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Publication numberUS2768510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1956
Filing dateAug 7, 1953
Priority dateAug 7, 1953
Publication numberUS 2768510 A, US 2768510A, US-A-2768510, US2768510 A, US2768510A
InventorsGraham S Mccloy
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plural temperature refrigeration apparatus
US 2768510 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. s. M CLOY 2,768,510

PLURAL. TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Oct. 30, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 7, 1953 INVENTOR GRAHAM 5. MC GLOY BY W.

AT ORNEY G. s. MCCLOY 2,768,510

PLURAL TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Oct. 30, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 7, 1953 FIG.2.

INVENTOR GRAHAM s. mg CLOY r ATTORNEY G. s. MCCLOY 2,768,510

PLURAL TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Oct. 3Q, 1956 Filed Aug. 7, 1953 4 Shets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR GRAHAM S.MCCLOY ATTORNEY s. s. M CLOY 2,768,510

PLURAL TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Oct. 30, 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 7, 1953 II ll ll INVENTOR GRAHAM 5- MC CLOY FIG.8. MP

ATTORNEY the two chambers.

United States Patent PLURAL TEMPERATURE REFRIGERATION APPARATUS Graham S. McCloy, Springfield, Mass., assignor to Westinghouse Electric Corporation, East Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application August 7, 1953, Serial No. 372,956 16 Claims. c1. 62-1113 the structure of the partition andapparatus associated therewith for controlling flow of air within the chambers "to establish-and maintain various temperature conditions in specific portions of the refrigerator for the proper 'storageof different foods.

In a domestic refrigerator of the above-mentioned type,

-'it has been found desirable to maintain a. substantial temperature differential between the freezing chamber and the higher temperature food storage chamber. This differ'entiaI is of the order of 40 Fahrenheit, with the freezingchamber being maintained at approximately0 'F. and the food storage chamber at approximately 40 F.

With this large temperature differential existing between I the two chambers and the higher temperature'food 'storage chamber being refrigerated by convectional -air flow between the chambers, it is essential that accurate control he maintained over this air flow to prevent the food storage charnber from becoming too cold. Furthermore, it is desirable to separate the two chambers by means of a heat insulating partition to prevent the transfer of'heat between the compartments through the partition arid to rely entirely upon the air controlling means tomaintain the proper temperature within the food storagev chamber.

Previously, two chamber refrigerators have been 'constructed with the edges of the partition member spaced from two or more of the vertical walls of the insulated cabinet to provide passages for the flow of air between Generally, one or more of these passages provided a path for warm air to rise from-the food storage chamber into the freezing chambers, where the air-'was cooled by the cooling unit positioned therein and permittedto returnto the food storage'chamber by way of a further passage. It has likewise been proposed that the air flow between the'chambers be controlled by means of a damper positioned within the return air-passage.

While'such arrangements have'proven satisfactory in the past, I have-discovered that effective control is not maintained over the temperature in the food storage chamber when the temperature differential between the two chambers is increased to the present day requirements mentioned previously. For example, I have'foundin'refrigerators employing a plurality of air paths betweencha'mbus that, even though the damper in the returnair. passage is completely closed, it is possible for 'suflicient air-to circulate "through the remainingpassages to coolthe food storage chamber to an undesirably lowtempe'rature.

It is, therefore, an object of my invention to effectively and accurately control the'flow of air between the cham- 'out of the two chambers.

adjacent side wall of the cabinet.

2,768,510 *Patented Oct. 30, 1956 bers of a two temperature refrigerator in which one chamber is refrigerated entirely by convectional air flow.

A feature of my invention which permits accomplishment of the above-mentioned object resides in using a single damper to control the flow of air both into and I provide an insulated partition member between the chambers which is so constructed as to be sealed against all but one-side wall of the refrigerator cabinet, thereby providing a single air flow passage between one edge of the partition and the This partition member is so constructed as to direct the cold air falling from the cooling unit in the freezing chamber through a portion only of the air passage into the food storage chamher and to permit the warm air rising out of the food storage chamber to flow through the remainder of this same air passage. Then, by positioning the damper within this one air passage, it is possible to control accurately the flow of air in both directions between the chambers or shut oif the air flow entirely if required.

