Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2767558 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1956
Filing dateMar 30, 1955
Priority dateMar 30, 1955
Publication numberUS 2767558 A, US 2767558A, US-A-2767558, US2767558 A, US2767558A
InventorsJohn S Palmer, Ralph E Wallenbrock
Original AssigneeWhirlpool Seeger Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air blast refrigerated cabinet
US 2767558 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1956 R. E. WALLENBROCK ET AL 2,767,558

AIR BLAST REFRIGERATED CABINET Filed March 50, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet l E ..f I 5.1.

l L J mmmw @s 66 6M Pa-ZW?" Oct. 23, 1956 R. E. WALLENBROCK ET AL 2,767,558

AIR BLAST REFRIGERATED CABINET 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 50, 1955 w :ou

Oct. 23, 1956 R. E. wALLENBRocK ET AL AIR BLAST REFRIGERATED CABINET 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 50, 1955 Oct. 23, 1956 R. E. WALLENBROCK ET AL 2,767,558

AIR BLAST REFRIGERATED CABINET 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed March 30, 1955 @07271 15T Palmer PMCD-H intr/,ses AIR BLAST REFRIGERATED CABINET Ralph E. Wallenbroclr and John S. Palmer, Evansville,

d., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Vvhirlpool- Seeger Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Application March 30, 1935, Serial No. 497,977 15 Claims. (Cl. (i2-117.259

This invention relates generally to refrigerated cabinets, but is more particularly directed to a cabinet of this character that utilizes forced air circulation t-herewithin to accomplish a cooling of the contents thereof.

ln the conventional vertically arranged domestic or household mechanically refrigerated cabinet a refrigerant evaporator cooling element is usually disposed in a portion of the food storage area and the food items which it is desired be maintained at the lowest temperatures are generally positioned in closest proximity thereto for cooling purposes. Other portions of the food storage area generally contain shelves upon which are stored other food articles and this storage area is frequently referred to as the food storage compartment. The natural atinity of warm air particles for cold surfaces quite naturally sets up convection currents of air within the food storage area which operate to bring the warmer air particles within the cabinet into contact with the colder surfaces of the evaporator thereby reducing the temperature of all the air contained within the food storage area. In this manner the temperatures of the food articles in the food storage compartment are reduced and the heat thus removed is transferred by way of the refrigerant and the refrigerantcarrying conduits to a condenser for dissipation to the outside atmosphere in accordance with well understood principles of refrigeration.

Although this type of refrigerated cabinet which is commonly referred to as an upright chest is universally accepteu and widely used it is a well known fact that it is not entirely suitable for all the different purposes for which it is presently employed. One of the most serious objections thereto results from the fact that there is usually an appreciable temperature gradient or variation between different points within the food storage compartment thus creating some confusion as to the best or proper location in which to store particular food items therewithin. In addition, a refrigerated cabinet of this character does not have, because of its primary dependence upon the natural convection of air currents plus only a limited amount of secondary heat conduction along its interior walls, the flexibility or cooling efhciency desired in order to eect a proper cooling of all the contents thereof. Furthermore, the natural tendency of refrigerated cabinets of this character to accumulate large deposits of frost in the vicinity of the colder surfaces in the food storage area, thus requiring frequent removal or defrosting with possible loss or damage to the contents during such removal operations, represents a continuing source of annoyance and objection to the user thereof. It is a feature of the proposed invention, therefore, to describe a refrigerated cabinet which intentionally deviates considerably, in structural arrangement, from that of the present unsatisfactory and inetticient conventional cabinets, and which, in so doing provides a cabinet that overcomes the disadvantageous features and characteristics of such prior cabinets, and which, furthermore, is highly adaptable for the storing and cooling of foodstuffs.

One of the principal objects of the present invention 1s StatCS to provide an upright refrigerated cabinet wherein a substantially uniform temperature is maintained throughout its food storage area and where there is no appreciable deposit or accumulation of frost formation within the food storage compartment thereof.

Another principal object is to provide a refrigerated cabinet having improved flexibility and cooling efficiency in the cooling of food items placed therewithin.

An important object of the instant inven 'on resides in the provision of a refrigerated cabinet utilizing forced air circulation to provide for air-blast cooling of the contents thereof.

Another important object is to provide a simplified and removable air duct or llue arrangement for a refrigerated cabinet employing air-blast cooling.

Another object is to provide an improved condensate collecting and disposal arrangement for a refrigerated cabinet employing forced air circulation.

A further object is to provide an improved electric heater defroster for an evaporator cooling element in an air-blast refrigerated cabinet.

A still further object is to provide a refrigerated cabinet wherein an evaporator cooling element is remotely disposed from the food storage area and wherein air circulation means are operative for directing air into intimate heat exchange relation with said evaporator and thereafter with the interior and contents of the food storage area of the cabinet.

Another object is to provide in an air-blast type of refrigerated cabinet an improved condensate collecting and disposal means wherein a portion of the condensate collected operates to provide a positive air and gas seal or trap which restricts the admission into the food storage area of extraneous matters or air particles from outside the cabinet, and which additionally restricts leakage of air from inside the cabinet to the outside thereof.

