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Publication numberUS2770302 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1956
Filing dateJan 8, 1952
Priority dateJan 8, 1952
Publication numberUS 2770302 A, US 2770302A, US-A-2770302, US2770302 A, US2770302A
InventorsLee Filemon T
Original AssigneeLee Filemon T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for shredding paper or the like into strips
US 2770302 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. T. LEE

Nov. 13, 1.956

MACHINE FOR SHREDDING PAPER OR THE LIKE INTO STRIPS 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 8, 1952 IN VEN TOR.

FILEZMON T.

LEE

ATTORNEYS zmwoz F. T. LEE

Nov. 13, 1956 MACHINE FOR SHREDDING PAPER OR THE LIKE INTO STRIPS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 8, 1952 INVENITOR.

F l L. EMON T. E E

ATTORNEYS 13, 1956 F. T. LEE 2,770,30z

MACHINE FOR SHREDDING PAPER OR THE LIKE INTO STRIPS Filed Jan. 8, 1952 4: Sheets-Sheet 5 ll 26 llii llll JNVENTOR.

FLLEMON T. LEE.

A'T-roFeNEvs MW. 13, F. T. LEE MACHINE FOR SHREDDING PAPER OR THE LIKE INT O STRIPS Filed Jan. 8, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN V EN T 0R.

FILEMQN T. LEE

mmv ATTOFQN VE- United States Patent MACHINE FUR SHREDDING PAPER OR THE LIKE INTO STRIPS Filemon T. Lee, San Francisco, Calif.

Application January 8, 1952, Serial No. 265,375

2 Claims. (Cl. 164-60) The present invention relates to improvements in a machine for shredding paper or the like into strips. It embodies improvements over the paper shredding machine disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 94,851, filed in the United States Patent Office on May 23, 1949, now Patent No. 2,621,567.

In designing paper shredding machines employing rotary disc cutters, experience has shown that a surface speed of approximately three hundred (300) feet per minute should be imparted to the cutters. At the same time, it is highly desirable to employ a standard eighteen hundred (1800) revolutions per minute (R. P. M.) motor. In order to meet these requirements, the cutter-supporting shafts are relatively small in diameter. Of course, the employment of the standard 1800 R. P. M. motor and the small diameter shafts both contribute to the reduction in the cost of manufacture.

However, these small diameter shafts, and especially when they have considerable lengths, have a tendency to bow between their ends, thus reducing the efficiency of the cutters. Any attempt to insert conventional bearings of regular width along the length of the shaft would space the cutters too far apart where the bearings are located. Moreover, combs must be positioned adjacent to the cutters to remove cut strips of material therefrom, which would interfere with the positioning of a number of ordinary bearings along the shafts.

With these general structural requirements in mind, I have provided a machine of the character described, in which bearing-spacer rings are carried by the combs. These rings embrace the shafts on which the cutters are mounted, and give ample support to the shafts at a plurality of points along the lengths of the shafts. This will permit the smaller diameters of shafts to be employed without any bowing thereof. Furthermore, these bearing rings are arranged to abut the cutter discs to space the latter from opposing faces of the combs. The bearing rings may be made as large in diameter as neces sary, without interfering with the spacings between adjacent cutters.

Other objects and advantages will appear as the specification continues. The novel features will be set forth in the claims hereunto appended.

Drawings For a better understanding of my invention, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings, forming part of this application, in which:

Figure l is a fragmentary front elevation view of a machine for shredding paper or the like into strips, and constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figures 2, 3 and 4 are oblique views of the spacerbearing ring, disc cutter, and comb, respectively, which form a unit in my machine.

Figure 5 is an enlarged view of the left-hand portion of Figure 1, illustrating the assembly sequence of the cutters, combs and bearing rings for one-eighth inch /s") shreds;

2,770,302 Patented Nov. 13, 1956 'icei Q annexed claims without departing from the spirit thereof.v

Detailed description Referring now to Figures 1, 5 and 6, I show upper and. lower shafts A and B, respectively, which are mounted in parallel and spaced-apart relation with one another.. These shafts are rotatably journalled in bearings 10 carried by a supporting frame designated generally at C. (See Figure 5.) Intermeshing gears 11 are fixed to these shafts (see Figure l) for rotating the latter in opposite directions with respect to each other, as suggested by the arrows 12 (see Figure 6), when rotary motion is imparted to a driven pulley 14 secured to the shaft B (see Figure 1). Belts 15 are provided for driving this pulley from a motor (not shown), which preferably has a speed of 1800 R. P. M.

