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Publication numberUS2768101 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1956
Filing dateOct 14, 1955
Priority dateOct 14, 1955
Publication numberUS 2768101 A, US 2768101A, US-A-2768101, US2768101 A, US2768101A
InventorsFairchild Bufkin R
Original AssigneeFairchild Bufkin R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for removing incrustation from a surface
US 2768101 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1956 B. R. FAIRCHILD 2,768,101

PROCESS FOR-REMOVING INCRUSTATION FROM A SURFACE,

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PROCESS FOR REMOVING, INCRUSTATION NFRQM A This invention relates to a crustation from a surface.

Various processes have been heretofore proposed for the removal of incrustations from surfaces, such as flooring or building walls made of masonry, stone, wood or like materials, by directing upon such surfaces either a stream of water heated to an elevated temperature, or a stream of water having admixed therewith an abrasive or detergent at ordinary or elevated temperatures, or a stream of water under pressure. All of such processes have the disadvantage in that the incrustation is removed only in parts. This is particularly true where the type of incrustation to be removed is either a bacterial growth, mildew, paint or a stain.

An object of the present invention is to provide a process for removing incrustation from a surface in which the removal is effected by forcibly playing a spread fan spray of water upon such surface.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a process for removing incrustation from a surface in which the removal is effected by playing a spread fan spray of water upon and in a direction perpendicular to such surface.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a process for removing incrustation from a surface in which the removal is effected by playing a spread fan sheet of water under high pressure and at ordinary temperature upon such surface.

Other objects and advantages of the process of the present invention will become apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspectiv view of a portion of a building being cleaned of the incrustation on the exterior face thereof by the process of the invention, the apparatus employed in carrying out of such process being diagrammatically shown.

Figure 2 is an enlarged front view of the device of the assembly of Figure 1 for forming the spread fan spray of water.

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on th line 3-3 of Figure 2.

With reference to the drawing, the numeral designates a building in which the exterior face 11 of the masonry wall has an incrustation 12 which is being removed by the process of the present invention, the numeral 13 indicating the portion of the face 11 from which the incrustation has been removed. The incrustation may either be mildew, paint, stain, a bacterial growth, or the like. A linear line spread fan spray of water 15 at ordinary temperature, but under a pressure of from 600 up to and not exceeding 1500 pounds per square inch, preferably substantially 1000 pounds per square inch, is caused to be played upon the incrustation 12. Such spread fan spray of water 15 is obtained by causing the water under the aforesaid pressure flowing into the conduit 16 from the pump 17 of the water supplying source indicated by the numeral 14 to flow through the spread process for removing infarm ng devis at th isch e and of to. The device .1 9 comprises a frusto- Bre lQZflfheesiZOsMch Figures 2 and is hat h s and; pa ed, .ut sills? nd ote from t i cha end 18 of the conduit 16 with the larger end 22 also ve c ll i s d and sn wdsntw rdl of n adi Qs t tattl aforsssiq dissha ss an the hea ,0 bein seeme to t e d rg n 1 Q the 991 d. Ailey m an o ssup is 2. The ad 20 a a bore 24 which extends inwardly from its larger end 22 to a point adjacent to the smaller end 21, the bore being in communication with the discharge end 18 of the conduit 16. Th head 20 is also provided in its lower portion with an arcuate slot 25, the slot extending perpendicularly through the head 20 adjacent the smaller end 21 thereof and tapering inwardly from the exterior of the head with its tapered end in communication with the bore 24. The water within the pressure range flows out of the discharge end 18 of the conduit 16 through the coupling 23 into the bore 24 of th head 20 and is discharged from the bore through the slot 25 in the form of the linear line spread fan spray 15.

Preferably, the spread fan spray emitting from the head 20 is so positioned that it is in a direction perpendicular to the exterior face 11 of the building 10, as shown in Figures 2 and 3. The linear line spread fan spray is advanced back and forth across the face 11 containing the incrustation until all of such incrustation has been detached from the face underneath and has been floated away. This results in the restoration of the face 11 to its original appearance with all traces of the incrustation removed.

While the invention has been described in connection with the removal of incrustation from a wall of a building, it is understood that masonry roofs may be cleaned in :a like manner.

For the removal of incrustation from asbestos shingle roofs, water of a pressure about 600 pounds per square inch for the formation of the spread fan sheet has been found to give satisfactory results. For houses having soft cement tile roofs and plaster side walls, water of a pressure of about 800 pounds per square inch should be employed for the formation of the spread fan spray. In the case of houses having hard cement tile roofs and side walls of 'hard cement, the water for the formation of the spread fan spray should be 1000 pounds per square inch, while in the case of houses fabricated of synthetic marble granite, natural stone or brick, the water for the formation of the spread fan spray should be about 1500 pounds per square inch.

