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Publication numberUS2769723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1956
Filing dateMar 20, 1953
Priority dateApr 21, 1952
Publication numberUS 2769723 A, US 2769723A, US-A-2769723, US2769723 A, US2769723A
InventorsBailly Louis
Original AssigneeBailly Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Needlework canvas carrying a stitchwork pattern and method of stencilling said pattern thereon
US 2769723 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1956 L. BAILLY 2,769,723

NEEDLEWORK' CANVAS CARRYING A STITCHWORK PATTERN AND METHOD OF STENCILLING SAID PATTERN THEREON Filed March 20, 1953 United States Patent f NEEDLEWORK CANVAS CARRYING A STITCH- WORK PATTERN AND METl-IOD OF STENCIL- L ING SAID PATTERN THEREON My invention has for its ob ect a canvas carrying a previously drawn pattern for carpets, tapestries, em-

h broideries and the like and a method for executing same.

The application of patterns on a canvas has been hitherto executed in accordance with one of the following three methods:

"According to a first method, the pattern is first drawn separately and then transferred stitch by stitch by the operator from the drawing onto the canvas. This method allows, it is true, the execution of carpets, tapestries or the like of the most varied and difiicult types. However, the necessity of transferring the pattern stitch by stitch makes the operation of embroidery or the like very trying and Wearisome. In addition thereto, the patterns for the execution of larger works assuming a surface of say 2 m. x 2 m. can be obtained in the trade only at a scale of one quarter and the enlargement is left to the care of the embroiderer or the like operator.

The second method consists in transferring the pattern onto the canvas in various colors or shades through impression. This method is however applicable in practice only for patterns showing large ornaments or motifs and which stand a certain lack of accuracy. In fact, the pattern is not in register with the cross-points of the canvas and the embroiderer has to decide at every moment whether he has to remain on the inside of the line of the pattern or whether he should shift the work outside the latter. Consequently the embroiderer is never sure which pattern he will finally obtain and thus the method under discussion is not applicable for small ornaments which require a particular accuracy in execution.

Lastly, it is possible to draw the pattern directly on the canvas, this being obtained by stretching colored threads by hand either between the weft threads or between the warp threads, according as to whether it is desired to operate on the weft or on the warp. The colored threads indicate the colors to be used by the operator for his work. This method allows, it is true, an extremely accurate work, but it requires to a certain extent a preliminary embroidery which is itself obviously to be executed in accordance with the above-disclosed first method.

The present invention has for its chief object to remove the drawbacks inherent to the three methods. According to the said invention, the pattern is applied to the canvas 60 in register with its threads so that it may appear either on the weft threads or on the warp threads. In the case of a pattern thus applied onto a canvas, it is possible for the embroiderer to execute his work in a manner which is just as accurate as in the case of the use of a special 65 pattern drawing. But this does away with the transfer of the pattern stitch by stitch onto the canvas, since the drawing appears already on the canvas and follows exactly the threads forming the fabric of said canvas.

In a particular embodiment, it is possible to produce 70 the canvas with its previously drawn pattern in a manner such that the canvas is defined in the desired color or 2,769,723 Patented Nov. 6, 1956 colors by means of corresponding stencils the openings in which are distributed in conformity with the distribution of the threads in the canvas.

In the execution of a canvas carrying a previously drawn pattern for knot-stitches of the type used in Turkey carpets, it is possible to proceed in a manner such that each color is applied in two separate successive steps, the stencils being shifted between the two steps so as to define acomplet'e knot by two half-knots. It is however also possible to apply each color in a single step by showing a complete knot through impression on parallel threads.

I have illustratedby way of example in accompanying drawings various embodiments of a canvas carrying a previously drawn pattern in accordance with my invention. In saiddraw'ings:

Fig. l is a view of a first embodiment of the canvas.

Fig. 2 is a view of a stencil.

. Fig. 3 is a view of a' further embodiment of the canvas.

The canvas illustrated is intended for use in the execution of knot-stitches for Turkey carpets. According to Fig. 1 the canvas includes weft threads 1 and warp threads 2. 'The selvedge is shown at 3. A colored ornamentor motif is shown diagrammatically on said canvas, said ornament corresponding mate present case to the lower left hand corner of a carpet. Three different colors are shown and appear respectively as an oblique hatching directed towards the" right, as an oblique hatching directed towards theleftarid as dots. Itis known that in the'formation of carpet knots, ea'ch knot must be executed either in two steps along a diagonal. so that two halfkn o ts' forming together a full knot are produced, or else a s ingl e stepis required with operation on two parallel threadsto form a'knot f i l n the example illustrated in Fig. 1, the work is executed on the weft th'reads'2. Two half-knots forming together a complete knot are'designated by a cross at lz'z and 4!) respectively As apparent, the shifting between thetwo halfknots .is performed along a diagonal'line'. In Figfl, the pattern transferred colors onto the apparent sections" of the weft threads located between warp 'threads." The patternj'follows thus in aperfectly accurate manner the a'rirangernent of the different crosspoints corresponding thereto. The canvas thus printed is" the exacfreproduction or the" drawn pattern printed on paper, on which appear the corresponding theoretical positions of the weft thread and of the warp threads. The fabric of the canvas shown in Fig. l coincides thus exactly with such theoretical squares. It is therefore possible to print the colors on the canvas by means of a stencil, in particular by means of a stencil such as that shown at 5 in Fig. 2, the openings 6 in which stencil correspond exactly to the distribution of the threads in the canvas fabric and to the knots to be executed. A stencil is used for each color. The stencil shown at 5 is intended for the execution of the color illustrated in Fig. 1 by the oblique hatchings directed towards the right hand side.