A yet still further object is to provide an air-blast type of refrigerated cabinet wherein a wall of each, of one or more, individual basket-like food storage containers coopcrates with the walls of a food storage compartment to provide an air duct or air flue for guiding air particles through said compartment after said particles have been cooled by being passed into intimate thermal contact with a refrigerant evaporator cooling element.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds, and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification. For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional side view of the proposed cabinet but having portions of the components thereof shown in elevation;

Figure 2 is a front elevational View of the cabinet illustrated in Figure l but shown with the lower portion thereof partially cut-away and with the cabinet closure door removed;

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional detail of the condensate drain cap and tube structure;

Figure 4 is a top plan View of the drain cap shown in engaged relation with a portion of a defrost heater coil positioned in the refrigerant evaporator;

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the drain cap for the .condensate drainage tube;

Figure 9 isa partial sectional view taken on line of Figure 6;

Figure 10 is an enlarged sectional View showing portions of the cabinet door and the cabinet breaker strip assembly;

Figure 1l is a schematic diagram showing the refrigerant circuit and the refrigerant-carrying conduits thereof;`

Figure l2 is a view similar to Figure 4 but showing the drain cap directly engaging portions of the evaporator' instead of a defrost heater element;

Figure 13 is an enlarged sectional detail of the electric heater defrost element; and

Figure 14 isa schematic wiring diagram of the control circuits for the refrigeration apparatus.

Referring now to the drawings it will be noted that thc preferred embodiment, selected for illustrating the teachings of the present invention, includes a cabinet, generally indicated by the reference numeral 10, which is fashioned with an inner shell or liner 11 having a front access opening therein and a similarly conformed outer shell or liner 12 spaced therefrom by suitable heat insulating material 13. A somewhat similarly fashioned front door or closure member 14 may include an outer liner or panel 15 and an inner panel or pan 16, with suitable heat insulating material 13 therebetween, that is hingedly mounted on cabinet 10 by suitable means such as the hinges 17. The marginal edges of the outer and inner panels 15 and 16, respectively, of said door, may be fastened together by means of a conventional resilient gasket sealing member 18 which, in turn, may be removably attached to the inwardly turned marginal edge of the outer panel 15 by suitable securing means such as the screws 19. The marginal edges of the inner and outer liners 11 and 12, of the cabinet, may be, respectively, inwardly turned and Yoder-rolled, as in dicated, and bridged with a breaker strip assembly such as is indicated generally by the reference numeral 20. Suchnbreaker strip assembly may include a rigid inner member 21, of low-heat conducting material such as Masonite or a reinforced polyester plastic which is afxed to the marginal edges of the respective liners by suitable means such as the screws 22 and an angle bracket 22a, and an outer or covering strip 23 of any suitable wellknown plastic material such as polystyrene which may be held in place by a resilient member such as the spring clip 24. It will be understood, of course, that the door 14 will be provided with a suitable latching and handle mechanism but since these elements form no particular part of the present invention they have been omitted from the drawings.

The bottom wall or oor of the cabinet, preferably, is inclined and `the bottom wall or floor portion 11a of the inner liner 11 may be further formed as a depressed and stepped area with a sump-like recess or well 25 having an opening therein at the bottom thereof. A horizontal partition or baie-like wall member 26, extending from the front almost to the rear of the cabinet, serves to divide the interior or enclosed area of the cabinet inner liner into a food storage compartment 27 and an adjoining air-cooling compartment 28. The rear marginal edge 29 of said partition is upwardly turned and spaced from the rear wall of the liner 11 to provide an air passage in the form of an elongated opening 30 which extends from one side of said inner liner to the other, while a perforated member or screen 31 may be used to provide an open-type front wall or grille-like closure over a front access opening of said air cooling compartment 28.

Since the floor or bottom wall of the cabinet is inclined there is provided a convenient compartmented area 32 therebeneath which may be utilized as a machinery compartment for a portion of the refrigeration apparatus. A conventional hermetic-type motor-compressor unit 33 is supportably positioned within said latter compartment,

by suitable means such as the support brackets 34, and a static condenser 35 may be suspendedly supported from said motor-compressor by suitable brackets such as shown by the reference numeral 36. A generally conventional tube and finned-type of refrigerant evaporator 37 is positioned with the air cooling compartment 28 along with a suitable air circulating or air-moving means. Such air circulating means may include a conventional axial air inlet centrifugal blower 33 mounted in a shrouded scroll-like housing or casing 39 and driven by an electric motor disposed adjacent thereto in compartment 28.` A vertically disposed wall 40 which provides a rear wall for the air cooling compartment 2S additionally functions to provide a batlle or partition which tends to direct or channel the air in said cooling compartment into the axial inlet of said blower. The shrouded scroll 39 exhausts through an opening in said baffle wall 4t) into a converging duct or flue-like air passageway 41 which communicates with the elongated opening or air passageway 30. Thus air admitted through the perforated front wall or grille member 31 is first cooled by passing through and into intimate heat exchange relation with the evaporator 37 and thereafter is circulated by the blower fan 3S into the duct or flue 4l from whence it emerges by way` of air passageway 30 into the food storage compartment 27.

The refrigeration apparatus, which is shown schematically in Figure ll, includes a motor-compressor 33 which discharges by way of a refrigerant-carrying conduit 42 into a condensate evaporating loop portion or coil 43 iixedly secured to the underneath surface of a platform-like hot plate member 44, while the outlet of said coil is connected by a conduit 45 to a dri-wall condenser coil 46 which is suitably secured in good thermal contact to the inner surface of the right side wall of the cabinet outer line 12. The opposite end of coil 46 is connected by conduit 47 to a loop or coil 48 immersed in the oil reservoir portion of said motor-compressor unit and this coil, in turn, is connected by conduit 49 to a dri-wall condenser coil 5) which is mounted in good thermal contact to the inner surface of the opposite or left side wall of the cabinet outer liner 12. The outlet of coil 5t) is connected by conduit 51 to the static condenser` 35, positioned in the apparatus compartment 32, and the discharge side of this latter condenser is connected by conduit 52 to a capillary tube 53 which discharges into the evaporator 37 that, in turn, is connected by the suction line conduit 54 to the motor-compressor 33 to complete the refrigeration circuit or system. It will be understood, of course, that the above refrigeration apparatus will be charged with a suitable refrigerant and the system will be operated in accordance with the generally understood principles of refrigeration.

