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Publication numberUS2767440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1956
Filing dateFeb 14, 1955
Priority dateFeb 14, 1955
Publication numberUS 2767440 A, US 2767440A, US-A-2767440, US2767440 A, US2767440A
InventorsNels Nelsson
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suspended ceiling construction
US 2767440 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1956 NELSSON 2,767,440

SUSPENDED CEILING CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 5, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet l 7% %INVZNTOR.

N. NELSSON SUSPENDED CEILING CONSTRUCTION Oct. 23, 1956 Filed Aug. 5. 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. f' a4 United States Patent SUSPENDED CEILING CONSTRUCTION 177,936, August 5, 1950. This application February 14, 1955, Serial No. 487,881

Claims. c1. 20-4 This invention relates to building construction and more particularly to a suspended ceiling type construction.

This application is a continuation of my copending application Serial No. 177,936, filed August 5, 1950, and now abandoned, which in turn was a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 125,478, filed November 4, 1949, and now abandoned.

in the erection of a ceiling of this type, clips are frequently used in securing the ceiling runners to the underside of the overhead supporting members. Difliculty, however, is often encountered in obtaining an effective hold of the runners by the clips which will withstand repeated shocks and vibrations caused, for instance, by the subsequent installation of the electrical and plumbing systems. To avert the danger of the ceiling collapsing due to the clips Working loose from the runners as a result of these shocks and vibrations, the clips are often reinforced by tie Wires and the like embracing both the supporting member and the runner. The advantages, therefore, of the clips are offset by the increase in time and effort required in applying these tie Wires.

Heretofore various clips have been proposed which are of such design as to be awkward to handle when positioning the clips into holding relation with the runners.

Thus it is one of the objects of this invention to provide a ceiling type construction, employing holding clips, which is capable of withstanding excessive shocks and vibrations without the necessity of reinforcing the clips with tie wires and the like.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a holding clip which is easy to handle and apply and will facilitate the erection of the ceiling.

It is a further object of this invention to provide means whereby separate ceiling runners may readily be spliced together in end-to-end relation.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a method of erecting a ceiling which is simple, effective, and inexpensive.

Further and additional objects will appear from the description, accompanying drawings, and appended claims.

In accordance with one embodiment of this invention, a ceiling construction is provided comprising the combination of an overhead supporting member, a ceiling runner arranged at the underside of the supporting member and disposed in transverse relation with respect thereto, panels arranged in edge-to-edge relation mounted on said runner, and clips embracing the supporting member for resiliently holding the runner thereagainst. The portion of the runner which is engaged by the clips is provided with a longitudinally extending protuberance which effects a locking engagement between the runner and cooperating clip.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference should be made to the drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary sectional view of a portion of the ceiling formed of plain-edge type panels taken along line 1ll of Fig. 3, wherein a channel-supporting memher is employed;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view, similar to- Fig. l, of a portion of a ceiling wherein kerfed-edge panels are employed;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary top plan view of a ceiling showing two sections of a ceiling runner spliced together in end-to-end relation;

Fig. 4 is a framentary view of Fig. 3 taken along line l4 thereof;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of the spliced sections of the ceiling runner taken along line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the holding clip, shown in Fig. 3;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional View of a ceiling wherein a Wooden supporting beam is employed;

Fig. 8 is an end view of Fig. 7, with the panels omitted, taken along line 8-3 thereof;

Fig. 9 is a bottom view of Fig. 8 having a portion of the runner cut away so as to expose the holding clip;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary perspective view of the ceiling construction wherein a wooden supporting member is employed; and

Fig.1l is a perspective view of the clip shown in Fig. 10.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to Figs. 1 through 4, a suspended ceiling type construction is shown wherein a channel-type, metallic supporting.

member or beam 15 is employed. Abutting the underside 16 of the beam are spaced elongated ceiling runners 17, only one of which is shown, disposed at substantially a right angle with respect to the supporting beam. The

ceiling runner 17 is resiliently held in abutting relationship with the beam 15 by means of a clip 18 The ceiling runner 1'7 is adapted to hold a plurality of panels, either the plain-edge type Zila, Ztib, as seen in Fig. l, or the kerfed-edge type 21a, 21b, as seen in Fig. 2, in edge-toedge relationship.

