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Publication numberUS2766987 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1956
Filing dateMar 31, 1955
Priority dateMar 31, 1955
Publication numberUS 2766987 A, US 2766987A, US-A-2766987, US2766987 A, US2766987A
InventorsCoralie Knepshield, Seelbrede Herbert B
Original AssigneeCoralie Knepshield, Seelbrede Herbert B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board and pieces
US 2766987 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1956 H. B. SEELBREDE ET AL 2,765,937

GAME BOARD AND PIECES 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed march 51, 1955 Octwiiklfi, 1956 H. B. SEELBREDE ET AL 9 3 GAME BOARD AND PIECES Filed March 31, 1955' 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TORS AT ORNEY United States Patent GAME BOARD AND PIECES Herbert B. Seelbrede, Greenville, and Coralie Knepshield, West Middletown, Ohio Application March 31, 1955", Serial No. 498,321

3 Claims. (Cl. 273-1359 Our invention relates to amusement devices and games and particularly to a game board and related game pieces for use in determining the progress, duration and scoring of a word-spelling alphabet game.

Our invention has for one of its objects to provide a game board having a square flat playing surface providing player stations along each edge and, individual to each station, a field of play consisting of a plurality of square areas in close adjoining pyramidal relation having its base along the playing surface edge and projecting inwardly therefrom toward an apex near the center of the playing surface, said field of play forming square areas in front of each player station being of a single color different from the color of the square areas forming the field of play in front of any other player station.

Another object of our invention is to provide a plurality of peg game pieces and a game board of the character described having a hole at each of the vertices of each square area on the playing surface thereof, each hole being adapted to receive one of said peg game pieces. A

further object of our invention is to provide four pluralities of peg game pieces, each plurality of peg game pieces being of one color like the color of one of said fields of play and difierent in color from those of the other pluralities 'of peg game pieces and other of said fields of play, said peg game pieces adapted for insertion in the holes at the vertices of square areas forming the playing fields on the playing surface.

A still further object of the invention is to provide another plurality of peg game pieces being in cross section of an incongruous shape and dimension to the shape and dimension of certain of the heretofore mentioned game board holes and congruous to the remaining of said heretofore mentioned game board holes.

A still further object is to provide a plurality of card game pieces usable in conjunction with the game board and peg game pieces heretofore mentioned.

A general object of our invention is to provide the elements of an interesting table game involving the skill of the players to spell and to foresee placement combinations. In that sense, the game possesses some of the charms of the educational spelling games and those of checker-chess games.

The invention has for objects to provide other advantageous structures and arrangements which will appear from the following description and an examination of the accompanying drawings. Structures containing our invention may take various forms and the form shown in the accompanying drawing and described hereinafter is the one which we select to illustrate an embodiment of our invention because it now appears to us as the best mode in which our invention may be carried out. Reference to the accompanying drawings is had to facilitate our description. We do not imply in making this description or reference to the accompanying drawings, however, that variations therefrom embodying our invention made manifest herein are beyond the contemplation of our invention.

Figure 1 of the accompanying drawings is a plan view of a game embodying features of my invention. Figure 2 of such drawings illustrates perspective views of specimens of each plurality of the mentioned peg game pieces used in conjunction with the game board shown in Figure 1; Figure 3 illustrates an enlarged view of a section taken along the plane of the line 33 indicated in Figure 1. Figure 4 illustrates a view of a section taken along the plane of the line 4-4 indicated in Figure 3. Figure 5 illustrates a view of a cross section taken along the plane of the line 5-5 indicated in Figure 2. Figure 6 illustrates an enlarged view of a section taken along the plane of the line 6-6 indicated in Figure 1. Figure 7 illustrates a view of a cross section taken along the plane of the line 7--7 indicated in Figure 6. Figure 8 illustrates a view of a cross section taken along the plane of the line 8-8 indicated in Figure 2. Figure 9 illustrates a specimen of each plurality of card game pieces used in conjunction with the game board and peg game pieces shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 10 illustrates a specimen of other pluralities of card game pieces supplementing those shown in Figure 9.

A game board embodying the features of my invention is indicated generally, in the accompanying drawings, by the reference character 2i). The game board 20 may be formed from wood, plastic, or any other suitable material which will provide, at reasonable cost, a smooth flat square playing surface 21 on its upper side. The board 29 may be, as shown in the drawings, of circular outline in which the playing surface 21 is within a marginal area 22 of convenience to the playing and players as will later appear.