The evaporator 37 which, preferably, is of the tube and fin-type is generally fashioned with a serpentine shaped refrigerant-carrying coil 55 circumseribed by a plurality of spaced-'apart fins 56 and the unit is positioned so as to be in intimate thermal contact with the inclined oor 11a of the cabinet inner liner member i1. An electric heater element 57 may, if desired, be buried in the evaporator for purposes of defrosting the unit at prescribed intervals. This heater element which is generally serpentine-shaped may be positioned in slot-like openings 53 (Figure l) provided in the tins and dimensioned to receive said element in a tight frictionally engaging relationship. Such heating element, which may 'oe any one of several such elements generally available on the commercial markets, usually is fashioned with a centrally disposed electrical resistance wire 59 surrounded by electrical insulating material 60, in turn, covered with a suitable metallic skin-like covering or sheath 61. The opposite ends of the resistance wire, of said element, are adapted for connection to a suitable source of electrical energy (not shown) which, in turn, may be automatically controlled for energizing said element at prescribed time intervals, in accordance with practises that are presently well understood in the art. Since devices for effecting this automatic operation are somewhat conventional and well known no illustration or description of the details thereof was felt necessary. Of course other well-known defrosting devices may also be used without departing from the teachings hereof and the present invention is likewise applicable where defrosting is accomplished by the use of hot gases that are passed through the evaporator, as well as in cabinets where the defrosting is manually accomplished without the aid of auxiliary or supplementary devices. Y

The well or reservoir 25 in the floor of the cabinet receives a drain pipe or conduit 62, which is Itightly secured in an opening in the bottom thereof by any suitable or well-known means, and this pipe extends some distance into the well 25 so as to provide a trap-like gas or air seal as will presently be understood. Telescopingly fitted over the opposite end of the drain pipe 62 is another pipe or conduit 63 which extends through the insulation 13 and through an opening in the outer shell 12 into the machinery compartment 32. An annular groove or grommet-like channel 64 in said latter pipe is adapted to aid in iixedly positioning and sealing said pipe or tube in place. The conduit 63 is fashioned, preferably, of a suitable low-heat conducting resilient material, such as rubber or any one of the well-known vinyl or polyethylene plastics adaptable for such purposes, and thus will not function to conduct any appreciable amount of heat from one liner of the cabinet to the other. With the conduits 62 and 63 arranged as proposed there is provided a good moisture seal where each of said conduits pass through the respective inner and outer liners thereby substantially prohibiting the ingress of moisture into the insulation material i3. Positioned directly beneath the open end of the tube 63, in the compartment 32, is the condensate evaporating coil 43 and its associated hot plate member 44 which is adapted to support a relatively shallow condensate collecting and evaporating pan 65. Upwardly extending fingers or tab members 66, preferably punched out of the plate 44, may be provided for purposes of positioning or holding the pan 65 in place on said plate.

The inner end or the end of conduit or drain pipe 62 which extends in an upstanding rim-like or flange fashion into the moisture collecting well or reservoir 25 is covered with a drain cover member, indicated generally by the reference numeral 67, and thus when a suitable quantity of liquid has collected in the well 2S the cover cooperates therewith to provide the trap-like positive gas and air seal previously mentioned. This cover, which is fashioned of a suitable high-heat conducting material such as one of the zinc die casting metals or the like, includes a dome-like cap portion 68 dimensioned to fit loosely over the end portion of the pipe 62, and an outwardly haring arm portion 69 fashioned integral therewith. A depending circular flange portion 7@ of said cap is provided with a plurality of recesses or slot-like openings 7l (only two of which are shown) while the outer edge of the arm 69 is concavely recessed or grooved as indicated at 72. The radius of curvature of this concavature is selected, preferably, to conform to that of the metallic sheath 6l of the heater element 57 thus providing for the maximum of physical and thermal Contact surface when used with said heater element. When an electric heater element is not employed for defrosting purposes the edge of said flaring arm need not be concavely recessed as then the arm would directly engage the edges of the tins 56, of the evaporator 37, as shown in Figure 12.

As the evaporator 37 is defrosted, by whatever means preferred, the moisture or condensate draining therefrom will flow down the inclined iloor lla of the cabinet inner liner and be collected in the weil or reservoir 25. The openings 71-7i in the drain pipe covering cap 68 will, of course, permit the liquid to rise in the well 25 inside said cap as Well as outside thereof until it reaches the inwardly extending flange-like edge or rim of pipe 62 whence it will overflow said edge and drain into the pan 65 where it will be evaporated by the heat of coil 43. Upon cessation of the defrosting operation the liquid remaining in the well 25 will continue to provide a highly effective trap or Iseal to prevent the ingress of air, gas or any other extraneous matter from the outside by way of the drain tubes 62 and 63, as well as to prevent 'air from inside the cabinet leading out through these drain pipes. Eventually, of course, upon resumption of the refrigeration cycle the liquid remaining in said well will freeze, as may also any moisture that remains on the iloor of the cabinet inner liner, thus enhancing the sealing effect of the trap formed by said liquid. Upon any subsequent defrosting of the evaporator 37, however, lthe heat therefrom, which is transmitted by Way of the flaring arm 69 to the cap 68, will become operative to melt the frozen liquid in the well 25 and thus permit resumption of flow of liquid condensate through the conduits 62 and 63 to the pan 65. Since the evaporator 37 is also in good thermal contact with the oor 11a of said inner liner any ice formations thereon will likewise be melted by the heat from the defrost operation.

