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Publication numberUS2769600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1956
Filing dateJul 16, 1952
Priority dateJul 16, 1952
Publication numberUS 2769600 A, US 2769600A, US-A-2769600, US2769600 A, US2769600A
InventorsNystrand Ernst Daniel, Edwin M Kwitek
Original AssigneePaper Converting Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Web winding machine
US 2769600 A
Images(12)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1956 E. M. KWITEK EI'AL- WEB WINDING MACHINE 12 sheets-sheet 1 Filed July 16. 1952 a .w m w.

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Nov. 6, 1956 E. M. KwlTEK ETAL WEB WINDING MACHINE Filed July 16, 1952 12 Sheets-Sheet 12 INVENTORS: aid 15h W M BY M ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent WEB WINDING MACHINE Edwin M. Kwitek and Ernst Daniel Nystrand, Green Bay, Wis., assignors to Paper Converting Machine Co., Inc., Green Bay, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application July 16, 1952, Serial No. 299,108 Claims. (Cl. 24256) This invention relates to a web rewinding machine, and more particularly to a multiple stage core cutting and web rewinding machine wherein core lengths are fed into the machine, cut into individual cores or segments, wound with a web such as paper, and then removed from the machine.

An object of the invention is to provide a multiple stage core cutting and web rewinding machine wherein core lengths are received upon core shafts fixed in the machine, cut into individual cores or segments of desired lengths, and subsequently wound with a slit web, the wound cores being then stripped from the machine automatically. Another object of the invention is to provide a multiple stage machine of the class described in which a core is being cut into segments of desired length at one station While simultaneously a web is being wound upon another core at a second station, and at the same time a core having a web wound thereon is being stripped automatically from the machine at still another station. Still another object is to provide a web windin g machine in which a plurality of core shafts are carried by a member intermittently driven whereby the core shafts are transferred from one station to another and are held at each station for a predetermined time whilethe various operations are being performed.

A further object of the invention is to provide a machine in which the driving mechanism is quickly and easily retimed so that upon breakage of the web during the winding operation, the machine need not continue to operate through its preset cycle before another core shaft may be moved to web winding position and there have a complete length of web wound thereon. A still further object of the invention is to provide in a web rewinding machine a stripping means that is automatically actuated when a wound core is moved to core stripping position to strip the wound core from the core shaft, and which is automatically deactuated after each wound core is stripped from the machine. Yet another object is to provide retractible shaft supporting arms which engage the core shafts during certain of the operations while retracting from engagement with the shafts during the core stripping and core insertion operations. It is a still further object of the invention to provide a means for placing a static charge upon the severed tail of the rewound webbing whereby the tail clings firmly to the wound core and the use of adhesives, etc., for this purpose is eliminated. Still another object is to provide core cutting knives or disks that are pivotally mounted to permit movement of the cores into and out of the core cutting static A further object of the invention is to provide a core cutting and web rewinding machine having rapid movement while performing accurate operations, whereby a very large number of Wound cores are delivered by the machine in a very short period of time and in an accurately wound condition to provide a neat appearing article. Further objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the specification proceeds.

Our invention may best be understood by referring to the drawings, which illustrate a preferred embodiment of our invention, and in which- Figure 1 is a perspective view of the web rewinding machine embodying our invention; Fig. 2, a similar perspective view taken from the opposite end of the machine; Fig. 3, a side view taken from a point inwardly of the right end frame or wall of the machine looking toward the left, and in which parts of the apparatus are shown in section; Fig. 4, a side view taken from a point inwardly of the left end frame or wall, as indicated by the line 4-4 of Fig. 7; Fig. 5, an enlarged, detailed side view of the turret and mandrels and core cutting knives taken from a point inwardly of the right end frame or wall of the machine looking toward the left, and in which parts .of the apparatus are shown in section; Fig. 6, a diagrammatic view of the shafts and driving mechanism shown stripped from the machine; Fig. 7, a cross-sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 5; Fig. 8, an enlarged crosssectional view of the retractible mandrel support arms; Fig. 9, an enlarged cross-sectional view of the timing gear assembly looking toward the rear of the machine and taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. 4; Fig. 10, a fragmentary perspective view of the web severing knife and actuating mechanism; Fig. 11, a fragmentary view showing a detailed cross section of the web severing knife; Fig. 12, a side elevational view of the switch arrangement and actuating arm for triggering the web severing knife and the core stripping mechanism; Fig. 13, a front end view of the structure shown in Fig. 12 and in which the turret driving member is included; Fig. 14, a broken perspective view of the core cutting knives; Fig. 15, an exploded perspective view showing an individual core cutting knife assembly in spaced-apart relationship; Fig. 16, a detailed cross-sectional view of a Web slitting knife or disk received within a mating groove provided in the secondary bed roll; and Fig. 17, a perspective view of the mechanism for Withdrawing the web slitting knives from engagement with the bed roll and in which the parts are shown in spaced-apart relationship.

The perspective views shown in Figs. *1 and 2 indicate the general structure of our multiple stage core cutting and web rewinding machine and locate the relative positions of the individual parts, etc., comprising the machine. Referring .to these figures, the various parts are shown mounted upon a frame A having a left end wall B and a right end wall C. The end walls or frames B and C are connected rigidly at the bottom by cross spacers D and at the top by two additional spacer Suspended from the upper tubing E are the mandrel assembly F, the mandrel driving assembly G, and the core cutters H. Mounted adjacent the lowermost mandrel is a core stripping mechanism J. A clutch and driving assembly is indicated by the letter K and the gear train and anism is indicated generally by the letter L. The roller assembly over which the Web passes is indicated by the letter M.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, aparent or mill roll 10 having a shaft 11 extending therethrough is supported by a pair of spaced brackets 12 each having an elongated slot 13 therein. The brackets in turn are supported upon a base or floor by a suitable supporting structure 14 which may be removably secured to the end frames by bolts, etc. The ends of the shaft 11 are received Within the slots 13 which permit movement of the shaft within the slots as the web is removed from the parent roll and the size of the roll is thereby decreased. The slots 13 extend downwardly as well as outwardly and the forces of gravity acting upon the parent or mill roll 10 cause it to move downwardly in the slots 13 until movement is arrested by some intercepting member. A web 15 is shown as it is being delivered from the parent roll 10, and the web, which is wound upon the periphery of the parent roll 10, frictionally engages a delivery roller 16 that is journalled upon suitable bearings in the shaft driving mechsupporting brackets 14. The delivery roller 16 is driven I through a suitable belting arrangement which will be later described. The parent roll may also be equipped with a gearing mechanism permitting lateral adjustment of the roll for purposes of aligning the web, etc.