Within the playing surface 21, there are a plurality of parallel line scores 25 which extend across the playing surface 21 in parallel and inwardly spaced relation to the two opposite perimeters 30 and 32 of the playing surface 21. Also extending at right angles of the line scores 25 are a second plurality of parallel line scores 26 which are in inwardly spaced and parallel relation to the other two opposite perimeters 31 and 33 of the playing surface 21. The score lines 25 and 26 divide the playing surface 21 into a plurality of square areas, like those indicated at 4%, 41, 42, 43 and 44.

Preferably, there are ten score lines 25 and ten score lines 26 which together divide the playing surface 21 into one hundred and twenty one square areas corresponding to and including those previously indicated 40, 41, 42, 43 and 44.

Each of the perimeters 30, 31, 32 and 33 of the playing surface 21 define a players station and certain of the square areas, disposed inwardly on the playing surface 21 rom each perimeter, outline a playing field for each player. These playing fields are generally indicated at 59, 51, 52 and 53 on the accompanying drawings. Each playing field comprises a plurality of the mentioned square areas. For example, the playing field 59 comprises a plurality of square areas of which the square area 40 is an example. Preferably, each playing field has twenty five square areas arranged in closely adjoining pyramidal relation with the pyramidal base along one perimeter of the playing surface 21 and the pyramidal apex near the center of the playing surface 21. This can be seen from the showing of the field of play 51 in the accompanying drawings where the square areas like the square area 41 are arranged as a pyramid based along the perimeter 31. Preferably, there are nine square areas in the base tier of the pyramidally related square areas forming each playing field and the pyramid is five square areas high or in from the particular perimeter of the playing surface providing the particular playing field base.

To set off each playing field from other playing frel s and the remainder of the playing surface 21, the square areas forming each playing field are of a single color diflerent from the colors 'of -any other playing field or the remainder of the playing surface 21. Thus, the square areas forming the playing field 50 in front of the perimeter 30 of the playing surface 21 may, like the square area 40in such playing field, be blue in color as shown on the accompanying drawing; those of the playing field 51 in front of the playing surface perimeter 31 may, like square area 41, be red; those of the playing field 52 in iront of the perimeter 32 like square area 42, may be green; those of the playing field 53 in front of the perimeter 33, may be, like square area 43, brown.

In utilizing twenty-five of the available one hundred and twenty-one square areas of the playing surface '21 in each of the four playing fields, twenty-one square areas of the playing surfiace 21, like the square area 44, are not assigned to any playing field. These unassigned square areas, by virtue of the disposition of the playing fields 50, 51, 52 and 53 are in the relation of two crossing lines or chains 54 extending diagonally across the playing surface 21 from opposite corner-s formed by the meeting of the four perimeters 30, 3'1, 32 and 33. Thus, the lines or chains 54 of square areas 44 separate or set off the playing fields from each other. Preferably, to more ellectively accomplish this junction, the square areas composing the lines or chains 54 of square areas are like the square area 44 of the same color but diflierent trom that of any of the playing fields. As shown, the chain forming square areas may be of a white color.

In Figure 2 of the accompanying drawings, we show specimens 69, 61,62 and 63 of each of several pluraliti'es of peg game pieces to be used with the game board 20 just described. Each peg game piece is substantially uniform shape and dimension. However, each peg game piece of a particular plurality of peg game pieces is of a color corresponding in color to that of one of the playing fields S0, 51, 52 and 53- For example, the piece 60 and the plurality of peg game pieces of which it is a specimen is as shown, blue in color; the piece 61 and its plurality thereof', is red; the piece 62 and its colleagues, is green; and the piece 63 and its correspondents, brown.

The number of peg game pieces in each plurality of peg game pieces is. not criticalyexcept there should be enough ,of them and any over one hundred and forty-four are superfluous. We find that, if eachplurality of peg game pieces have about a hundred, most game situations may be met.

In order that the peg game pieces may be used in conjunction with the game board 20, we provide the game board with a plurality of holes such as those marked 70, 71, 72 and 73. The holes are formed at the vertices of the line scores 25 and 26 and of the perimeters 30, 31, 32' and 33. n Thus, at each corner of each square area of the playing surface 21 there will be a hole to receive, when the same, is thrust endwise therein, one or another of said peg game pieces 60, 61, 62 and 63.

- Each of the peg game pieces of the pluralities 'of which the peg game pieces 60, 61, 62 and 63 are specimens being of the same cross sectional dimension and shape, such as the circular -cylindrical shape shown in Figures 2 and of the accompanying drawings, they are all insertable in any of the holes 76, 71, 72 and 73 since each hole is of a correspondingly same cross sectional dimension and shape, such as the circular-cylindrical shape shown in Figures 3 and 4 of the accompanying drawings.