The ceiling runner .22 is constructed preferably of sheet metal and is provided with a web section 22 which is adapted to be positioned intermediate adjacent panel's, see

igs. l and 2. Formed at the lower edge portion of web section 22 is a substantially T-shaped flange 23. Formed at the opposite or upper edge portion of web section 22 is an L-shaped flange 25. The T-shaped flange has one portion thereof of double thickness and the other portion thereof of single thickness of material. Thus, in order to attain proper alignment of the supported panels, the outer edge or lip 24 of the single thickness. portion of the flange is bent upwardly an amount equal to the single thickness of the material. The L-shaped flange 25 abuts the underside 16 of the supporting beam and has formed in the outer edge thereof a longitudinally extending rib or head 25 which projects downwardly from the underside 16 of the beam.

When it is necessary to connect in endto-end relationship two runners l7 and 17, as seen in Fig. 3, a splicing element 27 is employed. The element 27 is substantially channel-shaped in cross-scction, as seen in Fig. 1, and, when connecting adjacent runners, it has one flange portion 28a thereof disposed intermediate the rib 26 and the web section 22 of the two runners, and has the other flange 28b disposed intermediate the lip 24 and the web section 22 of the runners. The flanges 28a and 23b of element 27 are normally divergent a slight amount so that, when the element is positioned as shown, the flanges 28a and 23b will exert a positive force on the corresponding portions of the L-shaped and T-shaped flan es, respectively, of the runners l7 and 17. This positive force alone is sufficient to hold the adjacent runners in their proper relative positions and therefore eliminates the need for tying or welding the element to the adjacent runners. The bead 26 and the lip 24 of the runners .pre-

vent'disengagement of the element 27 therefrom. The adjacent runners may readily be spliced together by positioning the flange 28b between lip 24 and web section 22 of one runner and then pressing the other flange 28a until it snaps in place behind the bead 26. In connecting the second runner 17 the same procedure is followed.

The clip 18, as heretofore mentioned, embraces the supporting beam 15 and resiliently holds the ceiling runner 17 in abutting relationship with respect thereto. The clip is formed of heavy wire or rod-like material and has a center or cross section 30 adapted to rest on the upper surface 31 of beam 15 and has formed at either end of said center section laterally extending legs 32 and 33. The legs 32 and 33 are of like construction and each comprises a first segment 34, which is integral with the center section 30 and extends downwardly, outwardly, and rearwardly therefrom in bowed fashion, as seen in Figs. 1, 3, and 6. Integral with each segment 34 and angularly disposed with respect thereto is a second segment 35 which extends toward the supporting beam 15, as seen in Fig. 4. The second segment 35 in this instance is disposed substantially parallel with respect to the plane formed by the supported panels. The segment 35 terminates at a point adjacent to or abutting the supporting beam 15. Extending substantially at a right angle downwardly from second segment 35 is a third segment 36 which engages the corresponding side of the supporting beam 15 and prevents twisting of the clip with respect thereto. Integral therewith and extending transversely from each segment 36 is the fourth or runner-engaging segment 37 which is bowed slightly upwardly so as to effect resilient engagement with the runner. It is to be noted that the points of contact of the clip and runner and the point of contact of the center section 30 of the clip and the beam are in a vertical plane. That is to say that the spacing between the points of contact is the same as the vertical dimension of the side 15 of the supporting beam 15. Thus the tendency of the runner to twist or pivot the clip about the center section 30 is minimized and the clip remains at all times in firm engagement with the supporting beam and the abutting flange 25 of the runner. As seen in Fig. 1, segments 37 engage the L-shaped flange 25 of the runner 17 behind head 26, and thus the clip is effectively held in looking relation with respect to the runner. Besides serving to prevent the clip from becoming disengaged from the runner 17, the bead or rib 26 gives added strength to the L-shaped flange 25.