The web is drawn upwardly over an idler roller 17 which is freely rotatable upon a bracket 18 secured to the end frames or walls B and C of the machine. The web 15 is then drawn upwardly and passes over another idler roller 19 which is journalled upon suitable bearings within the end frames or walls of the apparatus. 7

The idler roller 17 takes up any slack in the web 15 while the idler roller 19 is used to change the direction of the web. The web 15 then passes under a felt-covered feed or pull roller 20 which is driven through a gear train that will be later described. The web passes between the feed roller 20 and a secondary perforator roll 21, which is also driven, and then between the secondary perforator roll 21 and a perforator roll 22. The perforator roll 22 is equipped with a plurality of spaced perforating knives 23 that coact with recesses 24 in the secondary perforator roll to perforate or otherwise mark of axially-spaced cutting knives or disks 46 engage the core and cut it into predetermined lengths. For example, at this station a core length may be cut into in- .dividual cores or core segments upon which rolls of toilet paper are wound. The turret again rotates through an arcuate distance to the station c. No operation is performed upon the core at this stat1on. The turret again rotates and in passing to the station d the cores are swept over a plurality of spaced glue applicator rollers or wheels 47 which apply a narrow band or ring of 'glue or adhesive to the individual core' segments. From station d the rotation of the turret 44' moves the core, to which glue has now been applied, into the web. winding station 2. In moving from station d to the web winding station e, the core shaft engages the driving belt 48 while intermediate the two stations and is caused to rotate. Before reaching station e the core and core, shaft approach closely the bed roll 28'and are, at thistime, rotating at full speed and the proper speed 'fortpicking up the loose or leading ends of the web which have beensevered and are pushed against the previously glued cores by means of springslater described. The glue that or segment the web 15 transversely. This arrangement I is used when winding toilet paper, etc., and may be eliminated when Winding other materials such as waxed paper, etc. The web then passes between-the secondary perforator roll 21 and a secondary bed roll or web slitting roll 25 and thence, around the roll 25 where the web is slit longitudinally into predetermined widths by the coaction of the slitting roll 25 with slitting knives 26 carried by a shaft 27. The web then passes between the secondary bed roll 25 and a bed roll 28. A guide roll 29 provided with a gear '30 whichmates with a gear end 31 of the bed roll (seen 'in Fig. 4) guides the web 15 about the periphery of the bed roll 28. The knife-- equipped shaft 27 is pivotally mounted upon the end frames by means later described, while the rollers 20, 22, 21, 25 and 28 are all journalled in the end frames or walls B and C of the machine'upon suitable bearings and are all driven rollers. The guide roll 29 is rotatably mounted in arms 32 which are secured to a'shaft 33 by any suitable means. In the illustration; the arms 32 are split adjacent the shaft 33 and thesplit segments are drawn tightly about the shaft by bolts 34. A sec- 0nd arm 35 is keyed to the shaft 33 by pins 36 so that movement of the arm 35 pivots the shaft 33 and the arm 32. The shaft 33 is pivotally mounted within the. end frames or walls B and C. 'A helical spring 37 is secured to the opposite end of the arm 35 and carries a rod 38 secured to a bracket 39. The bracket 39 is releasably locked to a shaft 40 by bolts 41. By this structure, the degree of engagement of the guide roll 29 and the gear 30 with the bed roll 28 may be adjusted by positioning the bracket 39 as desired upon the shaft 40 and locking the bracket in the selected position by means of the bolts 41; At the same time, the guide roll 29 and the gear 30 are yieldably held in engagement with the bed roll 28 by the spring 37, and the guide roll may be moved from engagement with the bed roll if it is subjected to an unusual lateral force. The gear 30 is locked to the guide roll 29 by means of a key 42.

The web 15 passes over the bed roll 28 and is wound upon cores mounted upon mandrels or core shafts 43 which are fixedly carried by a turret or spiders 44.

The mandrel assembly F is rotatably mounted upon depending brackets which in turn are freely rockable about and carried by the upper cross tubing E. The turret 4 is a multiple stage turret and in the embodiment illustrated has six separate stations. A core receiving station'is indicated by the letter a and at this station core lengths are inserted onto the core shaft or mandrel. This operation may be manual or a suitable mechanism (not shown) may be used to accomplish this result. In the sequence of operations, the turret 44 is rotated to the core cutting station 11 where a plurality has previously been applied 'to the surface ofthe core causes the end of the web to adhere to thecorepand the winding of -a predetermined length of 'web onto the core is started.

, While this takes place, the core shaft continues moving down, around and increasingly farther away from tionally engages the lower edge 49 'of an arm or bracket 7 bed roll 28, until it reaches station e, where it continues to wind. After a substantial portion of the rolls have been wound at this station, the core shaft continues on towards the core stripping station f. The rolls are finished wound when the core shaft following is approaching bed roll 28 and the webs are severed.

In moving the core, which now has a web wound thereon, from station'e to station 1, thecore shaft fric- 543. The lower edge 49 of the bracket 50 is arcuate and corresponds with the are through which the a core is moved. The engagement of the bracket 50 with the periphery .of the core shaft brakes the core shaft and a slow rotational motion is thereby imparted tothe core shaft. It will be noted that in moving from the finished wound position between e and f, to station f, the core shaft movesout of engagement with the belt 48, and the continued rotational movement ofthe core andshaft is ob: tained solely by engagement with the lower surface or edge 49 of the bracket 59. The purpose of having the wound core rotate while moving between the finished wound position between eand f and the stripping station f is to insure engagement of the tail of the web,which has.

not been as yet secured to the filled core or roll and is V flying free thereof, with a brush 51, mounted upon a supporting arm'52. A felt wiper 53 secured to the arm loose tail of the wound web wipes over the bristles of the brush, the tail is charged electrostatically with a polarity such that the tail is attracted to the wound roll by the electrostatic attraction between the two and lies securely thereagainst. The electrostatic applicator member or brush 51 may be made of many materials; however, we have found that nylon gives particularly desirable results and does not damage the tail of the web. At station 1 the wound cores are stripped from the core shaft and the turretagain rotates to bring the empty core shaft intothe core receiving station a, and the cycle of operation is completed.

Referring particularly to Figs. 2, 5,' l4 and 15,"t he core cutting assembly H comprises a plurality of axiallyspaced cutter assemblies 46 which are 'mounted upon' a shaft 54. Theshaft 54 is pivotally mounted inbrackets carried in the hangers 45 Which restrain the shaft from axial movement. The cutting assemblies 46 may be positioned axially along the shaft 54 at any desired points so as to cut the core length into individual cores or segments of the required length. It is to be noted that the first and thereafter alternate cutter assemblies 46 are mounted to engage the upper surface of the core, while the second and thereafter alternate cutter assemblies are mounted to engage the lower surface of the core.

The core cutter assemblies 46 each include a cutting knife or disk 58 rotatably mounted within a recess provided in a supporting block or freely rockable arm 59. The disks 58 are supported upon axles 60 mounted within the blocks 59 that are threaded to receive nuts 60a. The blocks 59 are equipped with collars 61 having a bore 62 therein adapted to rotatably receive the shaft 54. The blocks 59 are also equipped with annular recesses 63 which receive one end of the springs 64. Collars or cranks 65 having integrally-formed extensions 66 adapted to align with the blocks 59 when assembled are equipped with a bore 67 that lockably receives the shaft 54. The extensions 66 have a shoulder 68 that abut to provide a recess enclosing the disk 58 when the collars 65 are assembled with the block 59. The extensions 66 may also be equipped with annular recesses that are aligned with the recesses 63 in the block 59 when the collars 65 and block 59 are assembled. The recesses in the extensions 66 receive an end of the springs 64. Adjustable stop screws 69 equipped with lock nuts 70 extend through threaded bores in the extensions 66 positioned forwardly of the recesses.