It will be noted from Figure 6 that shreds or strips 16 may be cut from stock material D, such as paper, which is arranged on an in-feed table 17. This material is advanced along the table in the direction of the arrow 18 so as to pass between the shafts A and B. A lateral guide 19 may be provided in the table to assist in directing the stock material toward the shaft.

In Figures 1 to 6, inclusive, the machine has been assembled for cutting one-eighth inch /s") shreds or strips from the material D, However, I do not wish to be limited in this regard. As the specification proceeds, I shall point out the manner in which the machine may be converted for producing one-quarter inch (MU) strips in connection with Figure 7, while conversion to cutting one-half inch (*/2) strips will be set forth when describing Figure 8. Of course, other widths of strips may be produced.

Regardless of the width of strips desired, a plurality of disc cutters E, combs F, and spacer-hearing rings G are provided for each of the shafts A and B. The disc cutters on one shaft are interjacent the cutters on the other shaft. As the specification continues, it will appear that the width of the strips 16 cut from the material D depends upon the predetermined manner in which the disc cutters and the combs are arranged upon the rotatable shafts.

Each disc cutter E has a peripheral groove 20 extending circumferentially therearound, and is fashioned with an axial opening 21 adapted to telescopically receive one of the rotatable shafts. The latter are formed with keyways 22 extending lengthwise thereof to receive keys 23, which project inwardly from each disc cutter into its opening 21 (see Figure 3). The grooves 20 in the cutters are for the purpose of aiding in traction for feeding the material between the cutters. Moreover, these grooves guide the material in a straight line, preventing it from moving into the cutters at an angle.

By way of example, the cutters E may have a thickness of one-eighth of an inch 0A3) between its opposing side faces 24 (see Figure 3). However, no dimensional limitation is intended in this connection. Quite obviously, the disc cutters may have greater or less thickness.

All of the combs F are identical with each other. As illustrated in Figures 4 and 6, each is provided with a ring-receiving opening 25 extending therethrough so that the combs may be telescoped over the shafts A and B. Each comb is made in the nature of a plate having a 3 semi-cylindrical crown 26, diverging sides 27 and a base 28. Curved notches 7.9 'are provided in each comb at the junction of the crown 26and the sides 27, which register with the peripheries of the disc cutters (see Figure 6). he combs on each shaft are interjacent the cutters on the shaft,

As the strips 16 emerge from the cutters E at the front end of the machine, there is, a tendency for them to follow the revolving cutters. strips are projected into the notches 29 disposed on the left-hand. side of Figure 6, which results in forming kinks 30 that glide out of the notches. After short relatively straight sections 31 of the strips have cleared these notches, the strips are pulled again into the notches, due

to the revolving cutters tending to carry the strips therewith, producing other kinks 32 in the strips. These its are fashioned in the strips at intervals throughout the lengths thereof to produce zigzag strips having a certain amount of rigidity, and at the same time requiring less material for packaging merchandise or the like. When the walls of the comb defining the notches 2? at one side of the comb Wear down, the combs may be reversed to present the other notches 29 at the discharge side of the cutters.

It will be seen that a spacer-bearing ring G is provided for each of the combs. The bore 33 of each ring is dimensioned for sliding over the shafts A or B, while the outer periphery 34 has a running fit with the wall defining the ring-receiving opening 25 of each comb. The rings. turn with the shafts around which they are applied.

In actual practice, the width of each ring G between its opposing faces 35 (see Figure 2) is slightly greater than the thickness of each comb. This will allow the bearing ring to project beyond the opposing sides 36 of the combs F (see Figure Thus, the rings G serve to space the opposite faces 24 of the cutters E from the comb sides 36 when the cutters, spacers and combs are assembled on their respective rotating shafts. Also, the bearing rings are slightly wider than the cutters so that the cutters on one shaft will not bind against those on the other shaft.

For the purpose of precluding the shafts A and B from flexing away from one another, rigid upper and lower plates 37 and 33 are mounted on the supporting frame C in parallel and spaced-apart relation with each other. These plates define confronting parallel flat surfaces 370: and 38a, respectively (see Figures 5 and 6). The bases 28 of the combs associated with the shaft A abut. the upper plate 37 along the said flat surface ofthe latter, while the bases of the combs surrounding the shaft B rest against the lower plate 38 along the said flat surface of the latter. These plates may be reinforced by ribs 39 (see Figure 6); and, if desired, a cover plate 40 may be arranged over the ribs of the upper plate.