Since the Ifood containers, of which four principal ones are shown, are identical in construction only one such unit will be described in detail. Each container, indicated generally by the reference numeral 73, is of the open-wire or basket-type of construction so as to facilitate the circulation of cooled air into intimate heat exchange relation with the contents therewithin, and is slidably mounted so that it may be rolled out to gain easy access to the contents thereof. The basket is fashioned with a floor or bottom wall 74 of spaced and crossed wire rods or the like with a transversely extending front trim or handle member 74a, and opposite side walls 75--75 of vertically disposed horizontally spaced wire-like rod elements the ends of which are fixedly secured by any suitable means to a reinforcing rim or edging rail member 76 while the opposite ends of said rim are suitably secured to the floor 74. An imperforate rear wall member 77 has the top end edge thereof suitably affixed to the rim 76 while the bottom or lower end edge thereof is suitably secured to the oor 74 of said basket. A generally Z-shaped sliding rail or track member 78 is iixedly secured by suitable means to each side wall of the basket and a roller element 79 is rotatably mounted thereon proximate the inwardly extending end of each of said slide track members. A cooperating channel or track member 88 of generally C- shape is secured, by suitable means such as the rivets shown at 81, to each side wall of the cabinet inner liner and a roller element 82 is rotatably mounted therein proximate the outwardly extending end thereof. The roller element 79, on the track 78, is positioned to ride within the channel and the diameter thereof is dimensioned slightly smaller than the inner spacing of the opposite arms of said channel, while the roller element 82, of the channel track 80, is adapted to ride beneath the upper arm of the track 78 and thus carry a large portion of the weight of said food receptacle. A break 83 in the forward end of the upper arm of the channel 80 permits the roller element to be removed therefrom when the basket is fully extended. A lower horizontally extending arm 84, on the track 78, serves to prevent the food basket from being accidentally tilted upwardly, While a break 85, in said arm 84 proximate the inwardly extending end portion of the track 78, is adapted to cooperate with the break 83, in the channel 80, to effect removal of the food basket from the cabinet when desired.

The embodiment of the cabinet shown herein provides for a shelf 86 of the open-Wire type which may be disposed, as illustrated, at the upper portion of the food storage compartment 27. If desired an open-type rack 87 having a door or .covering member 88 thereon may be positioned on the shelf A86 for purposes of supporting smaller articles of food or articles which do not require the ready accessibility of many of the other articles in the cabinet. It will be understood,"however, that this shelf and rack may be replaced with another food basket receptacle, such as shown at 73, without deviating from any of the teachings of the present invention.

The inner door pan or panel 16, which is fashioned of a suitable and well-known material such as a polystyrene plastic or a laminated phenolic resin is formed,` preferably, so as to provide integrally molded and forwardly projecting shelf members 89 that are spaced vertically one from another a distance that coordinates with the spacing of the food baskets 73. A combination trim and food retainer` member 90 positioned across the front of each shelf may function as a decorative element as well as a retainer for the food articles positioned on these door shelves. The inner door pan 16 is so spaced from the basket receptacles that when the basket receptacles and door shelves are completely filled with food articles there will still be a spacing that may function as a vertical duct-like flue 27a between the baskets and the door through which air may pass in its journey to or from the air cooling compartment 23.

In the embodiment selected for illustrating a preferred concept of the present invention the air circulating means is arranged so that air after being cooled by its passage into heat exchange relation with the evaporator 37, in the air cooling compartment `28, is discharged by the blower 3S into the tiue 41 from where it passes by way of the elongated opening 30 into the food storage compartment 27. In said food storage compartment the individual rear wall members 77, of the food baskets 73, operate to provide a discontinuous bafe which cooperates with the rear and a portion of each side wall, of the inner liner 11, to provide a duct-like air passage or ue 27b which directs the cooled air upwardly into the compartment 27. Of course, a certain portion of such air will pass out through each of the openings formed by the vertical spacing between successive basket rear wall baftie members 77 and t flow down over the contentsof the baskets. The air that remains at the top of said rear wall air passageway will, of course, flow over the open shelf 86 and rack 87 and the contents thereof and thereafter will flow back down through said food compartment to the lower portion thereof. When the baskets 73 are pretty well filled with food articles the cooled air after brushing over said articies will ow down past the front thereof in the tine-like air passage space 27a provided between said baskets and the door 14. `At the lower end of this passage 27a the air flows through the perforated grille-like front wall 31 of the air cooling compartment 28 where it is again brought into heat exchange relation with the evaporator 37. As the air passes into heat exchange relation with the evaporator 37 moisture is removed therefrom and deposited in the form of frost on the surfaces` of said evaporator and from there it is subsequently removed by a defrosting operation of the evaporator. Although the preferred embodiment of the proposed cabinet shows the path of ow of air currents as being from the evaporator up the rear wall and down the front wall of the cabinet it will be appreciated that such direction of air flow might be reversed and a good cooling effect obtained without deviating from the concepts of the present invention.