The leg portions 32 and 33 of the clip 18 are not limited to the particular shape shown but may be bowed outwardly from the beam in a curved or rounded form if so desired. The purpose of having the legs divergent or bowed is to facilitate manual positioning of the clips into holding relationship with respect to the runner. Such bowing also lends resilience to the clip.

In erecting a ceiling of the type shown in Figs. 1 through 4, clips 18, of the number desired, are first arranged in embracing spaced relation along the beam 15. Thereafter the runner is brought into abutting engagement with the underside of the beam and temporarily held in place by one hand of the applicator. The latter then with the other hand grips the laterally projecting divergent lcg portions of the clip and causes the clip to pivot about center section 3t) as an axis until the end segments 37-thereof snap in place behind the head 26. If two runner sections are to be connected in end-to-end relation, this connecting or splicing operation is performed prior to positioning of the runner against the beam 15. After the runner is in position the panels are hung on the T- shaped flange 23 of the runner, either as shown in Fig. l or Fig. 2, depending on the type of panels employed.

In Figs. 7 through a modified form of suspended ceiling construction is shown wherein wooden stud-like supporting beams 38 are employed. In this instance the same type of ceiling runner 17 is used. The runner is held in abutting relationship with the underside 47 of the beam 38 by means of a modified clip 40. The clip 40 is fastened to the beam 38 by a flat-headed nail or screw 41, as seen in Fig. 7.

The clip 411*, as seen more clearly in Fig. 11, is formed preferably of sheet metal and comprises a substantially flat body portion 42 having formed at one side thereof a pair of parallel, laterally-extending fingers or prongs 43 and 44. The fingers 43 and 44 are provided with longitudinally extending ribs so as to give greater strength and rigidity thereto. The side 45 of the body portion 42 opposite the fingers 43 and 44 is slightly bowed. The edge 46 of the bowed portion is adapted to grip or bite into the underside 47 of the beam 38 when the clip is placed in holding relation with respect to the runner as seen in Fig. 7. Positioned within the space 48, formed intermediate fingers 43 and 44, is the nail or screw 41. The fingers 43 and 44 are adapted to resiliently engage the bead 26 formed in the L-shaped flange 25 of the runner 1'7, when the clip 40 is mounted on the beam 33.

In erecting a ceiling of this type, the nail 41 is first driven part way into the beam 38, the runner is then positioned against the underside 47 of the beam and transversely with respect thereto so that the outer edge of the L-shaped flange of the runner engages the shank 50 of the nail 41. While the runner is held in this position by one hand of the applicator, the clip 40 is brought into engagement with the nail 41 so that the latter is disposed intermediate fingers 43 and 44. The fingers are positioned so that they engage the L-shaped flange 25 of the runner in a manner shown in Fig. 9, when the nail 41 is driven the full amount into the supporting beam 38. As the nail is driven to its full extent into the beam so as to effect holding of the runner by the clip, the edge 46 of the clip tends to grip or bite into the undersurface 47 of the beam and prevents relative movement of the clip with respect to the beam. Furthermore, fingers 43 and 44 pressing against the underside of the flange 25 cause the free edge of said flange to grip or bite into the underside of the beam and thereby hold the runner fast with respect thereto.

Thus it will be seen that a suspended ceiling type of construction has been provided wherein the ceiling runners are securely held against the supporting beams by clips, without further reinforcement, so as to withstand excessive and repeated shock or vibration. Furthermore, clips have been provided which are of such form as to be easily handled and positioned in place by the applicator. Also, inexpensive and effective means have been provided for splicing together ceiling runners in end-to-end relationship.