Another object of my invention is to effect the' flow of air through a predetermined path within a domestic refrigerator bymeans of a partition member of novelconstruction.

A further object of my invention is to provide a novel partition member for two temperature refrigerators.

It is common practice in present day domestic refrigerators to provide separate compartments within the high temperature food storage chamber for'the storage of-specific types of food at different temperatures than the average temperature maintained within the food storage chamher. One such compartment is generally provided for vide 'multi-temperature cooling withina' domestic refrigerator for the preservation of different types'of foods.

Another and 'more specific object of my invention is to provide novelmeans for cooling a meat storage compartment of a domestic refrigerator.

A further object of my invention isto provide an arrangement for rapidly cooling bottled beverages within a domestic refrigerator.

These and otherobjects are effected by the invention as will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming-a part of this application, in which:

Fig. l is a sectional view from one side of a refrigerator embodying my invention;

'Fig. 2 is a-section'al view from the front of the refrigerator shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. '3 is a horizontal, sectional view of the refrigerator, taken along the line ill-J11 of Fig.1;

Fig. 4 is an enlargement of a portion of Fig. 2 showing my improved partition member, but with 'the air flow control damper in its closed position;

Fig. 5 is an enlargement of a portion of Fig, 1 showing my improved partition member but with the air flow control damper in its closed position;

Fig. 6 is a sectional, perspective view of the upper portion of the refrigerator taken along the line VI-VI ofFig. l with parts thereof broken away to show'my improved air flow directing arrangement;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view showing the upper surface of my improved partition member; and

Fig-8 is a perspective view of an air fiow'deflecting tray employed in my invention.

Referring to the drawings wherein I'have shown my invention as applied to a domestic refrigerator, the numeral 10 designates generally an insulated refrigerator cabinet having a top wall 11, a bottom wall 12, side walls 13 and 14 and a back wall 15. Closure means are provided for the front of the cabinet consisting of an upper door 16 and a lower door 17, the edges of which seat against the front edges of the top, bottom and side walls of the cabinet 10. A mullion 18 extends across the open front of the cabinet 10 for sealing engagement with the meeting edges of the upper and lower doors 16 and 17.

An uninsulated machinery compartment 19 is provided in the lower portion of the refrigerator cabinet 10 for housing a motor compressor unit 20 of a mechanical refrigerating machine. A plate type condenser 21 of the refrigerating machinery is shown attached to the rear wall 15 of the cabinet 10. No detailed description of the refrigerating machinery is deemed necessary here inasmuch as the construction and operation of such systems are well known in the art. The mechanism shown is for the purpose of illustration only and any suitable refrigeration machinery may be employed in the refrigerator embodying my invention.

The refrigerated space within the insulated cabinet 10 is divided by an insulated partition member 22 into an upper freezing chamber 23 and a lower food storage chamber 24. The upper freezing chamber 23 houses a cooling unit 26, which preferably takes the form of a refrigerant evaporator operatively connected to the motor compressor unit 20 and the condenser 21 of a con ventional mechanical refrigerating circuit.

Suitable control means (not shown) are provided for cycling the motor compressor unit 20 to maintain a substantially constant temperature of approximately F. within the freezing chamber 23. The cooling unit 26 is spaced from the top wall 11, the side walls 13 and 14 and the back wall 15 of the refrigerator cabinet and from the partition member 22 to permit air to circulate around and to be cooled by the cooling unit 26 for a purpose which will hereinafter be described.

The lower food storage chamber 24 is constructed to accommodate the storage of food at an average temperature of approximately 40 F. and has a number of ordinary wire shelves 27 disposed therein. Since it is desirable to store different types of food at temperatures other than the average temperature maintained in the food storage chamber 24, the chamber is also provided with a number of separate storage containers, such as, the meat storage container 28, the bottle beverage container 29 and the vegetable storage pans 31.

