Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2766907 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1956
Filing dateMar 15, 1955
Priority dateMar 15, 1955
Publication numberUS 2766907 A, US 2766907A, US-A-2766907, US2766907 A, US2766907A
InventorsJr James M Wallace
Original AssigneeRobbins Instr Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure infusion apparatus
US 2766907 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 16, 1956 J. M. WALLACE, JR 2,766,907

PRESSURE INFUSION APPARATUS .Filed March 15, 1955 IN V EN TOR.

JAMES M. WALLACE, JR.

United States PatentO PRESSURE INFUSION APPARATUS James M. Wallace, Jr., Attleboro, Mass., assignor to Robbins Instrument Corporation, Attieboro, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts Application March 15, 1955", Serial No. 494,513

5 Claims. (Cl. 222-94) This invention relates to apparatus for the pressure infusion of liquids and pertains more specifically to apparatus for intravenous injection of solutions under controlled pressure.

Liquids for intravenous injection, such as whole blood, plasma, etc., are conventionally supplied in disposable, sterile, sealed bags or receptacles of transparent, flexible, plastic material having an outlet or delivery tube adapted to be punctured by the coupler of a recipient set. In use, the container is suspended above the patient and the liquid is permitted to flow by gravity into the vein or artery. However, this arrangement is slow, particularly when the container is almost empty, and it is particularly unsatisfactory in cases of severe hemorrhage or shock.

One object of the present invention is to provide an inexpensive device, simple in construction, for applying pressure to such a receptacle filled with liquid for forcing the liquid therefrom.

Another object is to provide apparatus for the pressure infusion of liquids which is light in Weight, readily portable, and flexible, so that it can be rolled up or folded on itself for convenient storage when not in use.

Still another object is to provide apparatus for the pressure infusion of liquid which is readily applied to a disposable, sterile, sealed, plastic receptacle filled with liquid to be infused, without coming in contact with the liquid itself, and of such a nature that it can be readily cleaned.

A further object is to provide apparatus for maintaining a controlled air pressure upon a liquid during infusion thereof without any risk of causing embolism.

Other and further objects will be apparent from the drawings and from the description which follows.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a view in front elevation of one embodiment of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a view in rear elevation; and

Fig. 3 is a view in vertical section taken along the line 33 of Fig. 1.

As shown in the drawings, the device comprises an outer container or bag having an open bottom end. Container 19 may conveniently take the form of an elongated envelope having flexible, substantially inextensible walls, as for example an envelope made of textile fabric, or preferably textile fabric which has been coated or impregnated with a liquid-impervious natural or synthetic rubber or resin composition. As shown in Fig. 2, one wall of the envelope 10 may be in the form of a flexible, transparent, substantially inextensible sheet 12 of plastic material such as plasticized vinyl resin to permit observation of the interior of the envelope during use. A handle 14 may be provided for use in suspending the apparatus from any suitable support 16.

Container 16 is of such a size that it contains a standard flexible, collapsible receptacle or bag 18 (Fig. 3) filled with the liquid to be infused, receptacle 18 being engaged snugly within envelope 10. Receptacle 18 is provided with the usual outlet 20, which may be sealed at its lower end until ready for use, as is well known in the art. The

apparatus additionally comprises an expansible bladder 22 having walls of elastic rubbery material and normally having a flattened configuration, and which is of approximately the same length and Width as the interior of envelope 10, so as to be substantially co-extensive with one wall of envelope 10. Bladder 22 is provided with two connecting tubes 24, 26, which pass through suitable apertures in the wall of envelope 10. These tubes serve not only the function of permitting inflation and deflation of bladder 22, but in addition assist in maintaining the bladder in position within envelope 10. A flexible, substantially inextensible flap 28, which may conveniently be made of the same material as the wall of envelope 10, such as textile fabric or rubberized textile fabric, and indeed may be integral therewith, extends from the wall of the envelope adjacent bladder 22 and is adapted to be inserted into envelope 10 toward its closed end with the bladder disposed between the flap 28 and one wall of envelope 10. The flap 28 preferably is of approximately the same width as the interior of the envelope or container, and should be at least half as long in order to perform its function satisfactorily. In the embodiment shown in the drawing, flap 28 is substantially of the same length as envelope 10. The face of flap 28 which is adjacent to receptacle 18 may be of a color which contrasts with the color of the liquid contained in the receptacle.