In assembled condition as shown in Fig. 14, the collars 65 are locked to the shaft 54 by any suitable means such as a key, etc., while the block 59 and collar 61 are free to pivot upon the shaft 54 and the action of the springs 64 urges the block 59 away from the extensions 66. To prevent the block 59 from moving away from the extension 66 to a position releasing the spring 64, brackets 71 which are equipped with an aperture 72 are secured to the block 59 by means of a bearing bolt 73 extending through the apertures 72 and received within a threaded bore 74 in the side of the block 59. The brackets 71 are also equipped with elongated slots 75 receivin the bearing portion of a bearing bolt 76 extending therethrough and received within the threaded bore 77 provided in the side of one of the extensions 66. The block 59 and the extension 66 of the collars 65 may move apart under the urging of the spring 64 to the extent permitted by the elongated slot 75 in the bracket 71. However, the extent of movement within the slot 75 is determined by the position of an adjusting screw 78 equipped with a lock nut 79 which is received within a bore provided in the bracket 71 communicating with the upper portion of the slot 75. It is seen, then, that by appropriate axial positioning of the adjustable stop screws 69, the extent of movement of the block 59 toward the extension 66 may between the block 59, which carries the cutting knife, and the extensions 66, is deter 'ned by the adjustment of the screw 78. These adjustments accommodate accurate adjustment of the cutting knives.

The shaft 54 has secured thereto supports 80 and 81. The support 80 has a U-shaped end 82 upon which are mounted rotatable wheels 83. The wheels 83 engage the mandrel or core shaft 43 adjacent its free end to provide support for the core shaft during the cutting of the core. The support 81 has an extension 84 to which is rotatably secured a support wheel 85. The wheel 85 supports the core length while it is being cut. A driven roller 86 equipped with spaced-apart knurled portions 86a (Fig. 8) frictionally engages the cores 87 mounted upon the core shafts 43 when the cores and shafts are in core cutting station 12. The roller 86 rotates the cores, which are at this point loose upon the core shafts 43,

be limited while the spacing and a complete and clean cutting of the core about the periphery is accomplished. The mountings for the core shafts 43 (to be described later) provide a clamp collar that also serves as a stop for limiting the extent of insertion of the cores 87 onto the shafts and each core is thereby properly positioned for cutting, etc., when it abuts the collar.

It can be seen in Figs. 3 and 5 that when the cores and shafts are in core cutting position at station b, the cutting disks or knives 58 extend into the line of movement of the cores and core shafts, and provision must be made to permit movement into and from the core cutting station b. To this end, the shaft 54 upon which the cutting knives are supported is povitally mounted within the brackets 55 which secure it to the support shaft 56. During movement of the turret 44, and when the core cutting station b does not have a core and shaft therein, the weight of the core cutting assemblies 46 causes the shaft 54 to turn within the supports or brackets 55 and the cutting knives turn downwardly. In the downward position the lower cutting knife 53 has moved outwardly from the path of travel of the core shaft and core, and a core may move upwardly and into the space between the disks 58. As the core shaft moves upwardly, an annular bearing 88, which may be rigidly or rotatably mountedupon the core shaft 43, engages an arm or lever 89 which is locked to the shaft 54. As the core shaft 43 moves upwardly, the bearing 88 moves the lever 89 upwardly, which in turn pivots the shaft 54 within the supports 55. The core cutting assemblies 46 therefore move upwardly and into the cutting position. Upon the next movement of the turret, the shaft 43 is moved inwardly and upwardly through another arc, while the bearing 88 through engagement with the lever 89 pivots the shaft 54 which in turn moves the upper cutting disk 58 out of the path of travel of the core and shaft. When the core and shaft have moved beyond the upper cutting disk 58, the bearing 88 moves free of the lever 89 and the core cutting structures move downwardly and into a position to receive the next shaft and core. A suitable stop may be provided to limit the pivotal movement of the shaft 54, etc., such as 89a (Fig. 2).

In moving from the station c to the station d, the cores engage glue applicators or wheels 47. The glue applicators can be seen in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, while the detail of the arrangement is seen best in Fig. 5. A casing 90 providing a reservoir for a suitable glue is shown mounted upon a supporting bracket 91 which in turn is rigidly secured to a stationary tube 92. A cover 93 having a handle 94 closes the casing 90. The cover 93 has a plurality of longitudinally-spaced slots 95 through which extend the upper edges of the knurled applicator wheels 47. The wheels 47 are mounted upon a shaft 96 which is driven by means later described. As the applicator wheels 47 rotate within the reservoir provided by the casing 90, the knurled peripheries of the wheels pick up a quantity of glue which is applied to the surface of the core segments as the core moves over the wheels. Any desired number of applicator wheels may be mounted upon the shaft 96 and it has been found particularly desirable to have two applicator wheels for each core segment when the segments are cut in lengths adapted for the winding of toilet paper.

When the winding of a core has been completed, the turret 44 continues to rotate and brings the wound core into the stripping position 7 and the stripper J removes the wound cores from the core shaft. The stripper I is seen best in Figs. 1 and 2 and in partial cross section in Figs. 3 and 5. The stripper J comprises a pair of pulley wheels 97 and 98 which are rotatably supported by support plates 99 and 100. A continuous belt 101 is mounted on the pulley wheels 97 and 98 and is moved thereby. Pulley wheel 98 is an idler wheel, while the pulley wheel 97 is driven by a motor 192 through a of the wound cores.

belt 103. For this purpose, the armature shaft of motor 102 is equipped with a pulley wheel, if a belt is used as a driving connection, or the armature shaft may be equipped with a sprocket 104, and in this case the memher 103 would be a link or sprocket chain. The axle 105 supporting the pulley wheel 97 between the supports 99 and 100 is equipped at one end with a pulley wheel or sprocket 106, as the case may be, which is driven by the belt or chain 103. The supportv plates 99 and 100 may be secured to the end frames or walls B and C by any suitable means, and in the illustration the plate 100 is mounted upon brackets 107 and 108 by any suitable means such as welding, while the brackets are secured to the end walls or framesB and C by bolts 109. Any suitable mounting for the motor 102 may be used.