The partition member 22 is positioned beneath the cooling unit 26 and arranged to catch the cold air falling from around the cooling unit and direct this air along a predetermined path into the food storage chamber 24. The partition member 22 is supported and sealed to the cabinet 10 at its front edge 32 by means of a lip 33, which rests on a lip 34 on the back of the mullion 18. Suitable means (not shown), are also provided for holding the side edges 36 and 37 of partition 22 in sealing engagement with the under surface of flange members 38 and 39 attached to the side walls 13 and 14. In accordance with my invention, the rear edge 41 of partition member 22 extends beyond the rear of the rear end of cooling unit 26 to insure that cold air falling off of the back of the cooling unit will be caught, but is spaced from the rear wall of the cabinet 10 to provide a passage 42 establishing communication between the freezing chamber 23 and the food chamber 24. Air falling from the sides of the cooling unit is directed onto partition 22 by the sloping upper surface of flange members 38 and 39 as shown in Fig. 4. The upper surface of mullion 18 is likewise sloped to direct cold air from the cooling unit 26 onto partition 22.

In accordance with my invention, and as best shown in Fig. 4, the partition member 22 is provided with a.

top surface 43 having a compound slope downwardly in the direction of the rear wall 15 and one side wall 14- of the cabinet 10. When the refrigerator is viewed from the front, as shown in Fig. 2, the slope of the upper surface 43 of partition member 22 is downwardly in the direction of the right-hand rear corner of the cabinet. It can readily be seen that air cooled by the cooling unit 26 in the freezing chamber 23 and falling onto the upper surface 43 of the partition member 22 will be directed toward one end of the air passage 42. To further insure that cooled air falling onto the partition member 22 follows the above-mentioned flow path, an upstanding wall 44 is provided around the periphery of partition member 22. The wall 44 has a cut-away portion 46 at the right-hand half of the partition rear edge 41 to provide an opening for the flow of cooled air off of the partition member and into the right-hand end of the air passage 42.

The cooled air falling through the right-hand end of air passage 42 passes into the lower food storage chamber 24 to cool the contents of the chamber. This air passing over the food stuffs in the chamber 24 is warmed and rises into the upper portion of chamber 24, from whence it flows through the left-hand end of air passage 42 into the space surrounding the cooling unit 26 in the upper freezing chamber 23. The air, in circulating around the cooling unit 26, is cooled thereby and again falls onto the upper surface 43 of partition member 22 to commence another circuit through the cabinet 10. By means of this convectional flow of air between the freezing chamber 23 and the food storage chamber 24, the latter is refrigerated.

I control the temperature within the lower food storage chamber 24 by regulating the convectional flow of air through the air passage 42. For this purpose a movable damper 49 is supported within air passage 42 by means of brackets 51 attached to the back wall 15. Damper 49 extends the full length of air passage 42 and is sutficiently wide to substantially completely block passage 42 when tilted to its closed position, as shown in Fig. 5. Stated differently, the damper 49 may be said to be substantially coextensive in size with the air passage 42.

Movement of the damper 49 is effected by a thermostatic control element, generally indicated at 52, responsive to the temperature of the air in food storage chamber 24. The particular thermostatic control 52 forms no part of my invention but is more fully described and claimed in the co-pending application of Leslie B. M. Buchanan, Serial No. 320,568, filed November 14, 1952, now Patent No. 2,742,766, dated April 24, 1956, and assigned to the assignee of my invention. In general, the function of the thermostatic control 52 is to move the damper 49 to its closed position, as shown in Fig. 5, thereby reducing the convectional flow of air between chambers 23 and 24, when no cooling is required in the food storage chamber 24. Conversely, when the temperature within food storage chamber 24 rises, either because warm food is placed therein or the temperature ambient the refrigerator increases, the thermostatic control 52 moves the damper 49 to its open position, as is shown in Fig. 1, permitting an increased amount of cold air to flow from the freezing chamber 23 into the food storage chamber 24. Since the damper 49 extends the full length of the air passage 42, it controls not only the cold air flowing from freezing chamber 23 into food storage chamber 24, but likewise controls the return flow of warm air from food storage chamber 24 into the freezing chamber 23. By this arrangement, I provide a positive and accurate means for controlling the fiow of air between the two chambers and for maintaining the desired temperature within the food storage chamber 24.