A supporting strap 30 is secured to the exterior of envelope in adjacent the connecting tube 24 for supporting a pressure gauge 32 of any conventional design, which may be connected to bladder 22 by means of tube 24. Any suitable source of gas pressure may be connected to bladder 22 through the second tube 26. The source of pressure may comprise simply a conventional squeeze bulb for manual operation, or any suitable source of gas at constant or controlled pressure may be provided if desired.

In order to retain receptacle 1% within envelope 10 prior to inflation of bladder 22, a cinching means is provided in the form of two straps 34, 36 secured to the outside of envelope 10 at opposite edges thereof and provided with connecting means such as buckles 33 at their opposing ends. Straps 34, 36 together with connecting buckle 38 have a total length somewhat less than the width of envelope 1%, so that when the buckle is fastened the envelope is cinched or constricted closely about receptacle 18 near its lower end. Straps 34, 36 are preferably elastic so as to permit some variation in the size of receptacle 18. These straps are preferably located near the lower or open end of envelope it but above the lower end of receptacle 18, so as to avoid constricting or cocking outlet tube 20.

In use, envelope 10, containing bladder 22 held in place by means of flap 23 extending inwardly toward the closed end of the envelope, as shown in Fig, 3, is slipped over liquid-filled receptacle 18, and buckle 38 is fastened to constrict the open end of the envelope about receptacle 18. The assemblage is then hung upon any suitable support, the sealed end of outlet tube 29 is punctured by means of the coupler of the recipient set, which is then connected to the vein or artery of the patient, and the desired pressure is supplied through tube 26 to inflate the expansible elastic bladder 22 so as to exert the desired pressure upon receptacle 18, as indicated by gauge 32. As the liquid flows from receptacle 18, it collapses first at its upper end, permitting the entire liquid contents to flow freely through outlet tube 20 until the receptacle is empty. Observation of the amount of liquid remaining in the receptacle may be made at any time through the transparent plastic window 12 since the liquid level is readily apparent against the contrasting background color of flap 28. Since the pressure in bladder 22 preferably remains constant throughout discharge of the liquid,

the bladder will expand in size as'the liquid drains from receptacle 18. Flap 28, being secured to the envelope 10 only at its lower end, slides over the face of bladder 22 adjacent its upper end, thus permitting gradual expansion of the bladder downwardly from its upper end while at the'sametime releasably securing the bladder in place within the envelope. Because of the construction of the apparatus, it is impossible to produce an embolism, the pressure upon the liquid in receptacle 18 ceasing as soon as the receptacle is empty/ 1 In another embodiment of the invention, receptacle 1% may be filled with a fluid such as air or other gas and outlet tube 29 may be connected to the interior of a rigidwalled container filled with the blood or other liquid to be infused The device thus arranged produces a pressure on the surface of the liquid, forcing it into the vein or artery of the patient. By choosing a receptacle 18 with a volume less than the volume of liquid to be infused, the possibility of forcing any air bubbles into the vein or artery is completely avoided, while at the same time a controlled pressure, preferably a constant'pressure, is

' applied to the liquid being infused.

After use of the device, it may readily be removed from receptacle 18 simply by deflating bladder 22 and I stantially inextensible material adapted to contain an inner flexible, collapsible receptacle filled with liquid to" be infused, an expansible bladder disposed within said container adjacentone wall thereof adapted to be in fiated to press against said receptacle inlsaid container to force liquid therefrom, means for releasably securing said bladder in place within said container, and means comprising a cinching strap for restricting said container adjacent its open end for releasably retaining said receptacle in place in said container. r

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 in which the means for releasably retaining said receptacle in place comprises a cinching strap secured to the outer face of said container adjacent its open end adapted to constrict said container.