lf desired, an interior illuminating lighting device 91 may be suitably positioned in the cabinet so as to light the interior thereof upon opening the door. A plunger-type switch 92 mounted so as to be actuable by the door 14 may be employed to turn the light on and off as the door is opened and closed. The switch 92, preferably, is of the single-pole double-throw type having an arm 93 that is biased to one position by a spring such as 94 and is actuated by a plunger 95; This switch may be so arranged that when the door 14 is in a closed position the switch arm 93 engages the contact 96 and completes the electrical `circuit through conductors 97, 98 and 99 to the blower wheel motor 100.

lfood storage compartment 8 When the door is opened the arm 93 96 and opens the blower motor circuit contact 101 and closes 91 through conductors disengages contact and then subsequently engages the the circuit to the lighting device 99, 102 and 103.

In operation the refrigeration apparatus functions in conventional fashion and the thermostatically controlled switch 104 operates according to the demands of the 27, to cycle the refrigeration apparatus and thus fulfill these requirements. The feeler bulb 165 for this latter switch may be positioned, as is well understood, in any particular location whose temperature it is desired be used for controlling the operation of the refrigeration system. In the instant application it is preferred that such control be positioned proximate the upper portion and at the rear of the inner liner, as this is the Storace space which tends to become warm first when the compressor unit is off, although such preference should not be considered as limiting the present invention. lf desired a clip may be provided or the control bulb may be positioned in a well in order to provide for intimate contact between the bulb and the liner.

The electrical switch 92 is arranged, preferably, so that the thermostatically controlled switch 104 may control both the motor-compressor 33 and the blower motor 10() while the door i4 is closed, but upon opening of the door the blower fan motor is stopped although the refrigeration apparatus will be allowed to continue if the demands for refrigeration require such operation. Although it may be otherwise desired it is usually preferred that the blower motor 16d not be operated while the door 14 of the cabinet is open and the arrangement described herein assures that this blo-wer fan will cease operation when the door is opened.

From the foregoing it should now be apparent that a novel and improved air-blast type upright refrigerated cabinet has been shown and described, and it is to be understood that changes may be made in the construction without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope thereof as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells fashioned to define a plurality of compartments having an access opening in each; a closure member hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover said access openings; refrigeration apparatus operative for cooling the interior of the cabinet; said apparatus including an evaporator cooling element and air circulating means disposed in one of said compartments; a first air communicating means between said compartments; a plurality of separately fashioned food storage receptacles having a wall of cach thereof irnpcrfo-rate and being disposed in vertically spaced relation in the other of said compartments; said receptacles being further arranged so that all their imperforate walls are vertically positioned and disposed in substantially the same plane to provide a baffle-like wall having horizontally extending openings therein; said baffle-like wall being spaced from said inner shell and cooperating therewith to form air duct means extending from said first air communicating means inwardly into the other of said compartments; and having said closure member spaced from the access opening of the said one compartment to provide a second air communicating means between said compartments which cooperates with said first air communicating means to effect the flow of air, forced by said air circulating means into intimate heat exchange relation with said evaporator cooling element, successively in a continuous circuit between and through each of said cornpartments.

2. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells fashioned to define a plurality of compartments having an access opening in each; a closure member hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover said access openings; refrigeration apparatus operative for cooling the interior of the cabinet; said apparatus including an evaporator cooling element and air circulating means disposed in one of said compartments; a iirst air communicating means between said compartments; a plurality of food storage receptacles having a wall of each thereof imperforate and being disposed in vertically spaced relation in the other of said compartments; said receptacles being further arranged so that all their imperforate walls are vertically positioned and disposed in substantially the same plane to provide a baie-like wall having a plurality, equal to one less than the number of said receptacles, of vertically spaced and horizontally extending openings therein; said bai'lielike Wall being spaced from said inner shell and disposed to cooperate therewith to form air duct means extending inwardly into the other of said compartments from said first air communicating means; and said closure member being spaced from the access opening of the said one compartment to provide a second air communicating means between said compartments which cooperates with said first air communicating means to effect the ow of air, forced by said air circulating means into intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element, successively in a continuous circuit between and through each of said compartments.

3. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells fashioned to dene adjacent food storage and cooling compartments with an access opening for each compartment; a closure member hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover the access opening of each of said compartments; refrigeration apparatus operative for cooling the interiors of said compartments; said apparatus including an evaporator cooling element and air circulating means disposed in said cooling compartment; an air passageway opening into both of said compartments; a plurality of food storage receptacles slidably disposed in vertical spaced relation in said food storage compartment; each of said receptacles being fashioned of open-wire construction with the rear vertical wall thereof formed of imperforate material; said receptacles being further disposed so that in their fully inserted position in said compartments their imperforate walls provide a discontinuous baffle that cooperates with said inner shell to provide an air duct extending along a rear wall of said compartment; and having said closure member formed with a portion that is spaced from the access openings of said compartments so as to provide an air communicating means between compartments which is adapted to cooperate with said air passageway in providing for the flow of air, forced by said air circulating means into intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element, successively in a continuous circuit between and through each of said compartments.

