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Publication numberUS2770854 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1956
Filing dateDec 4, 1952
Publication numberUS 2770854 A, US 2770854A, US-A-2770854, US2770854 A, US2770854A
InventorsVictor J. Miszeika
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incense briquette
US 2770854 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 20, 1956 v. J. MISZEIKA 2,770,854

INCENSE BRIQUETTE Filed Dec. 4, 1952 United States Patent 2,770,854 3 INCENSE BRIQUETTE Victor J. Miszeika, Chicago, Ill., assignor' to Hindu Incense Mfg. Co., Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application December 4, 1952, Serial No. 323,969 2 Claims. (Cl. 21-116) This invention relates to improvements in briquettes of volatile combustible materials such as incense. More particularly, the invention relates to improvements in such briquettes, especially of the cone-shaped types; the improvements being such as to afford a briquette in which the efliciency of combustion or percentage of recovery of the volatile ingredients are increased by as much as forty to fifty percent.

Heretofore incense has been provided and used in briquettes of various sizes and shapes. The cone-shapes have been particularly popular and in fact have proven to be somewhat more efficient than some of the other shapes. However, even this form of briquette is not nearly as efficient from the standpoint of percentage of recovery of volatile products of combustion as could be desired. For this reason the use of incense has not been as widespread as the beneficial properties of such a product would warrant.

Attempts have been made to increase the efiiciency of recovery of incense by various methods in addition to changing the form or shape of the briquette itself. Numerous devices for igniting and burning the incense have been provided, but from the standpoint of increasing the efiiciency of combustion, these devices have not been successful. However, as far as can be determined, improvements in the structure of the briquettes themselves have not been attempted heretofore.

It is therefore an important object of this invention to provide a form of briquette which will significantly increase the efficiency of combustion and percentage of vaporization recovery. An object relating thereto is to so construct the briquette that a considerable greater percentage of the volatile products of combustion of the briquette will be released and escape into the atmosphere.

Another object of this invention is to afford an incense briquette in which more complete combustion of the briquette itself is achieved than heretofore.

A further object is to provide an incense briquette in which a greater percentage of recovery of the volatile products of combustion is achieved, despite the fact that the weight of the briquette may be materially reduced from the weight of a similarly shaped and sized briquette.

Still another object is to afford an incense briquette in which less volatile but less expensive ingredients may be used without sacrificing any overall effectiveness or percentage of recovery of the volatile products of combustion as compared with present briquettes of the same weight.

Still a further object is to provide in an incense'briquette means for more effectively conveying the volatile products of combustion into the atmosphere.

Yet a further object is to afford a briquette for combustible volatile materials such as incense of inexpensive simple structure but which nevertheless afford maximum efiiciency of combustion and percentage of recovery of the volatile products of combustion.

With the foregoing and other objects in view which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, arrangement and a combination of parts hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that various changes in the form, proportion, size and minor details of thestructure may be made with- 2,770,854 Patented Nov. 20, 195 6 out departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention. 7

For the purpose of facilitating an understanding of my invention, I have illustrated in the accompanying drawings a preferred embodiment thereof, from an inspection of which, when considered in connection with the following description, my invention, its mode of construction, assembly and operation, and many of its advantages should be readily understood and appreciated.

Referring to the drawings in which the same characters of reference are employed to indicate corresponding or similar parts throughout the several figures of the drawrngs:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a briquette embodying the principles of my invention with the inner structure shown in dotted outline;

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevational view taken on the plane of line 22 in Fig. l of the drawings and viewed in the direction indicated;

Fig. 3 is likewise a sectional elevational view taken on a plane rotated from that of Fig. 2 as indicated by line 3-3 in Fig. 2 of the drawings and viewed in the direction indicated;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view similar to that of Fig. 2 but showing the briquette ignited and partially consumed;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to that of Fig. 4 but showing the briquette more completely consumed;

Fig. 6 is a bottom plan view as taken on the plane of line 6-6 in Fig. 5 and viewed in the direction indicated;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged view of the briquette shown in Fig. 5 but also illustrating the improved method of combustion and the manner in which the improved structure contributes to the increased recovery of the products of combustion; and

Fig. 8 is a view similar to that of Fig. 7 of the usual or present cone-shaped briquette illustrated for the purpose of comparison.