3. Apparatus for pressure infusion of liquids cornprising an open-ended container having walls of flexible, substantially inextensible material adapted to contain an inner flexible, collapsible receptacle'filled with liquid to be infused, an elastic expansible bladder disposed within said container extending adjacent one wall substantially the full length thereof and adapted to be inflated to press against said receptacle in said container to force liquid therefrom, and means for releasably securing said bladder in place within said container including a flexible, substantially inextensible flap extending from the openend of said Wall adjacent said bladder movable to' and from a position in which it' extends within said container toward the closed end thereof with said bladder disposed between said wall and said flap.

Apparatus as defined in claim 3 in which said container is in the form of a normally flat, elongatedenvelope open at one end, said bladder is normally flat and of approximately the same length and width as the inside of said envelope, and said flap is approximately of the same width as said envelope and at least one-half as long as said envelope.

5. Apparatus for pressure infusion of liquids comprising a normally flat, elongated envelope open at 'one end and having walls of flexible, substantially inextensible material and adapted to contain an inner flexible, collapsible receptacle filled with liquid to be infused, a normally flat, elastic expansible bladder of approximately the same length and width as the inside of said envelope disposed therewithin' adjacent one wall thereof and adapted to be inflated to press against said receptacle in said envelope: to force liquid therefrom, means for releasably securing said bladder in place within said 'en velope comprising a flexible, substantially inextensible flap of approximately the same width and at least half as 7 it extendswithin said envelope toward theclosed end thereof with said bladder disposed between said flap and the Wall of the envelope from which the flap extends, and

cinching means for releasably retaining said receptacle in' place in said envelope comprising strap and buckle means secured to the exterior of said envelope adjacent opposite edges thereof and adjacent said open end adapted to constrict said envelope adjacent said open end.