This application isa continuation-in-part of now abandoned application Serial No. 340,118, filed March 3, 1953, Process for Removing Incrustation from a Surface.

Having thus described the invention what is new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A process for removing incrustation from surfaces of building structures which comprises playing upon said surfaces a linear line spread fan spray of water at ordinary temperature and under a pressure of from 600 up to and not exceeding 1500 pounds per square inch and causing said water spray to be moved back and forth across said surface until all of the incrustation has been detached therefrom and floated away.

2. A process for removing incrustation from surfaces of building structures which comprises playing upon said surfaces a linear line spread fan spray of water at ordinary temperature and under a pressure of from 600 up to and not exceeding 1500 pounds per square inch and in a direction perpendicular to said surface and causing said water spray to be moved back and forth across said surface while maintaining the spray in the aforesaid direction 2,768,101 li teated Qct- 23,71, 56

m ls ad-z is er c l d s s with respect to said surface until all of the incrustation surfaces a linear'line spread fan-spray of water; at ordi-' nary temperature and under a-pressure 'of substantially 1000 pounds per square inch and causing said water spray to be moved back and forth across saidsurface until all of the incrustation has been detached therefrom and floated away.

4. A process for removing incrustation from surfaces of building structures which comprises playing upon said surfaces a linear line spread fan spray of water at ordinary temperature and under a pressure of substantially pounds per square inch and in a direction perpendicular to said surface and'causing saidwater spray to'be moved back and forth across said surface while maintaining the spray in the aforesaiddirection with respect to said surface until all of the incrustation has been detached therefrom and floated away.

References Cited in the' -file of this patent UIIFIEI) STATES PATENTS Edv 5ids';; Feb. 22, 1944 OTHER REFERENCES j Moore: How to Clean Everything, page I 106, Simon &Schuster, N. Y., IN

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2342533 *Jan 21, 1942Feb 22, 1944Weyerhaeuser Timber CoMethod of removing bark from logs
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3049302 *Mar 18, 1960Aug 14, 1962Homestead Valve Mfg CoDual phase spray generator
US3062456 *Feb 25, 1960Nov 6, 1962Union Carbide CorpWater nozzle
US3196888 *May 6, 1963Jul 27, 1965Rousseau Leo JAutomatic vehicle washing machine
US3505112 *Sep 5, 1967Apr 7, 1970Kettler Roddy EMethod of cleaning masonry
US3819400 *Oct 19, 1971Jun 25, 1974Dynamit Nobel AgSurface protection of porous materials
US3829019 *Feb 2, 1972Aug 13, 1974Chaska Chem Co IncSpinner assembly
US3895957 *Apr 23, 1973Jul 22, 1975Luthe WolfgangMethod for cleansing surfaces of buildings and passage-ways
US4158575 *Apr 11, 1977Jun 19, 1979Purex CorporationCleaning and disinfecting hard surfaces
US4249956 *Aug 1, 1979Feb 10, 1981Hartman Charles NMethod of removing paint from a brick surface
US4320072 *Feb 27, 1981Mar 16, 1982Ecodyne CorporationRestricted spray pattern
US4337784 *May 1, 1980Jul 6, 1982N L B Corp.Method for cleaning floor surfaces with high pressure water jets
US4342796 *Sep 10, 1980Aug 3, 1982Advanced Chemical Technologies, Inc.Method for inhibiting corrosion of internal structural members of reinforced concrete
US4443271 *Apr 28, 1982Apr 17, 1984Nlb Corp.Removal paints, impingement
US4874435 *Dec 28, 1987Oct 17, 1989Caracciolo Louis DOzonization of containers
US5849099 *Mar 19, 1996Dec 15, 1998Mcguire; DennisMethod for removing coatings from the hulls of vessels using ultra-high pressure water
DE102007060151A1 *Dec 13, 2007Jan 15, 2009Andreas HarnackeMobile cleaning plant e.g. for steep roofs, has high pressure device, output of pressurized pipe is connected at free end with pressure gun and connected to input
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/34, 134/38, 239/598, 134/174, 239/1
International ClassificationB05B1/02, B08B3/02, B05B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB08B3/028, B05B1/046
European ClassificationB05B1/04H, B08B3/02H2