In order to add further support to the combs F and thereby retain the shafts A and B from flexing away from one another when the material D is being cut, I have provided pairs of retaining rods 41 above and below the shafts A and B, respectively. These rods telescope through openings 42 formed in the plate-like combs, and have their ends anchored in sockets 43, which are secured to the supporting frame. The combs are slidable longitudinally along these rods, and thus permit the combs F and their hearing rings G to float therealong totake care of expansion due to heat. Moreover, the plates 37 and 3t and rods 1 prevent the combs from turning about their respective shafts.

Reference to Figures 4 and 6 discloses radial grooves 44 as being made in the combs to allow oil to be introduced to the bearing rings for lubricating the latter.

In Figure 1, I show collars 45 as being anchored to the shafts A and B toward the right-hand ends thereof, while split lock nuts 46 are adjustably fastened near the left-hand ends of these shafts. The purpose of these collars and lock nuts is to retain the cutters E, combs F The leading ends of the and bearing rings G in assembled relation with respect to the shafts A and B.

The sequence of assembling the various parts for obtaining one-eight inch shreds or strips 16 of cut material will be understood by referring to Figure 5. It will be noted therein that the first item to be placed on the lower shaft B next to the split lock nut 46 thereof is a disc cutter E. This is followed by a comb F and its bearing ring G. However, on the upperjshaft A, a comb and its bearing ring are appliednext to the lock nut 46 on this shaft, followed by a cutter E. In assembling, care should be taken to assure the fact that the combs and bearingrings onthe shaft A are disposed ;in alignment opposite the cutters on the shaft B, and vice versa.

The mechanic continues placing the cutters, combs and bearing rings on the two rotating shafts until the required number of each have been telescoped thereonto. When all are assembled, the lock nuts 46 are tightened in place, leaving the proper clearance between the cutters.

When assembling the machine for producing onequarter inch 0A1) shreds 0r strips, as shown in Figure 7,- the same general procedure is followed, excepting for the fact that two of the cutters E are grouped together, and a pair of combs F and their bearing rings G are interposed between adjacent groups of cutters on each of the shafts A and B. As clearly illustrated in this arrangement (Figure 7), the pairs of cutters on theshaft B are mounted in alignment opposite the pairs of combs on the shaft A, and vice versa. The combined widths of each pair of cutters will provide strips of the desired size. For the sake of simplicity, the remaining parts of the machine have been omitted from Figure 7. Also, toward the right side in this view cutters E and combs F are shown in separated relation and being moved into place along the shafts.

In Figure 8, I show the assembly of the parts for cutting one-half inch /2") shreds or strips. The same procedure is followed, as previously explained, except in this case four cutters E are grouped together, followed by four. combs F and their spacer-bearing rings G. Again, the cutters on one shaft are arranged opposite combs on the other shaft, and interjacent the cutters on the other shaft. The right side of Figure 8 illustrates cutters E and combs F being advanced into place along the lower shaft. The

assembled combs on each shaft are interjacent the cutters on the shaft.

Quite obviously, other widths of strips may be cut Summary of operation Assuming that the machine has beenset up as shown in Figures 1, 5 and 6, for cutting one-eighth inch shreds or strips 16 from the material D, power is applied to the driven pulley 14 so as to rotatethe shafts A and B in opposite directions relative to one another, as suggested I by the arrows 12 in Figure 6.

Initially, a small stack of the vmaterial D, for instance paper, 18 placed on the iii-feed table 17.. Thenthe operator starts shredding with a fewthicknesses of paper,

by advancing the latter between the rotating disccutters E. The amount of paper may be gradually increasedto determine how many thicknesses of paperthe machine will cut beforestalling. By experimenting, the operator will soon get the feel of they right amount to feed, the cutters or shredder, at one time. i

The changeover of the machine to produce different The, shredder .will de-. hver a greater output when not fed too heavily; the,

shredder will take normal feedings more rapidly than the operator can feed it.

As the paper is advanced along the infeed table, as suggested by the arrow 18 in Figure 6, it will be severed into a plaurality of strips 16 by the rotating cutters E. These strips will tend to follow the cutters, but will be removed therefrom by the interposed combs F. The cut strips will be projected into the notches 29 arranged at the out-feed side of the cutters (left side of Figure 6), kinking the strips at intervals, such as 30 and 32. These strips will fall into an inclined discharge chute 47 (see Figure 6).

In converting the machine to cut strips of one-quarter inch 4") widths, the cutters E and combs F are mounted on the shafts A and B in the manner shown in Figure 7. Likewise, the machine may be set up to deliver strips of one-half inch /2) widths by rearranging the cutters and combs on the shafts A and B in the way illustrated in Figure 8.