The continuous belt 101 may be made of various materials, and it has been found that a leather belt gives very desirable performance. The belt 101 is equipped with a laterally-extending cleat or lug 1 that engages the wound core at the end adjacent the turret 44, and as.

the lug is moved from the left to the right of the machine by the rotational movement of the belt 101, the lug pushes the wound core from the mandrel or core shaft 43 and onto the upper surface of the belt 101. The cores arethus stripped from the core shafts and are delivered by the belt to a conveyor arrangement (not shown) or into packing boxes, etc., or otherwise removed from the machine. The upper half of the belt 101 is supported by an elongated member or supporting guide over which the belt glides. The elongated supporting guide 111 prevents the belt from sagging under the weight An idler roller 112 mounted between the supporting plates 99 and 100 may be employed to take up slack in the belt. The actuation of the motor 102 which drives the stripper belt 101 at the proper time will be later described. The electrical circuit for the motor 102 is broken when the lug 110 trips a limit-switch 113 which is mounted under the lower half of the belt 101. In the position shown in Fig. 2, the motor 102 would be actuated and the stripper belt would be moving, because the lug 110 has not yet triggered the limit-switch 113. As the lug or cleat 110 moves toward the left of the machine, the limit-switch 113 would be triggered and the motor 102 would be deactuated, thus stopping the movement of the belt.

'The turret 44 upon which are mounted the six spaced core shafts 43 comprises a pair of complementary spiders 114 and 115 which are keyed to the rotatably-mounted turret shaft 117 and held against axial movement by pins or set screws 116 (seen best in Fig. 7). If desired, the spiders may further be coupled by studs or bolts 116a extending therethrough (Figs. 3 and S). The turret shaft 117 is rotatably mounted within the hangers or brackets 45 and a bronze or similar bearing 117a is provided in the hanger at the right end for this purpose (Fig. 8). If desired, a similar hearing may be included in the left end hanger. The shaft 117 is held within the hangers 45'by bolts 117b tightened against washers 1170. The spiders 114 and 115 are spaced apart and the core shafts or mandrels 43 are rotatably mounted within the spiders upon support bearings 118. The core shafts 43 are relajtively heavy, particularly when loaded, and the spaced spiders 114 and 115 stabilize the shafts 43 by supporting them at two spaced points. A bushing 119 is'fixedly mounted upon the portions of the shafts 43 that extend through the spiders 114 and 115, and the bearings 118 are mounted upon the bushings. Essentially, the shafts 43 are rotatably mounted within the spiders 114 and 115 and are driven in rotation during the winding of the web upon the cores at station 2 and for short periods before a shaft enters this station and for a short period after leaving, by a pulley wheel 120 which engages one side of thedouble V belt 48. However, the pulley wheel 120 is not directly fixed to the shafts43 or to the bushing 119 but is rotatably supported thereon by spaced bearings or keyed or otherwise lockedto, the core shaft 43 and.

- edges of the members 139 are straight and are machined '75 121, and a clutch assembly is provided to drive the shafts through the pulley .wheels 120. The clutch functions to per'rnitfla gradual slowing-down of the core shaft as the" jammed, etc., and also eliminates shock, etc., in that the inertia of the core shaft is overcome gradually.

The pulley wheel 120 is equipped with a laterallyextending flange 122 that frictionally engages the flange 123 of a collar. 124 through a frictionplate 125. The collar 124 is keyed to' the bushing 119 and is free to move axially thereon, and the bushing in turn is pinned thereof. The outer race :of the bearing 126 is equipped with a plurality of spaced pins or studs 127 extending into aligned apertures 7127a provided in a nut 128. Springs 128a are positionedswithin the-apertures 12 7a and urge the pins 127 and bearing 126 outwardly and against a shoulder with which the collar 124 is equipped. The nut 128 receives an externally-threaded sleeve 129 which in turn is received within the'spider 115. The bearing 118 Within the spider 115 is received within the sleeve 129. The nut 128 may be positioned to adjust the clutch initially by compressing the springs 128a as desired and allows compensation to he made for wearing, etc., of.

the friction plate 125. The bushing 119 is equipped at its inner end with a flange or :clampcollar 130 that positions the bushing 119 within the. spiders. The opposite end of the bushing 119 is also'provided with a flange or clamp collar 131. The collars are split as are the ends of the bushing 119, and when the clamp collars are r and shaft 43 in position. 131 are equipped with races of in position they look the bushing Further, the collars 130. and inwardly projecting extensions that engage the the bearings 118. The annular bearing or core cutter control bearing 88 previously discussed is mounted upon the end of the shaft 43 and is held in position by a lock or snap washer 132 and rotates freely when engaged by the lever 89. The shaft assembly is assembled and held with the spiders by removable caps 133 (seen more clearly in Figs. 1 and 2) V In the core cutting and web rewinding machine of our invention, we desire to rotate the turret 44 intermittently so that each core shaft remains at each station for ashort, predetermined length of time before it is moved on to the succeeding station. For this purpose, I equip the turret 44 with a mandrel driving assembly G of a type that rotates the turret intermittently to move the mandrels through spaced arcuate distances. Specifically, I employ an internal Geneva movement that moves the coreshafts 43 through all of the various stations while locking the turret so that the shafts are held for a' definite time at each of the stations. The Geneva driving assembly consists of a generally circular plate or wheel 134 equipped with integral bosses 135 havingthreaded bores therein to threadedly receive bolts 136 extending through bores in the outer'spider 115. The plate 134 is thereby secured to the spider 115 and causes it to rotate when the plate 134 is rotatably driven. The plate 134 is equipped with a central bore 137 that receives the turret ing 139a therein that is somewhat less than a complete circle and is open on the side adjacent the axis of the plate. ,The arcuate opening is aligned with the bores 138. The members 139 form extensions of the plate 134 about the outer portion. of each of the bores 138. The outer so that each pair of adjacent members 139 form elongated Secured to the plate slots 149 therebetween that are closed on one side by the plate 134 and that are open on both ends and also on the side that is away from the pit-.te 134. The members 139 form six slots 14% and these slots fall on diameters of the plate 134 so that three pairs of diametrically opposed slots are formed.

The plate 134 is driven by a Geneva cam or driving member 141 which is provided with a central bore 142 that receives a rotatably mounted stub shaft 143. The driving member 141 is keyed to the shaft 143 which is jonrnalled within the hanger or bracket 45 upon bearings 144. The stub shaft 143 extends through a plate 145 which is mounted upon the hanger 45, and the shaft 143 is journalled within the plate 145 upon bearings 146. The driving member 141 has a generally circular periphery which is indented at one point to form a cam 147 (seen best in Fig. 6). The driving member 141 is also equipped with a roller or driving wheel 148. A crescentshaped locking member 149 is mounted upon the inner surface of the driving member 141 and is diametrically opposed to driving roller 148. It is preferred that the locking member 149 be formed integrally with the driving member 141, but it may be a separate member secured to the driving member 141 by any suitable means such as welding. The driving wheel 148 is mounted upon the driving member 141 by means of a stud and lock nut 150.