While several embodiments of this invention are shown above, it will be understood, of course, that the invention is not to be limited thereto, since many modifications may be made, and it is contemplated, therefore, by the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. A construction of the class described comprising an elongated support, an elongated runner transversely disposed with respect to said support, said runner having a flange, the outer surface of which is in contact with one surface of said support and being provided with an elongated shoulder formed intermediate the free edge of said flange and a Web of the runner from which said flange extends, said shoulder projecting away from the inner surface of said flange, a portion of said flange intermediate said web and said shoulder being depressed relative to said shoulder, and a wire clip resiliently holding said flange in contact with said support; said clip including a center section contacting the surface of said support opposite that contacted by said runner flange, intermediate sections extending angularly from the ends of said center section and being provided with thumb-engageable portions spaced relative to one another a greater distance than the width of said support adjacent said runner flange, and end sections extending angularly from said intermediate sections and being provided with humped portions having the peaks thereof in resilient engagement with said depressed flange portion, the space between said peaks being substantially the same as the width of said support adjacent said runner flange, the free ends of said end sections being offset to facilitate simultaneous sliding of said hump portions past said flange shoulder into snap-in engagement with said depressed flange portion upon manual sliding movement of said clip on said support toward said runner.

2. In a construction of the class described having an elongated support and an elongated runner transversely disposed with respect to the support, the runner having a flange the outer surface of which is in contact with one surface of the support and being provided with an elongated shoulder formed intermediate the free edge of the flange and a web of the runner from which the flange extends, the shoulder projecting away from the inner surface of the flange, a portion of the flange intermediate the web and shoulder being depressed with respect to the shoulder, the improvement which comprises a wire clip for resiliently holding the runner flange in contact with the support, said clip including a center section for contacting the surface of the support opposite that contacted by the runner flange, intermediate sections extending angularly from the ends of said center section and being provided with thumb-engageable portions spaced relative to one another a greater distance than the length of said center section which contacts the support, and endsections extending angularly from said intermediate sections and being provided with humped portions having the peaks thereof resiliently engageable with the depressed flange portion, the space between said peaks being substantially the same as the length of said center section which contacts the support, the free ends of said end sections being offset to facilitate simultaneous sliding of said hump portions past said flange shoulder into snapin engagement with said depressed flange portion upon manual sliding movement of said clip on said support toward said runner; the linear distance between the peak of each hump portion and the surface of the center section in contact with the support, when said clip is in unstressed condition, being less than the linear distance between the surface of the depressed flange portion contacted by said peak and the surface of the support contacted by said center section, when the support and run ner are in assembled relation.

3. A construction of the class described comprising an elongated support, an elongated runner transversely disposed with respect to said support, said runner having a flange, the outer surface of which is in contact with one surface of said support and being provided with an elongated shoulder formed intermediate the free edge of said flange and a web of the runner from which said flange extends, said shoulder projecting away from the inner surface of said flange, a portion of said flange intermediate said web and said shoulder being depressed relative to said shoulder, and a wire clip resiliently holding said flange in contact with said support; said clip including a center section contacting the surface of said support opposite that contacted by said runner flange, intermediate sections extending angularly from the ends of said center section and being provided with thumb-engageable portions spaced relative to one another a greater distance than the length of said center section, and end sections extending angularly from said intermediate sections and being provided with humped portions having the peaks thereof in resilient engagement with said depressed flange portion, the space between said peaks being substantially the same as the length of said center section, the free ends of said end sections being offset to facilitate simultaneous sliding of said hump portions past said flange shoulder into snap-in engagement with said depressed flange portion upon manual sliding movement of said clip on said support toward said runner.

4-. A construction of the class described comprising an elongated support, an elongated runner transversely disposed with respect to said support, said runner having a flange, the outer surface of which is in contact with one surface of said support and being provided with an elongated shoulder formed intermediate the free edge of said flange and a web of the runner from which said flange extends, said shoulder projecting away from the inner surface of said flange, a portion of said flange intermediate said web and said shoulder being depressed relative to said shoulder, and a wire clip resiliently holding said flange in contact with said support; said clip including a center section contacting the surface of said support opposite that contacted by said runner flange, intermediate sections extending angularly from the ends of said center section and being provided with thumb-engageable portions spaced relative to one another a greater distance than the length of said center section in contact with said support, and end sections extending angularly from said intermediate sections and being provided with humped portions having the peaks thereof in resilient engagement with said depressed flange portion, the space between said' peaks being substantially the same as the width of said support adjacent said runner flange, the juncture between said intermediate sections and said end sections being spaced from the surface of the support contacted by the runner flange a greater distance than the shoulder of said flange projects from the same surface of the support.