It should be remarked that the openings 6 in the stencil 5 correspond merely to half-knots so that it is necessary with a view to printing the complete pattern to apply each color in two stages or steps while the stencil is shifted between said stages in a manner such that after impression of the first half-knot, a second half-knot is again applied through the stencil.

In the canvas illustrated in Fig. 3, the color is applied to the warp threads designated by the reference '7 and no longer on the weft threads 8. Said color is thus applied to the apparent sections of the warp threads defined between the Weft threads. The selvedge is designated by the reference number 9. The knots are thus produced on the warp threads.

The canvas according to the invention may be used as well for knot-stitch work as for cross-stitch and half crossstitch works, for tapestries or the like.

What I claim is:

1. A coarse needlework canvas carrying a pattern for carpets, tapestries, embroideries and the like stitchwork, said canvas having a system of spaced weft threads, 3. system of spaced warp threads and a pattern of marks applied only to apparent sections of only one of said system of threads in colors and locations corresponding to the colors and locations of the stitches to be executed, said apparent sections being situated exclusively between the threads of the other system.

2. In a method for the home production of carpets, tapestries, embroideries and the like stitchwork, the steps consisting in forming at least one stencil provided with openings along parallel lines, distributed in a manner similar to the distribution of one of the systems of parallel threads in a coarse needlework canvas fabric having a system of strictly equidistant spaced warp threads and a system of strictly equidistant spaced weft threads, the openings in the different lines of each stencil being distributed in accordance with the distribution of the knots of a given color along the corresponding canvas threads in the finished stitchwork, placing the different stencils in succession over said coarse canvas fabric in a manner such that the openings in the stencil register with the apparent sections of the first'mentioned thread system in the canvas fabric which sections are located between two successive threads of the other system, applying a corresponding color through the openings of each stencil thus positioned over the canvas fabric onto said sections of threads appearing through said stencil openings to define the locations of the stitches to be executed on the canvas in corresponding colors.

3. In a method for the home production of carpets, tapestries, embroideries and the like stitchwork, the steps consisting in forming at least one stencil provided with openings along parallel lines, distributed in a manner similar to the distribution of one of the systems of parallel threads in a coarse needlework canvas fabric having a system of strictly equidistant spaced warp threads and a system of strictly equidistant spaced weft threads, the openings in the difierent lines of each stencil being distributed in accordance with the distribution of the knots of a given color along the corresponding canvas threads in the finished stitchwork, placing the different stencils in succession over the said coarse canvas fabric in a manner such that the openings in the stencil register with the apparent sections of the first mentioned thread systems in the canvas fabric which sections are located between two successive threads of the other system, applying a corresponding color through the openings of each stencil thus positioned over the canvas fabric onto said sections of threads appearing through said stencil openings to mark the locations of half knot stitches thereon, shifting each stencil after said marking through the distance between the crossings of two threads of each system and the two following threads of each system, applying again the same color through the stencil to mark the locations of the complementary half knot stitches on the sections of the first mentioned thread system then apparent between two successive threads of the second system and forming knots in corresponding colors over the corresponding half knot markings.

4. In a method for the home production of carpets, tapestries, embroideries and the like stitchwork, the steps consisting in forming at least one stencil provided with openings along parallel lines, distributed in a manner similar to the distribution of one of the systems of parallel threads in a coarse needlework canvas fabric having a system of strictly equidistant spaced warp threads and a system of strictly equidistant spaced Weft threads, the openings in the diiferent lines of each stencil being distributed in accordance with the distribution of the knots of a given color along the corresponding canvas threads in the finished stitchwork, placing the diiferent stencils in succession over the said coarse canvas fabric in a manner such that the openings in the stencil register with the apparent sections of the first mentioned thread system in the canvas fabric which sections are located between two successive threads of the other system, applying a corresponding color through the openings of each stencil thus positioned over the canvas fabric onto said sections of threads appearing through said stencil openings to print in a single stage the locations of the different knot stitches of a given color on parallel threads of the canvas fabric.

References Cited in the file of this patent v UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,495,146 Ariente May 27, 1924 2,310,436 Johnson Feb. 9, 1943 2,375,237 Morgan May 8, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS 157,682 Great Britain Jan. 27, 1921

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1495146 *Jun 29, 1923May 27, 1924Sayles Finishing Plants IncOrnamented fabric and method of ornamentation
US2310436 *Dec 23, 1939Feb 9, 1943Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoPrinting upon fabrics
US2375237 *Jun 28, 1943May 8, 1945Johnson Ross MApparatus for printing lengths of material
GB157682A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3208483 *Sep 9, 1963Sep 28, 1965Cameo Curtains IncNon-woolen textile that simulates woolen homespun fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/265, 428/196, 112/1, 427/282, 101/129
International ClassificationD04G3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04G3/00
European ClassificationD04G3/00