The driving member 141 is mounted so that the driving wheel 143 engages the slots 14%) while the locking member 149 rotates within the extensions of the bores 138 formed by the plates 139. The driving member 141 does not move relative to the center of the Geneva plate 134 but is driven in rotation by the shaft 143 by means later described. Following a sequence of operations, as the member 141 rotates, the driving wheel 148 enters the inner end of the slot 14!) and as the driving member 141 rotates, the wheel 148 moves outwardly through the slot 14%, and in so doing, rotates the driven member or plate 134. The driving wheel 148 moves through slot 140 to its outer end and then returns through the slot and finally leaves the inner end. During the movement of the driving wheel 148 within the slot 140, the driven member or plate 134 is moved through one-sixth of a complete rotation. While the driving wheel 148 has moved outwardly and has then returned through slot 140, the crescentshaped locking member 149 has been moving outside of the partial bore formed by the member 139. When the driving wheel 148 has completed a movement into a slot 140 and has :left the slot after the plate 134 has been rotated one-sixth of a complete rotation, the locking member 149 enters the extension of the bore 138 formed by the member 139 and locks the Geneva driven member 134, and consequently the turret to which it is secured, against rotational movement. The locking member 149 escapes from the bore extension provided with the member 139 when the driving wheel 143 has moved from the inner end of the slot 140 and has rotated to a position in which the wheel is entering the next slot 149. It is seen, then, that the turret 44 and the core shafts 43 mounted therein are rotated through a sixth of a revolution and are then locked in position while the locking member 149 is within the extension of the bore 138, and the turret is then moved through another sixth or rotation by the action of the driving wheel 14% within a slot 140 while the locking member 149 is free from or has escaped from the extension 13% of the bore 138.

The turret 4-4 and the Geneva driving assembly are mounted upon the depending hanger or bracket 45 that is adjacent the left end wall B of the machine. This bracket as Well as the bracket 45 depending on the opposite end of the machine are pivotally or rockably mounted upon the upper tubing E. For this purpose, the upper ends of the brackets 45 form a semicylindrical bearing to which is secured a mating cap 151 which may be secured to the end of the bracket 45 by bolts in any well known manner. It is desired to have the brackets 45 held within a position such that a core shaft which is in the position to start winding is generally abutting the bed roll'28. To insure this positioning of the brackets 45, a counterweight 152 is attached to the bracket '45 that is adjacent the left end of the machine. The force exerted by the counterweight 152 is suflicient to urge the turret, etc., rearwardly and the core shaft which is in the web winding position abuts the bed roll 28. However, it is desired to provide a sufficient clearance between the bed roll and the core shaft to permit a length of webbing to be Wound upon the core to form a relatively heavy roll. To provide this clearance, a roller 153 (seen in Fig. 4) is rotatably mounted upon an axle attached to a forwardly-extending bracket 153a secured to the end wall B. The periphery of the Geneva driving member 141, which is mounted on the hanger 45, engages the roller 153, and the positioning of the roller 153 is such that the brackets 45, and consequently the core shaft which is in web Winding position, are normally held in spaced-apart relation with the bed roll 28. However, when the cam 147 in the periphery of the Geneva driving member 141 rotates to a position receiving the roller 153, the counterweight 152 forces the turret assembly, etc., to pivot inwardly and the core shaft abuts the bed roll. This occurs once during each rotation of the Geneva driving member 141, and the cam is positioned so that the inward swinging of the brackets 45, etc., occurs when a core shaft is moving into the web Winding position. A core mounted upon the shaft, and which has already had glue applied to the periphery thereof, is thereby forced into contact with the end of the web and the web adheres thereto. As the Geneva driving member 141 continues to rotate, the cam 147 moves out of engagement with the roller 153 and the core shaft is moved outwardly from the bed roll 28 and is ready to have a substantial length of webbing wound thereon without interference.

The driving mechanism for our machine will now be described, with particular reference to Fig. 6. A motor 154 is mounted within the frame A in any well known manner and is used to drive a clutch assembly 155 through a multiple belt 156 driven by a pulley wheel 157 attached to the armature shaft of the motor. Any conventional clutch 155 may be used and since these are well known in the art, a detailed description will not be given. The clutch 155 is actuated from any one of a number of positions in the front of the machine by levers 158 (seen in Fig. 1) which are locked to a rock rod 159 which is pivotally mounted within the brackets 107 and 108. The rod 159 is coupled through a link 160 and arm 161 to the clutch actuating member 155a. Movement of the levers 158 serves to engage and disengage the clutch 155. The clutch 155 is also equipped with a hand wheel 162 that permits the driving shaft to be operated manually when this is desired. A limit or stop rod and arm 162a actuate a brake when the levers 158 are in forward position. If desired, a safety switch 162b may be positioned to break the motor circuit upon appropriate movement of the levers 158.

A drive shaft 163 is mounted within the clutch 155 and is driven in'rotation by the motor 154 when the clutch is engaged. The opposite end of the drive shaft 163 is equipped with a spur gear 164 which drives a gear 165 mounted upon the end of the axle 166 upon which the bed roll 28 is mounted, and the bed roll is thereby rotated. Mounted upon the axle 166 adjacent the gear 165 is a pulley wheel 167 which drives a sheave or pulley wheel 168 secured to the axle of the delivery roller 16. An idler roller 169 is provided to take up slack in the pulley belt 170 which links the Wheels 167 and 168.

The gear 165 secured to the bed roll axle 166 drives a spur gear 171 which is mounted upon the axle of the web slitting roll 25. The opposite end of the Web slitting roll axle is provided with a gear 172 that drives a spur gear 173 through idler gears 174 and 175. The spur gear 173 is mounted upon the web slitting shaft 27 which V a 11- drives the slitting knives 26. The gear 171 rotates the secondary perforator'roll 21 by engagement with the gear 176 which-is secured to the axle of the secondary perforator roll.

Mounted upon the oppositeend of the axle of the secondary perforator roll 21 is a spur gear 177 which meshes with a gear 178 mounted upon the axle of the perforator roll 22 and the roll 22 is thereby driven. At the same time, the gear177 engages gear 178 mounted upon the axle of the feed or pull roller 20. Mounted .upon the pull roller axle and adjacent the gear 179 is a sprocket 180 which drives a second sprocket wheel 181 through a sprocket chain 182. Idler sprockets 183 and 184 take up slack in the sprocket chain 182. The sprocket wheel 181 is equipped with a short axle 185 upon which is mounted a worm gear 186. V The' worm gear 186 eugages and drives worm wheel 187 which in turn rotates a worm wheel 188 which is secured to the common axle 18 9; The worm wheel 188 'drives worm 190 which is mounted upon a common axle 191 with a spur gear 192. Rotation of the worm 190 thereby rotates the spur gear 192 and it in turn meshes with idler gear 193 which drives a timing gear 194.

i The timing gear 194 is mounted upon an axle 195 which is equipped at one end witha hand wheel-196 and stub shaft 143 to which the Geneva driving member 141 is secured.