5. In a construction of the class described having an elongated support and an elongated runner transversely disposed with respect to the support, the runner having a flange the outer surface of which is in contact with one surface of the support and being provided with a single elongated shoulder formed intermediate the free edge of the flange and a web of the runner from which the flange extends, the shoulder projecting away from the inner surface of the flange, a portion of the flange intermediate the web and shoulder being depressed with respect to the shoulder, the improvement which comprises a wire clip for resiliently holding the runner flange in contact with the support, said clip including a center section for contacting the surface of the support opposite that contacted by the runner flange, intermediate sections extending angularly from the ends of said center section and being provided with thumb-engageable portions spaced relative to one another a greater distance than the length of said center section, and end sections extending angularly from said intermediate sections and being provided with humped portions having the peaks thereof resiliently engageable with the depressed flange portion, the space between said peaks being substantially the same as the length of said center section, the free ends of said end sections being offset to facilitate simultaneous sliding of said hump portions past said flange shoulder into snap-in engagement with said depressed flange portion upon manual sliding movement of said clip on said support toward said runner; the linear distance between the peak of each hump portion and the surface of the center section in contact with the support, when said clip is in unstressed condition, being less than the linear distance between the surface of the depressed flange portion contacted by said peak and the surface of the support contacted by said center section, when the support and runner are in assembled relation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,625,866 Pawling Apr. 26, 1927 1,984,028 Macleod Dec. 11, 1934 2,402,318 Edwards June 18, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1625866 *Nov 26, 1924Apr 26, 1927Pawling George FMeans of supporting ceiling furring
US1984028 *May 3, 1932Dec 11, 1934F E Berry Jr & Co IncWall or ceiling construction
US2402318 *Feb 23, 1945Jun 18, 1946Harvey C EdwardsRoofing fastener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2843230 *Dec 7, 1953Jul 15, 1958United States Gypsum CoBuilding construction
US2890583 *Nov 20, 1957Jun 16, 1959Fred GrosskortenhausOpenable suspended ceilings
US2963751 *Jun 2, 1958Dec 13, 1960Joseph A ManciniDemountable flush type acoustical ceilling construction
US2988184 *Aug 4, 1958Jun 13, 1961Zinn Daniel LCeiling panel
US2993240 *Sep 28, 1956Jul 25, 1961Airson Co IncCeiling tile mounting construction
US3000474 *Dec 8, 1954Sep 19, 1961Nat Aluminum CompanyCeiling suspension rail
US3012640 *Sep 20, 1955Dec 12, 1961Chicago Metallic Sash CoAnchor clip
US3084402 *Nov 17, 1958Apr 9, 1963Mosaic Tile CompanyAcoustical panel
US3089569 *Jan 19, 1959May 14, 1963Brasco Mfg CompanyBuilding construction
US3108334 *Jul 21, 1958Oct 29, 1963Olov LindstromSuspension device for ceiling boards and the like
US3965639 *Feb 3, 1975Jun 29, 1976United States Gypsum CompanyBeam-reinforced ceiling panels
US4034531 *Apr 2, 1976Jul 12, 1977United States Gypsum CompanyCeiling system
US5239801 *Aug 7, 1992Aug 31, 1993Wood Ceilings, Inc.Clip-on wooden drop ceiling
US6327828 *Apr 28, 2000Dec 11, 2001Decks, Inc.Structural member for roof structure or deck
DE1759482B1 *May 6, 1968Sep 11, 1969Kidney Bruce WUnterdecke
DE3019844A1 *May 23, 1980Dec 3, 1981Herzog Thomas Prof DrVorrichtung zur befestigung einer fassadenplatte
DE3546728C2 *Jan 16, 1985May 23, 1991Tubag Trass-, Zement- Und Steinwerke Gmbh, 5473 Kruft, DeWalling equipment for enclosing sloping ground
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/387, 52/506.7, 403/397
International ClassificationE04B9/16, E04B9/06
Cooperative ClassificationE04B9/16
European ClassificationE04B9/16