The majority of non-frozen food stuffs may be safely stored within food storage chamber 24 at the average temperature of approximately 40 F. maintained within the chamber. Fresh meat, however, is best preserved at -lower-the temperature of the'tne'at stored therein.

access to its interior. provided with an extension 67 projecting above the top of the container 28 to form a decorative coverfor the front end of the pan 62.

a somewhat lower temperature,- preferably slightly 1 above freezing. I, therefore-provide -an arrangement fondirec'tingthe cold air flowing from the freezingchamber '23 into contact with the meat storage container 28 to The structure for accomplishing this purpose is best shown in Figs. 4 through 8 and includes a pair of brackets 53 and 54 attached to the underside of partition member 22 adjacent the right-hand end thereof. The brackets'53 and 54 are'shaped to forma firstpair of glide channels 56 and 57 at their lower edge and'a second pair of glide channels 58 and 59 above thefirst pairof channels. The meat storage container 28 consists of a relatively deep,

open top pan having flanges 61"formed from the sides thereof adjacent the top. These'fla'nges 61 are slidably received in'the'lower pair of glide channels 56 and 57 of brackets 53 and 54. The top of the meat storage container 28 is closed by an elongated pan 62 which rests 'in the upper pair of glide channels 58 and 59 and extends substantially to the rear wall 15 of the cabinet 10. As shown in Fig. 5, the pan 62 extends-into the path of the cold air flowing downwardly through one end of air passage 42 and is sufliciently wide to catch all of'the cold air spilling through the cut-out portion 46 of the partition wall 44. All of the cold air passing from freezing chamber '23 into air passage 42 is, therefore, directed forward in pan 62 and over the top of the meat storage container *28, cooling the contents thereof.

One wall of the pan 62 is provided with a cut-out portion 63 in registry with an opening 64 in bracket 54 to permit the escape of cold "air down along side wall 14 of the cabinet and into the remainder-of the food storage chamber 24.

'The meat storage container-28 has a handle attached to'the front thereof to facilitate sliding the container forward along glide channels 56 and 57 to gain The handle 66 may, if desired, be

It will be noted that the pan62 slidably rests on glide channels 58 and 59 and may be easily moved forward and-removed for cleaning when necessary.

The cool air leaving pan 62 and falling down side wall 14 of the cabinet '10 has been warmed somewhat by its passage in proximity to the meat storage container 28. Its temperature, however, is still somewhatbelow 14, as Well as the warmer air displaced from bottle container 29 by the cold air flowing into the container29, continues along the path indicated generally by the arrows in the drawing throughout the remainder of the food storage chamber 24, cooling the contentsthe'reof.

As the air circulates through chamber 24 it is warmed 'and, becoming lighter, rises into the upper region of chamber 24. This warmer air then passes upwardly through the left hand end of air passage 42 at a rate determined by the position of the movable damper 49 in the air passage 42. Upon entering the freezing chamber 23, this warmer air flows through the space between the cooiing unit 26 and the cabinet walls 11, 13, 14 and 15. Being cooled by contact with the walls of the cooling unit 26, the air becomes heavier and falls down onto "the upper surface of partition member 22 which'directs the, now cooled, air into the right hand end of air passage '42 for'return to the food storage chamber 24.

From the foregoing, it willbe apparent that'the partitionmember 22,When constructed and arranged within "ar'efrigerator cabinet, in 'accorda'ncewith my invention,

is capable of directing air flowing between chambers 23 and' 24 along a predetermined path. It will further be seen that my novel partition member permitsa single movable damper 49 to positively control the flow of air between the chambers and thereby accurately regulate the temperature within the lower or food storage chamber.

It is also evident that'my invention provides novel and effective means formaintaining a meat storage container at the. proper temperature for the storage of fresh'meat. It will likewise appear that my invention includes the use of a deep walled container disposed within the path of cold air flow for storing and quickly cooling bottled beverag'es.

While I'have shown my invention in but one form, it will be obvious 'to those skilled in the art that it is-not so limited, but is susceptible of'v'arious other chang'esand modifications without departing from the spiritthereof.

tition in said refrigerator dividing it into upper and lower food storage chambers, said partition having the rear 'edge thereof spaced from the rear wall of the refrigerator "to form passage means for the flow of 'air between said 'upper and lower chambers, aid passage means constituting the'sole means of communication between said upper and lower chambers, and a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber, the upper surface of said partition being sloped'to direct the air cooled by said cooling'unit toward a portion only of said air passage means, whereby the warm air from said lower chamber is permitted to flow upwardly through the remainder of said passage means.