4. In a refrigerated cabinet the combination, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells arranged to define a space divided by a wall-like partition member into a food storage compartment and an air-cooling compartment; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refrigerantcarrying conduits; heating means for defrosting said evaporator cooling ele'ment; said evaporator cooling element and said `air circulating means being disposed remote from said food ystorage compartment; a plurality of food receptacles providing air baffle means, and having said air baflie means cooperative with said inner shell to provide an air duct within said food storage compartment; moisture evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; means for conveying moisture from said evaporator cooling element to said liquid container including, a moisture collecting member disposed beneath said evaporator cooling element, and -a drain pipe opening into said moisture collecting member and discharging into said liquid container; and a cap member positioned over one end of said drain pipe, and having a portion thereof extending into intimate heat exchange relation with said evaporator cooling element whereby heat from the evaporator during defrostin-g thereof is effective for melting ice formations developed around the opening of said moisture collecting member.

5. 'In a refrigerated cabinet the combination, comprising: spaced apart inner and Vouter shells arranged to define a space divided by a wall-like partition member into a food storage compartment and an air-cooling compartment; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refnigenantcarrying conduits; heating means lfor defrosting said evaporator cooling element; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being `disposed in said air-cooling compartment; a plurality of food receptacles providing air bathe means, and having said air baiiie means cooperative `with said inner shell to provide an air duct lwithin said food storage compartment; moisture evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimat-e thermal contact Vwith -a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; moisture drainage means including, a drain member disposed beneath said evaporator cooling element a-nd having an opening therein, an upstlanding lliange-like wall adjoining said opening, and a drain pipe extending from -said opening and discharging into said liquid container; and a highly heat-conductive cap member positioned over the flanged opening of said drain member, and having a portion thereof that extends into good thermal exchange relationship with said evaporator cooling element whereby heat from the evaporator during defrosting thereof is effective for melting ice formations developed in the vicinity of said cap and the ange-like wall of said drain opening.

l6. In a refrigerated cabinet the combination, comprising: spaced Kapart inner and outer shells arranged to define a space divided by a wall-like partition member into a food storage compa-rtment and an air-cooling compartment; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refr-igerant-canrying conduits; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being disposed in said air-cooling compartment; a plurality of food receptacles providing air baffle means, and having said air baie means cooperative with said inner shell to provide an air duct within said food storage compartment; a defrost heater element disposed in intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element and operative for the defrosting thereof; moist-ure evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; the iioor of said .air-cooling compartment bei-ng formed to provide a moisture collecting well having an opening therein; a drain pipe extending through said opening and into said well to provide an upst-anding wali adjoining said opening and additionally extending through a bottom wall of the cabinet and terminating proximate said liquid container; and a highly heat-conductive cap positioned over the end of said drain pipe extending into said well, and having a portion of said cap disposed so as to extend into good thermal and physical contact with the defrost heater element of said evaporator cooling element whereby heat from the evaporator during defrosting thereof is effective for melting ice formed in said moisture collecting well in the vicinity of said ca 7. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells fashioned to define a food storage compartment land an air-cooling compartment with an access opening for each compartment; a closure member liingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover the access opening of each of said compartments; refrigeration `apparatus operative to cool said compartments including, 'a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refrigerant-carrying conduits; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being disposed in said air-cooling compartment; a plurality of air passageways communicating with each of said compartments; a plurality of food yreceptacles in said food storage compartment providing air bafe means that are cooperative with said inner shell to provide air duct means adjacent a wall of said inner shell and extending through said food storage compartment; a defrost heater element disposed so as to be in intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element and with a bottom wall of said cooling `compartment and operative to effect the defrosting of said evaporator cooling element and to melt formations of ice on the bottom wall of said cooling compartment; moist-ure evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; means for conveying moisture from said evaporator cooling element to said liquid container including, a moisture collecting well disposed beneath said evaporator cooling element, and a drain pipe one end of which extends into said well and the other end of which discharges into said liquid container; and a cover member of highly heat conductive material positioned over the end of said drain pipe extending into said well, and having a portion of said cover member extending into intimate thermal contact with said defrost Ihea-ter element whereby heat from said defrost heater during defrosting of said -evaporator is effective for melting ice formations adjoining the said well and said cover member.

8. In a refrigerated cabinet having a pair of vertically aligned compartments with a front access opening in each, and a closure member `hingedly mounted to cover the access openings, the combination, comprising: refrigeration apparatus operative to cool the compartments and including, a refrigerant evaporator, air moving means, and refrigerant-carrying conduits; said refrigerant evaporator and said air moving means being disposed in the one of the compartments; a pair of air passageways, one in the front and the other in the rear communicating with each of the compartments; a plurality of food receptacles slid ably positioned in the other of the two compartments; said food receptacles being arranged so that one wall of eachprovides bathe means which cooperate with the walls of the other of the two compartments to provide air duct means extending vertically through said other compartment', a defrost heater element buried in said refrigerant evaporator and operative to effect the defrosting thereof; moisture evaporating means including a liquid container located remote from both of the compartments and disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; means for draining moisture removed from said refrigerant evaporator, during the defrosting thereof, to said liquid container including, a smp formed in a bottom wall of the one compartment, and pipe means for conveying moisture from said sump to said liquid container; said pipe having one end thereof extending inwardly into said sump and providing a trap to contain a small quantity of moisture in said sump; and a cover member of highly heat conductive material positioned over the inwardly extending end of said pipe and having a portion of said cover member extending into intimate thermal Contact with said defrost heater ele ment whereby heat from said defrost heater during defrosting of said refrigerant evaporator is operative for melting ice formations in said sump.

9. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer shells fashioned to define a food storage compartment and an air-cooling compartment with an access opening for each compartment; a closure member 'f2 hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover the access opening of each of said compartments; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments and including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refrigerant-carrying conduits; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being disposed in said air-cooling compartment; a plurality of air passageways communicating with each of said compartments; a plurality of food receptacles in said food storage compartment providing air baffle means that are cooperative with said inner shell to provide air duct means adjacent a wall of said inner shell and extending through said food storage compartment; a defrost heater element disposed so as to be in intimate thermal contact Vwith said evaporator cooling element and with a bottom wall of said air cooling compartment and operative to effect the defrosting of said evaporator cooling element and to melt formations of ice on the bottom wall of said cooling compartment; moisture evaporating means includ ing a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; a moisture collecting Well disposed beneath said refrigerant evaporator cooling element; said Well having an opening therein and an upstanding rim around said opening; conduit means for draining moisture from said well to said liquid container; and a cover member positioned over said upstanding rim, and having a portion thereof extending into intimate thermal contact with said defrost heater element whereby heat from said defrost heater during defrosting of said evaporator is effective for melting ice formations in the immediate vicinity of said upstanding rim and said cover.

l0. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart Vinner and outer shells fashioned to dene a food storage compartment and an air-cooling compartment with an access opening for each compartment; a closure member hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover the access opening of each of said compartments; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments and including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refrigerant-carrying conduits; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being disposed in said air-cooling compartment; a plu rality of air passageways communicating with each of said compartments; a plurality of food receptacles in said food storage compartment providing air bafe means that are cooperative with said inner shell to provide air duct means adjacent a wall of said inner shell and extending through said food storage compartment; a defrost heater element disposed so as to be in intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element and with a bottom wall of said air cooling compartment and operative to effect the defrosting of said evaporator cooling element and to melt formations of ice on the bottom wall of said cooling compartment; moisture evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with a portion of one of said refrigerant-,carrying conduits; a moisture collecting Well disposed beneath said refrigerant evaporator cooling element; said Well having an opening therein and an upstanding rim around said opening; lowheat conducting conduit means extending through a bottom wall of the cabinet and into the vicinity of said liquid container for draining moisture from said Well to said liquid container; and a cover member positioned over said upstanding rim, and having a portion thereof that extends into intimate thermal contact with said defrost heater whereby `heat therefrom during defrosting of said evaporator is effective for melting ice formations in the immediate vicinity of said upstanding rim and said cover.

ll. A `refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner and outer `shells fashioned to define a food storage compartment and an air-cooling compartment with an access opening for each compartment; a closure member fhingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover vthe access opening of each of said compartments; refrigeration apparatus operative to cool said compartments and including, Ia refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, land refrigerant-carrying conduits; said evaporator cooling element and said air circulating means being disposed in said lair-cooling compartment; a plurality of air passageways communicating with each of said compartments; a plurality of food receptacles in said food -storage compartment providing air braille mean-s that tare cooperative with said inner shell to provide |air duct means .adjacent a wall of said inner shell and extending through said food 'storage compartment; Ia defrost heater element disposed so las to be in intimate thermal contact with said evaporator cooling element 'and with a -bottom wall of said air cooling compartment `and operative to effect the defrosting of said evaporator cooling element and to heat the bottom wall of said air cooling compartment; moisture evaporati-ng means including ya liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with `a portion of one of said refrigerant-carrying conduits; a moisture collecting well disposed beneath said refrigerant evaporator cooling element; said well having yan opening therein and an upstanding rim around said opening; conduit means for draining moisture trom said well to said liquid container; ya cap member surmounting said upstanding rim; said cap being fashioned with a top vvall trom which depends 1an .annularly extending Wall having openings therein which latter wall extends into .said well; said cap additionally being provided `with an :arm of high-heat-conducting material which, when said cap is in position surmounting said opstanding rim, extends into intimate thermal contact with said defrost heater element whereby heat therefrom dur-ing defrosting of said evaporator is effective -for melting lice formations in the immediate vicinity of said opstanding rim and said cap.

12. A condensate disposal system for a refrigerator including a cabinet, air circulating means, and a refrigerant compressor, a condenser .and van evaporator with refrigerant-carrying conduits connected therebetween, heating means for defrosting said evaporator, a portion of said conduit connecting said compressor with said condenser being disposed in intimate heat exchange relation with a supporting plate member and disposed beneath the bottom wall of the cabinet, a liquid receptacle positioned in `a heat exchange relation on said supporting plate, a drain extending through the bottom wall of the cabinet opposite said liquid receptacle, a drain cap covering one end of said drain, said drain cap having a highly heat conductive portion thereon that extends into intimate heat exchange relation with said evaporator whereby heat from the evaporator upon defrosting thereof becomes operative to melt ice formed in the drain in the vicinity of said drain cap.

13. In :a refrigerated cabinet having Ia defrost heater elem-ent in intimate heat exchange relation with the evaporator cooling element of the refrigeration apparatus thereof, `a condensate disposal system, comprising: a liquid -receptacle disposed in intimate heat exchange relation with a portion of the refrigeration apparatus of the cabinet; a drain vfor collecting condensate from beneath the evaporator and discharging it into said liquid container; a cap covering one end of said drain; said cap having a highly heat conductive portion thereon disposed in good thermal and physical contact with the defrost heater element whereby heat therefrom upon defrosting of the evaporator is operative to melt ice formed in the drain in the vicinity of said drain cap.