The core shafts or mandrels 43 are rotated when in V the web winding position by the double V belt 48 which engages the pulley wheels 120 that are mounted upon the core shafts 43. The belt 48 is driven by a large pulley wheel 200 which is mounted upon the drive shaft 163. A pair of idler pulley Wheels 201 and 202 complete the circuit for the belt 48. It can be seen in Fig. 3 that the idler pulley wheel 202 is rotatably mounted upon one arm of a bell crank 203 which pivots upon a shaft 204. A counterweight 205 is mounted upon the opposite arm of the bell crank 203 and tends to pivot the bell crank in a direction in which slack in the belt 48 is taken up by the idler wheel 202. V

The driven backing roller 86 which rotates the cores during the core cutting operation at station b is con tinuously driven by a separate driving motor 206 which is coupled to the backing roller through a gear reducer 207, spur gear 208 and 209, and a driving rod 210 which is directly coupled to the roller 86 by a universal joint 211. The backing roller 86 is equipped at its opposite end with a sprocket 212 (seen in Fig.5) which'drives a second sprocket 213 through a sprocket chain 214. Mounted upon the same axle with the sprocket 13 and adjacent thereto is a larger sprocket 215 which drives the shaft 96 upon which the glue applicator wheels 47 are mounted through a sprocket chain 216 which engages 'a sprocket 217 mounted upon the end of the shaft 96. Both the backing roller 86 and the glue applicator wheels' 47 are continuously driven, then, by the motor 206. The sprockets 213 and 215 are both rotatably mounted upon a bracket 218 which is fastened by screws or any other suitable means to a brace 219 which in turn is mounted upon the stationary tube 92 and which rotatably supports the backing roller 86.

The stripping conveyor or belt 101 is driven by an independent driving motor 102. Since the driving assembly for the stripper has previously been discussed, it will not now be further mentioned.

Referring particularly to Fig. 9, which shows more clearly the'mounting of the timing gear 194 and the Geneva driving gear 199, the means by which the machine is timed will be explained. The. spur gear 197 is keyed tothe axle 195 and is locked against axial movement thereon by a pin or set screw 220. The axle 195 is rotatably supported upon bearings 221 within the upper tubing E. The bearings 221 are locked upon the axle 195 by a nut bushing assembly,

222 which receives the threaded end of the axle 195. A

etc., of the well known type is further employed in conjunction with the bearing 221 and the axle 195 to rotatably secure the axle within the tubing E. The opposite end of the axle 195 is reduced in diameter and equipped with a plurality of keys andkeyways 223 upon which the hand wheel 196 and the timing gear 194- are splined. The hand wheel 196 and the tim-.

. ing gear 194 are locked together by bolts 224 so that "axial o-r sliding movement of the hand wheel upon the splined portion of the axle 195 also moves the timing gear 194. A washer 225and lock nut 226 with which the splined end of the axle is equipped prevent'unintentional movement of the hand wheel 196 and the timing gear 194 attached thereto, from the axle 195.

The slidable movement of the hand wheel 196 and the timing gear 194 becomes important in the event that the web 15 being fed through the machine is accidentally broken in some manner. When this occurs, a great waste of paper would result if it were necessary to detach the broken web and rewind a portion of it upon either the core that is within the web winding position, or to wind a portion upon a new core, so that the machine could continue through a normal sequence of operations before again being ready to rewind-acomplete and usable roll of paper. If breakage occurs, it is only necessary to withdraw the hand wheel 196 which in turn disengages the gear 194 from the idler gear 193; The gear train is.

. then broken and the Geneva drive, etc., are no longer linked with the prior gears and movements of the machine. Since the hand wheel 196 is splined to the axle 195, the axle and the spur gear 197 may be rotated by manual movement of the hand wheel and in this mannerthe Geneva drive is actuated and a new core is moved into the web winding position. When the web is then attached. to the core, a complete roll of paper may be wound .upon' the core and the only wastage is the length of webbing that was being wound upon the previous core when the breakage occurred.

Due to the fact that each tooth on the change gear 194 represents one revolution on bed roll 28, the machine cannot get out of time when the Geneva drive has been operated manually.

It may be that it is necessary from time to time to adjust our web rewinding machine to permit rolls of various sizes to be wound. For example, it may be desired at one time to wind rolls of toilet tissue having 650 sheets per roll, while at another time rolls having 1,000

sheets thereon are required. Changing the machine for' this purpose is readily accomplished'by removing the lock nut 226 and the washer 225 from the splined end of the axle 195 and then withdrawing the hand wheel 196 and the timing gear 194. The bolts 224 are removed and the timing gear 194 is free of the hand wheel 196.

j The timing gear 194 may then be replaced with another timing gear of greater or less diameter, depending upon whether it is desired to rotate the turret more slowly so that larger rolls of paper may be wound, or to rotate it wheel 196 by the bolts 224 and the assembled unit is replaced upon the splined end of theaxle 195'. The washer 225 and the lock nut 226 are then replaced and the machine is ready for operation.

By referring to Fig. 4 and Fig. .9, it

the timing gear 194 upon a laterally movable axis. The gear 193 is rotatably mounted upon a stud 227 equipped with bearings 228. The. stud 227 is mounted for lateral movement within an arcuate slot 229 and is locked within the slot at a selected position by an elongated nut 230 and a hexagonal member231 formed integrally with the stud 227. As the stud is screwed into'the nut 230, the

l member 231 is drawn tightly against the frame A. The

outer end of the stud 227 is threaded and receives a nut will be seen that provision has been made for interchanging the timing 7 gears 194 by mounting the idler gear 193 which drives 7 V 13 232 that retains the bearings 228 and the gear 193 upon the stud.

It may be seen in Fig. 9 that the gear 192 is secured to the shaft 191 by a set screw 232 and that the idler gear 198 is mounted upon an axle 233 equipped with bearings 234 and which is mounted upon the bracket 45.

The ease with which the apparatus may be timed is largely facilitated by the actuating mechanism we employ to start the core stripping motor 102 and to trigger the web severing knife 235 (seen in Fig. 3 and in detail in Figs. 10 and 11) and which will later be described. The core stripping motor 102 is actuated by a limit-switch 236 which is mounted upon the plate or bracket 145 (Figs. 12 and 13). The limit-switch 236 may be secured to the plate 145 in any suitable manner and for this purpose we prefer to mount the switch upon a bracket 237 equipped with elongated slots 238 and which may be mounted upon the plate 145 by screws 239 extending through the slots 233. The slots 238 permit the bracket 237 to be adjustably positioned upon the plate so that it may be actuated at the proper instant. The limit-switch 236 is secured to the opposite end of the bracket 237 by any suitable means such as screws, etc., and is equipped with the usual biasing spring 240 and actuating lever 241. We prefer to equip the outer end of the lever 241 with a roller 242. The limit-switch 236 is actuated when an arm 243 which is mounted upon the end of the stub shaft 143 and rotates therewith engages the roller 242. The arm 243 may be secured to the end of the stub shaft 143 in any desired manner, and in the illustration the arm 243 is slotted so that the ends may be drawn tightly about the end of the shaft by a bolt, etc. The arm 243 makes one revolution for each complete revolution of the Geneva driving member 141, and it is seen that the switch 236 and consequently the stripper motor 102 will be actuated once for each revolution of the Geneva driving member. This occurs, as previously explained, once for each one-sixth of a rotation of the turret 44 or once each time a new core and shaft is moved into the stripping position.