2. A refrigerator as defined by claim 1 including movable damper means positioned Within said air passage means and being substantially coextensivein size therewith for controlling the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers.

3. A refrigerator comprising insulated side, top and bottom 'walls, one of said side walls including closure means permitting access to the interior of said refrigerator, a partition'member disposed within said refrigerator and dividing it into upper and lower food storage chambers, said partition member having one edge thereof spaced from its adjacent side Wall to form air passage means connecting said upper end lower chambers, said passage means constituting the sole means of communication between said upper and lower chambers, and" a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber, the upper surface of said partition member being sloped to direct the air cooled by said cooling unit toward a portion only of said air passage means, whereby the warm air from said lower chamber is permitted to flow upwardly through the remainder of said passage means.

4. A refrigerator as defined by claim 3 including movable damper means positioned within said air passage means and being substantially coextensive in size therewith for controlling the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers.

5. A refrigerator comprising insulated side, rear, top

and bottom walls and insulated closure means forming the site slope downwardly in the direction of one side wall and the rear wall of the refrigerator for directing the air said lower chamber to said upper chamber is permitted to flow through the other end of said air passage.

6. A refrigerator as defined by claim 5 including a movable damper positioned within said air passage and being substantially coextensive in size therewith for controlling the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers.

7. A partition member for dividing a refrigerator cabinet into upper and lower food storage chambers and for directing the flow of air between said chambers, said member being characterized by a generally rectangular upper surface sloping downwardly in the direction of one of the corners thereof and vertical side walls extending upwardly from the periphery thereof and terminating in a substantially horizontal plane adjacent the uppermost corner of the sloping surface, one of said side walls having an opening at one end thereof adjacent the lowermost corner of the member.

8. The combination with a refrigerated cabinet structure of an insulated partition member dividing said cabinet into high and low temperature food storage chambers, a container supported on the high temperature side of said insulated partition and adapted to store foods at a temperature lower than the average temperature within said high temperature chamber, said container having one Wall thereof arranged adjacent to but spaced from the high temperature side of said partition and means for directing cold air from the low temperature chamber to the space between the said one wall of the container and the partition to lower the temperature within the container.

9. A partition assembly .for dividing a refrigerated cabinet into high and low temperature food storage chambers, said assembly comprising a heat insulated partition member adapted to be mounted in a generally horizontal position, a container disposed beneath said partition member and within said high temperature compartment, said container being adapted for the storage of food at a temperature below the average temperature within said high temperature compartment, the top surface of said container being spaced from the under surface of said partition member, and means for directing cold air from above said partition through the space between said partition and the top surface of the container.

10. In a refrigerator, the combination of a cabinet structure comprising insulated side, rear, top and bottom walls and insulated closure means forming the front wall the rear edge thereof spaced from the rear wall of the cabinet structure to form a passage for the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers, a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber for maintaining a relatively low temperature therein, said lower chamber being maintained at a relatively higher temperature by the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers through said air passage, a container supported beneath said partition for the storage of foods at a temperature below the temperature maintained within said lower compartment, said container having the upper wall thereof spaced from said partition, and means for directing cold air flowing from said upper chamber to said lower chamber through the space between the container and said partition.

11. In a refrigerator, the combination of cabinet structure comprising insulated side, rear, top and bottom walls, one of said side walls including closure means permitting access to the interior of said refrigerator, a heat insulating partition member within said cabinet structure dividing it into upper and lower food storage chambers, said partition member having one edge thereof spaced from its adjacent cabinet side wall to form an air passage connecting said upper and lower compartments, a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber for maintaining a relatively low temperature therein, said lower chamber being maintained at a relatively higher temperature by the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers through said air passage, a container supported beneath said partition for the storage of foods at a temperature below the average temperature maintained within said lower chamber, said container having the upper wall thereof arranged adjacent but spaced from said partition, and means for directing cold air flowing from said upper chamber to said lower chamber through the space between the container and said partition.