Mercier Oct. 23, 1945 A V Scaby et al May 6, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2387598 *Mar 17, 1942Oct 23, 1945Mercier JeanOleopneumatic storage device
US2595493 *Sep 9, 1949May 6, 1952Le Roy K MillsLiquid extracting apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2831610 *Sep 13, 1956Apr 22, 1958Chase Bag CompanyLiquid dispensing container
US2842123 *May 25, 1956Jul 8, 1958Le Roy M RundhaugPressurized transfusion apparatus
US2978144 *Mar 15, 1957Apr 4, 1961Roto Werke AgSelf-emptying pressure vessels
US3052380 *Jun 3, 1960Sep 4, 1962Theodorus PrinsDevice for storing liquids, more particularly oil
US3054401 *Dec 23, 1959Sep 18, 1962American Sterilizer CoTransfusion set
US3074402 *Jan 4, 1960Jan 22, 1963Baxter Laboratories IncBlood handling equipment
US3081002 *Aug 13, 1958Mar 12, 1963Pfrimmer & Co JContainers for medicinal liquids
US3153414 *Feb 2, 1962Oct 20, 1964Abbott LabApparatus for the induced infusion of liquid from a flexible liquid container
US3155280 *Sep 29, 1961Nov 3, 1964Quase Harold GBuoyant flexible container and underwater anchorage therefor
US3228395 *Nov 10, 1961Jan 11, 1966Mcgaw Lab IncBlood bag transfusion unit with pressure chamber
US3263848 *Dec 3, 1963Aug 2, 1966Johnson & JohnsonNursing container with supporting handles
US3294289 *Jan 27, 1965Dec 27, 1966Schlitz Brewing Co JDispensing unit
US3298610 *Jan 25, 1965Jan 17, 1967Jidosha Denki Kogyo KkCleaning apparatus for the front windshield glass of motor cars
US3319837 *Jan 27, 1965May 16, 1967Air Ject CorpDispensing device
US3520471 *Oct 9, 1968Jul 14, 1970Union Carbide CorpFlexible plastic container
US3640276 *Jan 9, 1970Feb 8, 1972Allis Chalmers Mfg CoApparatus for making intravenous or intra-arterial injections
US3640277 *Dec 9, 1968Feb 8, 1972Marvin AdelbergMedical liquid administration device
US3734351 *Jul 26, 1971May 22, 1973LabazPress for a deformable bag
US3850348 *Feb 9, 1973Nov 26, 1974AnvarApparatus for injection of liquid
US3895741 *Sep 27, 1972Jul 22, 1975Bestnu Engineering PtyIntravenous fluids administration apparatus
US4014329 *Jul 3, 1975Mar 29, 1977The Rochester General HospitalMethod and apparatus for autotransfusion of blood
US4043332 *May 14, 1975Aug 23, 1977Nathan BlumbergConstant flow rate liquid medicament administering device
US4090514 *Oct 22, 1976May 23, 1978Howard Helmut HinckPressure infusion device
US4193398 *May 25, 1978Mar 18, 1980Watson-Marlow LimitedFluid displacement
US4270533 *Aug 16, 1977Jun 2, 1981Andreas Joseph MMultiple chamber container for delivering liquid under pressure
US4379453 *Sep 15, 1980Apr 12, 1983Baron Howard CInfusion system with self-generating pressure assembly
US4551136 *Apr 11, 1983Nov 5, 1985Medex, Inc.Pressure infusor
US4576603 *Jun 18, 1984Mar 18, 1986Gerald MossFeeding device for enterally administering liquids into a human body
US4655742 *Jul 16, 1984Apr 7, 1987Rhone-Poulenc S.A.Process/apparatus for the withdrawal/return of body fluids
US4687423 *Jun 7, 1985Aug 18, 1987Ivac CorporationElectrochemically-driven pulsatile drug dispenser
US5053011 *Sep 29, 1989Oct 1, 1991Harmac Medical Products, Inc.Disposable pressure infusion system
US5053012 *Sep 29, 1989Oct 1, 1991Harmac Medical Products, Inc.Disposable pressure cuff having flow-through pressure gauge
US5059182 *May 16, 1989Oct 22, 1991David H. LaingPortable infusion device
US5090963 *Oct 19, 1990Feb 25, 1992Product Development (Z.G.S.) Ltd.Electrochemically driven metering medicament dispenser
US5199611 *Oct 8, 1991Apr 6, 1993Valco Cincinnati, Inc.Apparatus for squeezing material from collapsible tubes
US5217144 *Nov 5, 1991Jun 8, 1993Valco Cincinnati, Inc.Apparatus for squeezing material from collapsible tubes
US5318556 *Apr 9, 1993Jun 7, 1994Deknatel Technology CorporationFluid bag
US5368569 *Aug 18, 1993Nov 29, 1994Sanese Medical CorporationIrrigation system for preventing contamination and reducing the risk of patient hypothermia
US5656033 *Jun 30, 1995Aug 12, 1997Atkinson; Carey JoeMethod of construction of a system for delivery of intravenous fluids and the like
US5738657 *Dec 19, 1996Apr 14, 1998Abbott LaboratoriesAmbulatory energized container system
US6135989 *May 13, 1998Oct 24, 2000Atad; JackPressurized intravenous infusion bag
US6210391Aug 10, 1999Apr 3, 2001Genzyme CorporationRapid transfer autotransfusion bag and methods related thereto
US6364864 *Jun 3, 1999Apr 2, 2002Baxter International Inc.Plastic containers having inner pouches and methods for making such containers
US6435307Jul 8, 1999Aug 20, 2002Theodore W. SelbyPrecise replacement of liquids and components in a liquid mixture