Mounted upon the opposite upper corner of the plate 145 is a second limit-switch 244. The limit-switch 244 is secured to a brace 245 by any suitable means, and the brace in turn is mounted upon the plate by screws 246. The limit-switch 244 is equipped with a biasing spring 247 and arm 248, the outer end of which is provided with a roller 249. Upward movement of the arm 248 triggers the limit-switch 244 and causes the web severing knife 235 to sever the web.

The switch 244 is actuated when the arm 243 engages a shoulder 250 with which a lever 251 is equipped. The lever 251 is pivotally mounted upon a bolt 252 equipped with a bearing washer 253. The arm 243 is restrained from axial movement on the bolt 252 by a lock nut 254. The lever 251 is normally biased against a stop 255 by a spring 256, and movement of the arm 243 against the shoulder 250 moves the end of the lever to which the spring 256 is secured in a manner to extend the spring.

Upon the upper end of the lever an actuating block 257 is pivotally mounted. The block 257 is equipped with a straight, angular edge 258 which is held in normal engagement with a mating edge provided in the lever 251 by a spring 259. When the arm 243 engages the shoulder 250, the upper end of the lever 251 is pivoted to the right, in the illustration in Fig. 12. As the block 257 is moved against the roller 249, when the upper end of the lever 251 is moved to the right, the block is pivoted and slides under the roller 249 without actuating the limit-switch 244. However, when the arm 243 has moved past engagement with the shoulder 250, which is cut off very sharply at its lower end, the action of the spring 259 snaps the lever 251 back into its normal position against the stop 255. In the meantime, when the block 257 had moved beyond or to the right of the roller 249, the action of the spring 259 returned the block to its normal position (the one shown in Fig. 12).

Since the block can pivot no further in the direction in which it is biased by the spring 259, when the lever 251 returns to its normal position the upper corner of the block 257 engages the roller 249 and forces the roller and the arm 248 upwardly and the limit-switch 244 is actuated. It is seen that this assembly provides an extremely rapid and singular actuation of the limit-switch 244 which is particularly desirable since the actuation of the web severing knife must be extremely quick and must occur at the proper time. It is apparent that the web severing limit-switch 244 is actuated once for each rotation of the arm 243. The plate is secured to the left hanger 45 in spaced-apart relation by spacers 159a centrally bored to receive bolts.

While the web is being wound upon cores received by the mandrels 43, it is necessary to lock the cores to the mandrels so that they rotate when the mandrels or core shafts 43 are being driven by the belt 48. The locking mechanism can be seen best in Fig. 7. The core shafts 43 are hollow throughout their length and support concentrically therein a rod 260. The rod 260 is slidable axially within the core shafts and for this purpose is slidably supported in bearings 261 and 262. The bearings may be of bronze or any other suitable material and may be secured within the ends of the core shafts 43 in any well known manner such as by pressing the bearings into the ends. The slidable rod 26%) is equipped with a cone-shaped guide and supporting member 263 at the end adjacent the free end of the core shaft. The slidable rod is equipped with a collar 265 that is pinned to the rod to prevent axial movement of the stop with respect to the rod. A stop 266 is pinned to the rod adjacent the bearing 261 and prevents the rod from being withdrawn from the core shaft. A helical spring 267 is interposed between the bearing 262 and the collar 265 and normally urges the rod 260 axially toward the free end of the core shaft.

The core shafts are equipped with a plurality of axiallyspaced slots 268 that are alternately on opposite sides of the shaft. Adjacent each of the spaced slots 268, the slidable rod 260 is provided with dogs or locking fingers 269. The fingers 269 are received within elongated recesses 279 within the rod and are pinned within the recesses so that they may be pivoted or rocked. The outer end of the fingers 269 is received within the slots 268 and when the slidable rod 269 is moved to its extreme right position or when the stop 266 is abutting the bearing 261, the upper edge of the dogs or fingers lies flush With the outer surface of the core shafts 43. In this position, cores may be inserted onto the core shafts or may be freely withdrawn therefrom. When the rod 260 is moved toward the left against the force exerted by the spring 267, the fingers 269 pivot within the recesses provided in the rod 260 and the upper edge of the fingers juts outwardly from the slots 268 and from the surface of the core shaft. In this position the fingers engage the inner surface of the cores mounted upon the shaft and the cores are so locked that relative rotational movement between the cores and shaft is prevented. It has been found satisfactory to employ one locking finger 269 for each core segment when rolls of toilet paper are being Wound.

The means by which the locking fingers 269 are actuated through movement of the rod 260 against the force of the spring 267 may best be understood by referring to the structure illustrated in Fig. 8. The rod 261 is moved axially within the core shaft to the finger-locking position by an arm 271. The arms 271 are equipped at their outer end with a cup 272 in which a bearing 273 is supported. Secured to the inner race of the bearing 273 is a cone 274 adapted to receive the pointed or coned end of the member 263. Since projection of the locking fingers 269 through the slots within the surface of the core shafts results in the slidable rod 262 rotating with the core shaft, the bearing assembly in the cup of the arm 271 permits the rod and core shaft to be rotatably supported therein.

The arms 271 are pivotally mounted upon a spoolshaped member 275 which is equipped with a bore 276 15 e adapted to receive the turret shaft 117. The member275 is locked to the shaft 117 by a set screw 277. The spoolshaped member 271 has a laterally-extending flange 278 at one end upon which the arms 271 are pivotally mounted and a laterally-extending flange 279 at its opposite end to which links 280 are pivotally secured. A connecting link 281 is pivotally fastened to both the arm 271 and the link 280 and has an extension 282 to which a roller 283 is fastened by means of a bolt 284 and anut 285; The link 280, connecting link 281 and roller 283 constitute a cam follower and pivot the arm 271 about its mounting upon the spool-shaped member 275. A barrel cam 286 is secured to the depending hanger 45 by bolts 287. The cam 286 is provided with a bore 288 adapted to receive the turret shaft 117. The periphery of the cam 286 is equipped with a groove or channel 289 that receives the rollers 283. The shape of the channel 289 is such that the arms 271 are moved into a position of engagement with the coned ends 263 of theslidable rods 260 during certain positions of the core shaft while the arms are withdrawn from engagement with the ends of the slidable rods 260 and into a retracted position during other positions of the core shafts The retracted position of the arm 271 is indicated by the lower arm shown in Fig. 8 and is designated by the number 271a An arm 271 is provided for each core shaft 43 and the arms move into engagement with their respective core shafts when the shafts are generally adjacent the glue applicator wheels 47 and retract when the shafts move from the web winding position.

It has been found that the coned ends 263 of the slidable rods will not always move into seating position within the cones 274 as the arms 271 are pivoted into engagement with the rod ends. To insure seating and thereby prevent damage, etc., to the parts, the outer ends of the arms 271 are also equipped with U-shaped or fork-shaped members 290. The U-shaped members 290 have spaced prongs V 291 that receive the cone-shaped outer end 263 of the rods 260 and guide them into position within the cones 274. When the members 263 are firmly seated within the cones 274, the ends 263 are moved beyond the point of engagement with the prongs 291 and rotate free of the prongs.