In addition to the peg game pieces mentioned, we contemplate that card game pieces like those now to be described may be used to good effect with the. game board 20. The principal card game pieces comprise alphabet cards, like those indicated 80, 81, 82 and 83 illustrated in Figure 9 of the accompanying drawing. Preferably, there are four sets of twenty-six such cards in each set, each card of each set bearing an imprint 86 of an alphabet letter in a color corresponding to the'color of one of the playing fields 50, 51, 52 and 53. Hence, card 80 has an imprint 86 of an alphabet letter in blue like playing field 4 54}; card 81 in red like playing field 51; card 82 in green as in playing field 52 and card 83 in the brown of playing field 53.

In play, two to four players each take positions around the game board 20, each facing one of the perimeters 30, 31, 32 and 33. Each player is supplied a quantity of peg game pieces 60, 61, 62 or 63 of the color corresponding to the color of the field of 'pl-ay. before him. For example, the player whose playing station is along the perimeter 30 having the playing field 50 which is blue in color receives a supply of blue peg game pieces like the peg game piece 60. The one hundred and four alphabet cards exemplified by game card pieces '80, 81, 82 and 83 are then shuffled and stacked face down in a position for drawing by each player. The first player, determined in any way desired, such 'as'by a preliminary draw by all players for high letter card, draws the uppermost card on the stacked pack. Then, the player places one or his peg game pieces in the hole of the field of play having the color corresponding to that with which the just drawn card is imprinted and retains the card drawn in an open exposed hand. The next player does the same and each takes his turn, drawing cards and inserting peg game pieces towards two objectives: the first, to draw cards whose letters together spell words and, the second, to insert pegs into holes at all four corners of a square area on the playing surface 21.

As a player puts the final (fourth) peg game piece into the last open of the four holes at the vertices of any square area on the playing surface, he is accorded certain privileges of which one is to take those alphabet cards which in his hand together spell a word from his hand and spread them across marginal area 22 in an open table book to obtain a score by the word thus ispelled and the advantage of discarding cards from hand. An added bit to the game may be had by giving the player who by inserting the final peg game piece thus completes a square, the additional right to draw any card contained in his opponents hand if 'all or most of the peg game pieces used to entrame the square area are those of the same color .as his field of play. Another fillip will be found in providing a fifth variety of peg game pieces of which the peg game piece '64, shown in Figures 2 and 8 of the accompanying drawing, is illustrative.

The peg game piece '64 and its contemporaries are all of the same color but different than any of the other p'luralities of peg game pieces. For example, the particular peg game piece 64 is shown to be black in 'color. In this plurality of peg game pieces but twenty-four will be needed, as will be explained hereinafter. Each peg game piece, of which the one indicated 64 is an example, may be of a polygonal cross section and dimension such as illustrated in Figures 2 and 8 of the accompanying drawing. Thus, none of the peg game pieces like 64 may be inserted in the game board holes like 70, 71, 72 or 73. In order to receive these peg game pieces, we provide the game board with a plurality of holes 74 only at the vertices of the perimeters 30, 31, 32 and 33 and the vertices of the square areas in the chains 54 at which adjoining fields of play 50, 51, 52 and 53 join. Each of said holes 74 have the same distinct cross sectional dimension and shape as do the peg game pieces of which the peg game 'piece 64 is a specimen. For example, as shown in the accompanying drawings the holes exemplified by the hole 74 may have a polygonal shape like that of the triangle illustrated in Figures 6 and 7 of the accompanying drawings. Hence, none of the peg game pieces like 60, 61, 62 and 63 may be inserted in any of the holes exemplified by the hole 74. Only peg game pieces of the plurality of peg game pieces exemplified by the peg game piece 64 may be inserted into these latter holes.

Now, the player must draw a card enabling him to use a peg game piece of the kind exemplified by the'peg game piece 64 if he is to enframe square areas bordering any fields of play. To provide such cards the card game pieces may include such cards as those indicated 84 in Figure of the accompanying drawings bearing a black colored imprint 86, of the vowel letters- A, E, I, O, Uor of the word 'WIL We find that, where 4 sets of alphabet cards are used, about twenty vowel cards and four WILD cards provide an interesting modification. These cards are, like the alphabet cards, shuffled in the initial stack and in turn drawn, being used in word spelling combinations as before described for score obtaining advantages.

Any of a great number of interesting conventions and varieties may be developed in the rules and playing of the game. Essentially, however, they all center about the elements we have here described.