US6467953Mar 30, 2000Oct 22, 2002Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring temperature of intravenously delivered fluids and other medical items
US6566631Oct 23, 2001May 20, 2003Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring temperature of intravenously delivered fluids and other medical items
US6722782Oct 23, 2001Apr 20, 2004Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring temperature of intravenously delivered fluids and other medical items
US6824528Mar 3, 1998Nov 30, 2004Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for pressure infusion and temperature control of infused liquids
US6868851 *Jan 31, 2002Mar 22, 2005Instrumentarium Corp.Liquid reservoir for nebulizer
US6921385Aug 5, 2002Jul 26, 2005Alcon, Inc.Apparatus for delivery of fluid to opthalmic surgical handpiece
US7041941Mar 22, 2004May 9, 2006Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMedical item thermal treatment systems and method of monitoring medical items for compliance with prescribed requirements
US7090658Oct 11, 2001Aug 15, 2006Medical Solutions, Inc.Temperature sensing device for selectively measuring temperature at desired locations along an intravenous fluid line
US7160268Aug 5, 2002Jan 9, 2007Alcon, Inc.Container for delivery of fluid to ophthalmic surgical handpiece
US7276675Aug 8, 2006Oct 2, 2007Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMedical item thermal treatment systems and method of monitoring medical items for compliance with prescribed requirements
US7307245Jul 21, 2006Dec 11, 2007Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMedical item thermal treatment systems and method of monitoring medical items for compliance with prescribed requirements
US7417205Jan 17, 2006Aug 26, 2008Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMedical item thermal treatment systems and method of monitoring medical items for compliance with prescribed requirements
US7540864May 20, 2004Jun 2, 2009Medical Solutions, Inc.Temperature sensing device for selectively measuring temperature at desired locations along an intravenous fluid line
US7611504Mar 9, 2004Nov 3, 2009Patented Medical Solutions LlcMethod and apparatus for facilitating injection of medication into an intravenous fluid line while maintaining sterility of infused fluids
US7740611Oct 17, 2006Jun 22, 2010Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMethod and apparatus to indicate prior use of a medical item
US7762982Dec 27, 2004Jul 27, 2010Darshan ShahBreast implant fill device
US7942851Aug 9, 2004May 17, 2011Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for pressure infusion and temperature control of infused liquids
US8157782 *Aug 27, 2010Apr 17, 2012Skedco, Inc.IV infusion carrier pack
US8226293Feb 22, 2007Jul 24, 2012Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for measurement and control of temperature for infused liquids
US8226605Dec 17, 2001Jul 24, 2012Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for heating solutions within intravenous lines to desired temperatures during infusion
US8313462Jan 7, 2010Nov 20, 2012Medical Solutions, Inc.Method and apparatus for pressure infusion and temperature control of infused liquids
US8444599May 10, 2010May 21, 2013Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMethod and apparatus to indicate prior use of a medical item
US8636691May 10, 2010Jan 28, 2014Patented Medical Solutions, LlcMethod and apparatus to indicate prior use of a medical item
US20100324532 *Aug 27, 2010Dec 23, 2010Skedco, Inc.Iv infusion carrier pack
US20120267275 *Apr 22, 2011Oct 25, 2012Gilmore Dovie DCases for concealing alternative nutrition and/or intravenous bags hanging from an IV stand pole
EP0077189A1 *Oct 8, 1982Apr 20, 1983Biofusion (Proprietary) LimitedAn infusion unit
EP0102012A1 *Aug 12, 1983Mar 7, 1984Saul LeibinsohnInflatable bag-presser unit for infusion bags
EP0132210A1 *Jul 5, 1984Jan 23, 1985Rhone-Poulenc S.A.Apparatus for plasmapheresis
EP0265261A2 *Oct 22, 1987Apr 27, 1988Biomedical Dynamics CorporationPressure infusion device
EP1584341A1 *Apr 5, 2005Oct 12, 2005Sidam di Azzolini Graziano E C. S.a.s.Kit for injecting thermally-conditioned fluids, particularly for first-aid actions
WO1994023664A1 *Apr 8, 1994Oct 27, 1994Deknatel Tech CorpFluid bag
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/94, 604/141, 239/373, 222/95, 222/386.5, 128/DIG.120, 239/327, 239/328, 222/107, 604/410
International ClassificationA61M5/148, A61J1/00, A61J1/05
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/12, A61M5/1483, A61J1/10
European ClassificationA61J1/10