Not only must the arms 271 be withdrawn from the position supporting the core shafts 43 when the cores are inserted onto and withdrawn from the shafts, but it is also essential that the arms be retracted into position permitting movement of the arms under the bracket 292 which supports thestationary tube 92. As mentioned previously, the tube 92 is utilized as a means for supporting the glue applicator assembly and also supports the driven roller 86 which rotates the cores when at the core cutting station. Bracket 292 is rigidly secured to the hanger 45 by bolts 293.

After a predetermined length of webbing has been wound upon the cores, the wound length of webbing is severed :from the continuous webbing strip 15 which is drawn from the parent roll 10. The turret 44 then rotates the filled core through an arcuate distance to the core stripping station f, and at the same time a partially filled core is moved into the web winding station e. The severing knife 235 is mounted within the bed roll 28 and is actuated periodically to sever the Web at the proper instant. The actuating assembly is shown most clearly in Figs. 10 and 11, and reference will be made to these figures in describing the features of this assembly. Rotatably mounted upon the bed roll axle 166 is a spool-shaped member 294 having a central cylindrical portion 295 equipped with laterally-extending flanges 296 and 297. The flange 297 is provided with apertures 298 which receive bolts (not shown) which rigidly secure the spool-shaped member 294 to the end wall C of the machine. The flange 296 has a continuous circular periphery with the exception of a slot 299 out in one portion of the flange. The slot 299 is adapted to receive selectively a cam member 300 or a filling block member 301 which completes the periphcry of the flange and makes it a complete circle through- The cam 300 and the filling block member 301 are against the flange 297 and the Washers 304'normally mounted upon a rod 302 that extends between the flanges 296 and 297 and slightly beyond the flange 296; The rod 302 is slidably mounted within a laterally-extending sup port 303 which is formed integrally with the cylindrical portion 295 of the spool-shaped member. The cam 300' and the filling block member 301 are locked to the slidable rod 302 by any suitable and well known means so that these members move with the rod. Two spaced Washers 304 are rigidly fastened to the slidable rod 302' and provide a stop or support surface against which'a helical spring 305 abuts on one end, while the opposite end of the spring is positioned against the inner surface of the flange 297. 'The'force exerted by'the spring 305 forces the slidable rod 302 to move toward the left or to- Ward the bed roll 28' to a position in its side walls lying flush with 28.1 The rod 302 is normally stop finger 306 which enters a no periphery of the flange 296.

The stop finger 306 slides within a recess 308 with} which the integral support member 303 is equipped. Se-

cured to the lower end of the stop finger 306 is the armature 309 of a solenoid 310. Solenoid 310 is mounted upon a bracket 311 which in support member 303 or to member 295 by welding, 'etc. When actuated, the armature 309 is the surface of the cylindrical the solenoid 310 is 302 moves the cam'300 into the slot 299.

A cam follower 312 comprising a equipped with a rotatably mounted roller 314 and a shaft 315 'actuates the web severing knife by the cam 300. which'in turn is pivotally mounted within the bed roll 28, and the roller 314 is held in engagement or rides upon the periphery of'the flange 296 by the force exerted by spring members 316 against arms 317 which are locked to the shaft 315. The shaft 315 is equipped with a plurality of arms 317 whichhold or support the Websevering knife 235. The knife 235 may bebolted or welded, etc.,

to the arms 317. A spring 316 is provided for each of the I arms 317 and the springs are supported within re cesses provided in a support member 318 mounted within the bed roll 28. In Fig. 11, the severing knife 235 is shown within the bed roll 28 is solid lines and the position of the severing knife when it is actuated is shown by dotted lines and indicated by the number 235a.

On the severing knife 235 are mounted elliptical guide be bolted 'or riveted, etc.,

members 320. The guides may to the knife 235. When the severing knife is actuated, both the knife and the guide members 320 move laterthe surface of the bed roll28 extending from end to end 1 The slot 321 isequipped with spaced, V laterally-extending slots or openings 322 throughwhich the guide members 320 project. The guides320 engage' ally and outwardly from through an elongated slot 321 of the bed roll.

which the cam 300 is received within the slot 299 provided in the spool flange 296. The earn 300 is held within the slot 299 with the side walls of the flange; 296 by proper positioning of the stop washer 304. Thewasher 304 engages the integral support 303 and limits the axial movement of the rod 302 toward the bed roll held in a position in which:

A the filling block member 301- lies within the recess or slot- 299 and completes the periphery of the flange 296 by a tch 307 in the lower sur- 7 face of the slidable rod 302. a The notch 307 'is positioned so that when the stop finger 306 enters therein the filling block member 301 makes a perfect completion 'of the turn isrrigidly secured'to the drawn downwardly and the 7 stop finger 306 ismoved out of notch 307, and the force within the slot 299. The solenoid'310 limit-switch 244 (Figs. 12 and 13) once A turret 44,.in the manner pre-; viously described. Thus, when the limit-switch 244 is tripped, the solenoid-310 is actuated and the slidable rodslotted link 313 235 in response to.

the indentation in the-periphery of the flange 296 caused The link 313 is locked tothe shaft 315

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2931590 *Dec 10, 1956Apr 5, 1960Paper Converting Machine CoWeb winding mandrel
US3044532 *Mar 30, 1960Jul 17, 1962Vita Mayer & Co IncTail sealing machine
US3116890 *Aug 1, 1961Jan 7, 1964Paper Converting Machine CoWeb winding apparatus
US3127122 *Apr 20, 1961Mar 31, 1964 Rewinding mechanism for printing machines
US3128057 *Jun 12, 1962Apr 7, 1964Procter & GambleDouble ply web transfer device
US3279709 *Nov 18, 1963Oct 18, 1966Gustin Bacon Mfg CoTextile fiber winder
US3369766 *May 17, 1966Feb 20, 1968Scott Paper CoWeb winding
US3409243 *Feb 8, 1965Nov 5, 1968Scott Paper CoWinding apparatus
US3442463 *Nov 3, 1965May 6, 1969Scott Paper CoWinder tension control
US3791603 *Sep 18, 1972Feb 12, 1974Kimberly Clark CoMethod and apparatus for improved web transfer
US4122738 *Jul 12, 1977Oct 31, 1978Maurice GrangerApparatus for the cutting and simultaneous dispensing of a web of roll material
US4213363 *Oct 11, 1978Jul 22, 1980Maurice GrangerApparatus for the cutting and simultaneous dispensing of a web of roll material
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/530.1, 242/583, 242/525.7, 242/580, 242/524.1, 242/532.3, 242/525.6, 242/533.5, 242/531.1
International ClassificationB65H19/22, B65H75/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2301/4148, B65H2301/414424, B65H2301/41362, B65H2301/41745, B65H75/02, B65H2408/2312, B65H2408/23157, B65H19/2223
European ClassificationB65H75/02, B65H19/22A4