14. In la refrigerated cab-inet the combination, comprising: spaced Iapart. inner and outer shells arranged to define a space divided by :a wall-like partition member into ya food storage compartment and an fair -cooling compartment; air-communication means between said compartments; refrigeration lapparatus operative to cool said compartments including, a refrigerant evaporator cooling element, air circulating means, and refrigerant-carrying conduits; said Ievaporator cooling element and said Iair circulating means being disposed remote trom 'said food storage compartment; la plurality .of food receptacles providing fair baille means ina vvall of each thereof, and having said air baille means coo erative with said inner shell to provid-e an Iair duct within said food storage comprartment; heating means for defrosting said evaporator; moisture evaporating means including a liquid container disposed in intimate thermal contact with ya portion of one of said lrefrigerant-carrying conduits; means :for draining moisture from said evaporator cooling element to said liquid container including, ya moisture collecting well disposed beneath said evapora-tor cooling element, and a drain pipe extending into said well `and discharging into said liquid container; and 1a cover member fashioned of good thermally conductive material overlying one end of said drain pipe, and having 1a portion thereof extending into physical contact with said evaporator cooling element whereby heat from said evaporator during defrosting thereof is effective for melting ice formations developed i-n the moisture collecting well in the vicinity of said covering member.

15. A refrigerated cabinet, comprising: spaced apart inner :and outer shells fashioned to define an upper and a lower compartment `adjacent thereto with access openings in each compartment; va closure member hingedly mounted on the cabinet and arranged to cover said 'access openings; refrigeration Iappanltus operative tor cooling the interior :of the cabinet; said Iapparatus including an evaporator cooling element 'and air circulating means disposed in said lower compartment; 1a first `air passageway between 'said compartments; a plurality of individual food storage -containers fashioned with at least one wall of each container imperforate and being disposed in vertically spaced relation in said upper compartment; said containers being further disposed so that at least one imperforate wall of each is vertically positioned and disposed in substantially the same plane so as to provide 'a baille-like wal'l having an opening therein between each such container; said baille-like wall being spaced 4from a proximate wall of said inner shell and cooperating therewith to form fair duct means extending from said iirst air passageway upwardly into the upper compartment and having said closure member spaced from the access opening of said lower compartment to provide a second lair passageway between said compartments which cooperates with said rst air passageway 'to effect the flow of Yair, forced by said `air circulating means into intimate heat exchange relation with said evaporator cooling element, successively in ia continuous circuit between and through each of said compartments.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2511126 *Sep 22, 1947Jun 13, 1950Nash Kelvinator CorpRefrigerating apparatus having adjustable partitions
US2532816 *Nov 16, 1949Dec 5, 1950Gen ElectricAir circulating arrangement for refrigerators
US2562057 *Oct 4, 1949Jul 24, 1951Avco Mfg CorpRefrigerator cabinet having means for regulating air flow and means for collecting drip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2912834 *Jan 8, 1957Nov 17, 1959Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2923135 *Nov 23, 1956Feb 2, 1960Gen Motors CorpOpen top refrigerator display case
US2937511 *Apr 2, 1956May 24, 1960Gen Motors CorpMultiple temperature refrigerating apparatus
US2959936 *Apr 1, 1958Nov 15, 1960Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2994209 *Feb 26, 1959Aug 1, 1961Gen Motors CorpFrostless refrigerator
US3038772 *Apr 28, 1960Jun 12, 1962Linde Eismasch AgArrangement for draining off the defrosting water in refrigerating containers, particularly refrigerator cabinets
US3050957 *Sep 26, 1960Aug 28, 1962Gen ElectricDefrost water drain seal
US3099914 *Dec 29, 1961Aug 6, 1963Gen ElectricRefrigerating apparatus
US3120111 *May 28, 1962Feb 4, 1964Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus with defrost means
US3169383 *Nov 25, 1958Feb 16, 1965Whirlpool CoRefrigerator with hollow cold shelf
US3314741 *Oct 13, 1965Apr 18, 1967Curtis Electro Lighting IncMedicine cabinet body
US3373578 *Jan 31, 1967Mar 19, 1968Fedders CorpCondensate drain tube
US3575011 *Feb 18, 1969Apr 13, 1971Whirlpool CoForced air freezer
US5269662 *Jul 14, 1992Dec 14, 1993Denton John WAircraft air conditioner compressor drive and mounting apparatus
US7651181 *Dec 4, 2003Jan 26, 2010Bsh Bosch Und Siemens Hausgeraete GmbhRefrigerator and door for a refrigerator
US7971444Jun 6, 2006Jul 5, 2011Itw Industrial Components S.R.L.Method and device for controlling the inside temperature of a refrigeration compartment, in particular of a refrigerator or freezer
US8028438 *Jun 30, 2005Oct 4, 2011Aqualizer, LlcMoisture condensation control system
US20120096887 *Jul 1, 2010Apr 26, 2012Lg Electronics Inc.Defrosting heater for refregerator and refregerator having the same
DE1243705B *Sep 8, 1960Jul 6, 1967Philco Ford CorpKuehlschrank
EP0016402A2 *Mar 12, 1980Oct 1, 1980Linde AktiengesellschaftRefrigerator
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/276, 62/505, 62/288, 62/267, 62/382, 62/377, 62/453, 62/419, 62/513, 62/279, 312/321.5, 62/509
International ClassificationF25D17/06, F25D25/02, F25D21/14, F25B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2317/062, F25D21/14, F25D2317/0683, F25D17/062, F25D2700/02, F25D2321/146, F25B31/006, F25D2317/0651, F25D25/024
European ClassificationF25B31/00C, F25D25/02C, F25D17/06A, F25D21/14