We claim:

1. In a card-peg-board game, in combination, a plurality of cards, a plurality of pegs and a game board; said game board having a fiat play surface of square outline and providing a playing station along each side; said play surface bearing a plurality of spaced parallel marking lines extending normal to one side of said play surface and a second plurality of spaced parallel marking lines extending normal to the first mentioned plurality of marking lines and forming a plurality of square areas on the play surface; all of said square areas in a closed block pyramidic figure in front of each play station having its pyramidic base along one side of the play surface defining a field of play for that play station; all of the square areas within each said field of play being of the same color and different from the color of any other square areas on the play surface; the square areas on the playing surface remaining and outside said fields of play being of the same color and different from the color of any other square area on the play surface and being in two straight lines extending diagonally across said play surface and intersecting at the center of the play surface; said play surface having a plurality of holes; each hole being at each intersection of said marking lines; said plurality of pegs comprising four sets of pegs; the pegs of each set of pegs being of the same color as one of said fields of play and being insertable in a hole of said plurality of holes in said play surface; said plurality of cards comprising four sets of cards; the cards of each set of cards being imprinted with an alphabetic letter symbol in the same color as one of said fields of play whereby the holding of a card determines, by its color imprint, the color of the field of play into a hole of which the card holder may place and insert a peg of the color of the field of play at the play station of the card holder to the end that, by holding cards, pegs of the color of the field of play in front of the card holder are progressively placed in the holes at the most of all four corners of a plurality of said square areas and at the same time a plurality of cards having by their alphabetic letter symbols a word spelling relation are cumulatively assembled and, by said placing of pegs and assembling of cards, a score in the game is made.

2. In a card-peg-board game described in claim 1 in which the entire plurality of square areas on the play surface total 121, there being 25 square areas in each of said fields of play and 11 square areas in each of said two intersecting lines of square areas and there being a minimum of 26 cards in each of said sets of cards.

3. In a card-peg-board game described in claim 2 having in addition a fifth set of pegs and a fifth set of cards; the pegs of the fifth set of pegs being of the same color and difierent in color than that of any other of said sets of pegs; the cards of the fifth set of cards being imprinted with one of the vowel alphabetic symbols in the same color as the pegs of said fifth set of pegs whereby a holding of a card of said fifth set of cards qualifies the holder to insert a peg of said fifth set of pegs into a hole at one corner of the square areas of said intersecting straight lines relation and thus to gain super scores in the game.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 689,137 Snyder Dec. 17, 1901 1,068,449 Reeder July 29, 1913 1,076,307 Nicholson Oct. 21, 1913 1,136,625 Sonsikowski Apr. 20, 1915 1,474,504 Allen Nov. 20, 1923 1,497,087 Butler June 10, 1924 2,187,808 Parker Ian. 23, 1940 2,265,334 Armbruster Dec. 9, 1941

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3055662 *Jun 18, 1959Sep 25, 1962Glennen A KempBowling game device
US3342493 *Feb 13, 1964Sep 19, 1967Lang James WMathematics game board
US3594003 *Oct 4, 1968Jul 20, 1971Elder Clarence LProgrammed association game
US3764135 *Dec 15, 1971Oct 9, 1973G MadisonEmpathy game
US3948524 *Mar 14, 1974Apr 6, 1976Robert B. LaddGame apparatus
US4239230 *Dec 28, 1978Dec 16, 1980Shoptaugh Philip LPeg board game
US4277066 *Nov 10, 1980Jul 7, 1981Hough Sherman CGame apparatus
US4448423 *Sep 20, 1982May 15, 1984Augusta George VBoard game
US4591161 *Sep 18, 1984May 27, 1986Vanderhoof John RMethod and apparatus for a game
US4773651 *Jul 28, 1987Sep 27, 1988George PapapavlouWord game and board
US5054788 *Sep 27, 1989Oct 8, 1991Kirby Agnes LBoard game
US5405145 *Aug 10, 1994Apr 11, 1995Jones; Albert C.Dice game with wild die
US5657989 *Nov 6, 1995Aug 19, 1997Acoba; CorwinFamily chore board game
US5863043 *Feb 24, 1995Jan 26, 1999Bitner; GaryDeck of playing cards for playing alphabet learning games and spelling games
US6170823Aug 17, 1999Jan 9, 2001Robert J. KintnerCatena board game
US6250633 *Feb 4, 2000Jun 26, 2001Mani MohtashamBoard game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/267, 273/282.1, 273/272, 273/299, 273/306
International ClassificationA63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0423
European ClassificationA63F3/04F