As previously pointed out, other combinations of the cutters and combs may be resorted to for cutting strips of other widths. Also, thinner or thicker cutters and combs may be provided within the spirit of the invention.

It is of particular importance that the combs F, their bearing-spacer rings G and the rigid plates 37-38 are arranged to prevent the shafts A and B from flexing or bowing away from one another. This maintains the cutters in proper relation for effecting shredding the paper, or other material.

I claim:

1. In a machine for shredding paper or the like into strips, 21 frame, a pair of parallel shafts journaled at spaced complementary points in said frame, a plurality of spaced disc cutters mounted on each shaft intermediate said journals with the cutters on one shaft being interjacent the cutters on the other shaft, means for rigidly supporting said shafts intermediate the journal points and for maintaining the cutters in fixed relationship on said shafts comprising a plurality of combs mounted on each shaft, the combs on each shaft being interjacent the cutters on the same shaft and being opposite the cutters on the other shaft, the combs each having fiat bases extended transversely of the shafts with the fiat bases of the combs on one shaft extending parallel to the flat bases of the combs on the other shaft, said frame having an upper plate and a lower plate defining flat facing parallel surfaces, the flat bases of the combs on one shaft being seated on one of said surfaces, and the fiat bases of the combs of the other shaft being seated on the other of said surfaces, means for connecting said combs to the respective shafts comprising a ring associated with each comb, each ring having a sliding fit with its associated shaft and a running fit with its associated comb and projecting outwardly of the comb on each side thereof to space each comb from the elements adjacent each comb on the associated shaft, said surfaces and bases being perpendicular to a line extending diametrically through both shafts and parallel to the normal line of feed of material to said cutters.

2. In a machine for shredding paper or the like into strips, a frame, a pair of parallel shafts journaled at spaced complementary points in said frame, a plurality of spaced disc cutters mounted on each shaft intermediate said journals with the cutters on one shaft being interjacent the cutters on the other shaft, means for rigidly supporting said shafts intermediate the journal points and for maintaining the cutters in fixed relationship on said shafts comprising a plurality of combs mounted on each shaft, the combs on each shaft being interjacent the out ters on the same shaft and being opposite the cutters on the other shaft, the combs each having fiat bases extended transversely of the shafts with the flat bases of the combs on one shaft extending parallel to the fiat bases of the combs on the other shaft, said frame having an upper plate and a lower plate defining flat facing parallel surfaces, the flat bases of the combs of one shaft being seated on one of said surfaces, and the flat bases of the combs of the other shaft being seated on the other of said sur faces, means for connecting said combs to the respective shafts comprising a ring associated with each comb, each ring having a sliding fit with its associated shaft and a running fit with its associated comb and projecting outwardly of the comb on each side thereof to space each comb from the elements adjacent each comb on the associated shaft, said surfaces and bases being perpendicular to a line extending diametrically through both shafts and parallel to the normal line of feed of material to said cutters, a pair of retaining rods extending parallel to said shafts and through each of the combs associated with one shaft and having a sliding fit with the combs, said rods being spaced from said surfaces and from said shafts, said rods being secured to said frame, and a pair of retaining rods extending parallel to said shafts and through each of the combs associated with the other shaft and having a sliding fit with the latter combs, the last named rods being spaced from said surfaces and from said shafts, and being secured to said frame.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,178,386 Edwards Apr. 4, 1916 1,319,496 Stachowski Oct. 21, 1919 2,106,896 McCullough et al. Feb. 1, 1938 2,202,843 Edwards June 4, 1940 2,554,114 Menkin May 22, 1951 2,621,567 Lee Dec. 16, 1952 2,679,900 Bottenhorn June 1, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 65,852 Norway Mar. 1, 1943

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Referenced by
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US2978942 *Feb 21, 1957Apr 11, 1961Congoleum Nairn IncDicing machine having spaced transverse cutters associated with rotary slitters
US3033064 *Jan 12, 1959May 8, 1962Filemon T LeeSupport and stripper for cutter head in a paper shredding machine
US3286574 *Apr 22, 1964Nov 22, 1966Paul Durand AugustePaper slitting apparatus
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Classifications
U.S. Classification83/114, 241/236, 493/365, 83/500, 83/166, 493/370
International ClassificationB02C18/00, D21B1/00, D21B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationB02C2018/0069, B02C18/0007, D21B1/10
European ClassificationB02C18/00B, D21B1/10