12. The combination with a refrigerator comprising a refrigerated cabinet structure, a heat insulating partition member dividing said cabinet structure into upper and lower food storage chambers, and a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber to cool the media therein, said partition having one edge thereof spaced from the adjacent side wall of said cabinet structure to permit cold air to flow from said upper compartment over said edge into the lower chamber to effect cooling of said lower chamber, of a container disposed within said lower chamber and adapted to store foods at a temperature lower than the average temperature maintained within said lower chamber, said container having the upper wall thereof arranged adjacent but spaced from said partition member, and means for directing cold air flowing over said one edge of the partition member through the space between said partition member and the upper wall of said container to cool the contents of said container.

13. In a refrigerator, the combination of an insulated cabinet, a heat insulating partition in said cabinet dividing it into upper and lower food storage chambers, said partition being spaced from one of the walls of said cabinet to provide a passage for the fiow of air between said upper and lower chambers, a cooling unit disposed within the upper chamber for maintaining a relatively low temperature therein and for maintaining a relatively higher temperature within said lower chamber by convcctional flow of air through said passage, a removable open top container disposed within aid lower compartment and adapted to store foods at a temperature lower than the average temperature maintained within said lower compartment, means for supporting said container with the top edge thereof adjacent but spaced from said partition and an open top tray disposed within the space between said container and the partition, said tray having one edge thereof extending into the path of cold air flowing through said passage from said upper chamber for directing said air over the top of said container, said tray having an opening in the side wall of another edge thereof for perigiitting the escape of said cold air into said lower cham- 14. The combination with a refrigerated cabinet structure, of an insulated partition member dividing said cabinet into high and low temperature food storage chambers, first and second containers disposed within the high temperature storage chamber and adapted to store foods at temperatures lower than the average temperature within said chamber, said first container having one wall thereof arranged adjacent but spaced from the high temperature side of said partition and means for directing cold air from the low temperature chamber through the space between the said one wall of the first container and the partition to lower the temperature within the first container, said second container comprising an open-top vessel arranged to catch at least a portion of the cold air issuing from said space.

15. A refrigerator comprising insulated side, top and bottom walls, one of said side walls including closure means permitting access to the interior of said refrigerator, a partition member disposed within said refrigerator and dividing it into upper and lower food storage cham bers, said partition member having one edge thereof spaced from its adjacent side wall to form air passage means connecting said upper and lower chambers, said air passage means constituting the sole means of communication between said upper and lower chambers, and a cooling unit disposed within said upper chamber, said partition member having vertical imperforate side walls extending upwardly from the periphery thereof for retaining cold air falling onto said partition member from said cooling unit, the one side wall of said partition member which is adjacent'said air passage meansbeing provided with means adjacent one end thereof for permitting cold air to flow off of said partition member into one end of said air passage means, whereby the warm air from said lower chamber is permitted to flow upwardly through the remainder of said air passage means.

16. A refrigerator as defined by claim 15 including a movable damper positioned within said air passage means and being substantially coextensive in size therewith for controlling the flow of air between said upper and lower chambers.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,099,409 Philipp Nov. 16, 1937 2,292,032 Atchison Aug. 4, 1942 2,375,359 Hedlund May 8, 1945 2,450,305 Shoemaker Sept. 28, 1948 2,509,613 Philipp May 30, 1950 2,510,758 Rundell June 6, 1950 2,511,126 Philipp June 13, 1950 2,581,618 Anderson Jan. 8, 1952 2,592,394 Cochran Apr. 8, 1952 2,613,510 Morton Oct. 14, 1952 2,633,003 Jordan Mar. 31, 1953 2,720,089 Morton Oct. 11. 1955

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4729613 *Nov 13, 1986Mar 8, 1988General Electric CompanyHousehold refrigerator pan assembly
US5675981 *Sep 25, 1996Oct 14, 1997Daewoo Electronics Co., Ltd.Cool air regulator structure of a refrigerator
DE1073510B * Title not available
DE1098017B *Nov 11, 1957Jan 26, 1961Hyresgaesternas Sparkasseoch BKuehlschrank mit einem Verdampfer und zwei voneinander getrennten Abteilungen mit voneinander abweichenden Temperaturen
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/408, 62/187
International ClassificationF25D11/02, F25D17/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2317/061, F25D17/065, F25D2400/04, F25D11/02, F25D2317/0653
European ClassificationF25D11/02, F25D17/06A1