments of Figures 1 through 16.

While there are given above certain specific examples of this invention and its application in practical use and also certain modifications and alternatives, it should be understood that these are not intended to be exhaustive or to be limiting of the invention. On the contrary, these illustrations and the explanations herein are given in order to acquaint others skilled in the art with this invention and the principles thereof and a suitable manner of its application in practical use, so that others skilled in the art may be enabled to modify the invention and to adapt it and apply it in numerous forms, each as may be best suited to the requirement of a particular use.

I claim:

1. For pressure forming electrical connectors about an electrical conductor, a hand tool of the type having a pair of opposed jaw members carrying thereon at least one pair of die surfaces, a pair of elongated handles, and levers linking said jaws and handles to operate said jaws. in accordance with the movement of said handles comprising in combination a generally C-shaped head portion, a longitudinal channel in the top and bottom of said 0 shaped head, a first pair of dies fixed in said top channel,.

a second pair of corresponding dies slidably mounted in said bottom channel spaced from said first pair of dies, and a terminal locator slidably mounted on said head comprising a blade portion adjacent one edge of one of said die pairs, a mounting bracket for said blade portion having a spring engaging portion and a spring positioned between said bracket and head tending to resiliently urge said blade into the space adjacent the space between said dies whereby a connector having an orienting index therein may be properly positioned and held between said die pairs by engaging said blade in said index.

2. The device as described in claim 1 including a locking means pivotally mounted adjacent said bracket to selectively engage said bracket in one position to hold said blade portion clear of the space adjacent the opposed die surfaces.

3. In a hand tool of the type adapted to pressure form a connector about a conductor, the combination of at least one pair of opposed die surfaces, lever means for forcefully moving said dies together about a connector and wire, latching means for preventing operation of said tool, and latch actuating means positioned to contact a connector placed between said die surfaces to disable said latching means only when the connector is properly oriented between said die surfaces, wherein said latching means comprises a pivotally mounted pawl, spring-urged into the path of said die surfaces and a cam member mounted thereon and wherein said latch-actuating means comprises a movably mounted cam surface adapted to contact said cam member and a connector-contacting finger portion mounted on said latch actuating means to position said latch actuating means according to the contour of the connector contacted, whereby when a connector of proper configuration, positioned between said die surfaces is properly oriented, said tool may be actuated.

4. For pressure forming electrical connectors about an electrical conductor, a hand tool of the type having a pair of opposed jaw members carrying thereon at least one pair of die surfaces, a pair of elongated handles, and levers linking said jaws and handles to operate said jaws in accordance with the movement of said handles comprising in combination a generally C-shaped head portion, a longitudinal channel in the top and bottom of said 0- shaped head, a first pair of dies fixed in said top channel, a second pair of corresponding dies slidably mounted in said bottom channel spaced from said first pair of dies, and a connector locator slidably mounted on said head comprising a blade portion adjacent one edge of one of said die pairs, a mounting bracket for said blade portion having a spring engaging portion, a spring positioned between said bracket and head tending to resiliently urge said blade into the space adjacent the space between said dies and a locking means pivotally mounted below the second of said die pairs and turnable to have a portion extend above said second of said die pairs in said bottom channel and engage with said bracket to hold said blade portion clear of the space adjacent the opposed die surfaces.

Rcferences Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 499,765 Upton June 20, 1893 584,591 Johnson June 15, 1897 1,552,722 Melton Sept. 8, 1925 2,086,400 Brenizer July 6, 1937 2,329,385 Bratz Sept. 14, 1943 2,359,083 Carlson Sept. 26, 1944 2,411,838 Swengel Nov. 26, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS 163,115 Germany Oct. 7, 1905

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2829549 *Jul 9, 1956Apr 8, 1958Amp IncWork locating and holding means for a plier type crimping tool
US2914976 *Mar 22, 1957Dec 1, 1959Amp IncCrimping tool with double-ended floating die member
US2928299 *Jan 8, 1958Mar 15, 1960Amp IncMulti-action crimping tool
US2953185 *Sep 13, 1957Sep 20, 1960Burndy CorpTerminal and cable stop
US2992576 *Nov 19, 1957Jul 18, 1961Amp IncHand crimping tool
US3030838 *Feb 24, 1955Apr 24, 1962Amp IncHydraulic pump-up tool
US3084575 *Oct 19, 1960Apr 9, 1963Nat Telephone Supply CoCompression tool
US3094702 *Mar 27, 1961Jun 25, 1963Buchanan Electrical Prod CorpCrimping tool
US3118486 *Apr 7, 1960Jan 21, 1964Burndy CorpConnector locating means
US3177693 *Nov 24, 1961Apr 13, 1965Thomas & Betts Co IncCrimping tool
US3191464 *Oct 23, 1963Jun 29, 1965Amp IncAdjustable wire stripping device
US3315337 *Jun 28, 1965Apr 25, 1967Amp IncCrimping tool with retainer-ejector
US3732718 *Apr 1, 1971May 15, 1973Kings Electronics Co IncCable crimping die tool
US4590786 *Apr 11, 1984May 27, 1986C. A. Weidmuller Gmbh & Co.Cable shoe tongs with a stop means
US4736614 *Apr 24, 1986Apr 12, 1988Thomas & Betts CorporationConnector support for crimping tool
US6427565Nov 14, 2000Aug 6, 2002Great Neck Saw Manufacturers, Inc.Parallel grip plier
US7228624 *Apr 1, 2005Jun 12, 2007Alfred E. Mann Foundation For Scientific ResearchMethods for connecting wires
US7444851 *Jul 10, 2006Nov 4, 2008Janson Paul MHand tool providing double compound leverage to the jaws
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DE1093847B *Apr 30, 1957Dec 1, 1960Wieland Elek Sche Ind G M B HZangenfoermiges Handwerkzeug zum Befestigen eines elektrischen Huelsenverbinders auf einem Leiter
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DE1101557B *Jun 25, 1959Mar 9, 1961Alois Schiffmann Dipl KfmKerbwerkzeug
DE1136391B *Nov 9, 1959Sep 13, 1962Buchanan Electrical Prod CorpWerkzeug zum Kerben und Pressen elektrischer Klemmhuelsen
DE10134004C1 *Jul 12, 2001Feb 6, 2003Rennsteig Werkzeuge GmbhLocator for crimping tools has a nipping head with two jaw pieces moving together and away from each other and each supporting a crimping section.
EP0218376A2 *Sep 9, 1986Apr 15, 1987THOMAS & BETTS CORPORATION (a New Jersey Corporation)Connector support for crimping tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/404, 81/341, 81/362, 72/409.14, 81/350
International ClassificationH01R43/042, H01R43/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/042
European ClassificationH01R43/042