Turning now to the drawings, reference numeral 10 indicates generally an incense briquette of cone shape which may be composed of the usual ingredients ordinarily used in the manufacture of incense. Primarily the principal ingredient is neutral charcoal with a binder such as starch and containing drugs, such as scents and gums, essential oils, aromatics and if necessary, solvents in the event that the aromatics used are of the insoluble types.

The cone 10 may be defined by a base 12, a top 14 and a generally inclined conical surface 16.

Heretofore such cones have been solid without any other structural or design features other than those 'described above. In the combustion of such cones the incense is ordinarily first ignited at the top and permitted to burn in the atmosphere as illustrated in Fig. 8 of the drawings. As the combustion progresses a layer of ash 18 is formed on the outer surfaces of the cone and progresses downwardly as the balance of the cone is ignited. During combustion the central portion of thecone underneath the ash comprises a glowing core 20 with temperatures varying from 500 to 550 C.

Of course it should be obvious that the object of the combustion of the cone of incense is to vaporize the volatile ingredients so that they may escape into the atmosphere and achieve the various functions intended; namely, deodorization, fumigation and the like. Hence the object is not only to vaporize as much of the volatile ingredients of the incense as possible but also to see to it that the maximum proportion of the volatile products of combustion are conveyed into the atmosphere. To achieve the maximum degree of efliciency I have found that it is important that the volatile products escape into the atmosphere at points sufficiently removed from the burning or ignited portion of the briquette to prevent their being either absorbed by the ash or reabsorbed and more completely burned by the hot core of the briquette.

Obviously reabsorption and more complete combustion would reduce the percentage of recovery or escape of the gases to the atmosphere.

Again directing attention to Fig. 8 of the drawings, it will be noted that as the conventional type of cone burns, the volatiles are released not only from the zone of combustion but also below the actual zone of combustion where temperatures have already been reached suflicient to volatilize the ingredients of the incense. Such temperatures of volatilization may ordinarily be as low as 180 C. The temperature of combustion of the briquette itself may be approximately 500 to 550 C. Thus as the combustion of the cone progresses downwardly the volatile ingredients are released ahead of the actual point of combustion as shown in Fig. 8.

As these products of combustion escape they move upwardly and, because of the partial vacuum which is formed about the upper portion of the cone by the temperature gradient, are drawn close into the burning cone. This results in the vapors being either absorbed by the ash or more completely burned as they pass through the elevated temperature zones of the cone.

To improve the combustion of the cone for the purpose of avoiding the absorption of the gases by the ash and the recombustion of the products of volatilization by the hot core of the cone, the applicant has devised a novel though simple structure which will release the products of combustion in such a manner that they will not pass through or near the ignited portion of the cone; thereby permitting their direct escape into the atmosphere.

The structure comprises a central cavity 22 formed at the center of the cone in the lower portion thereof and cates directly with the cavity 22 for a purpose which will be revealed as the description proceeds.

Turning now to Figs. 4, 5 and 7 of the drawings, it

will be noted that when the cone is ignited, a layer of I ash 18 forms over the glowing core 20. As the combustion proceeds the ash continues to form along the outer edges of the core 20; the core 20 increasing in size.

As was stated hereinabove upon initial ignition of the briquette, certain ingredients of the incense are volatilized and escape into the atmosphere. As the combustion proceeds downwardly the temperatures of the unignited portions of the cone begin to rise until the volatilization temperature is reached. When this temperature is reached, the volatile ingredients are vaporized and escape from the unignited portions of the cone as well as from the ignited portions. Obviously the area in which the volatilization temperature is reached is an area completely surrounding the area of combustion, i. e. throughout a complete arc of 360 C. Hence, the greater the surface area the greater the area from which the vapors may escape. Consequently the added surface area afforded by the central cavity contributes directly to the efficiency of vaporization of the cone.

A considerable proportion of the vapors released as described above find their way into the cavity 22 and move downwardly to the bottom 12 as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 7. They then move through the passages afforded by the slot 28, between the top of said slot and the top of the surface S upon which the cone is placed, until it reaches the outer surface 16 of the cone. At this point, the vapors begin to rise almost vertically straight up in the paths indicated by the arrows in Fig. 7. However, because the diameter of the base of the cone 12 is greater than the diameter of any other portion of the the vapors are not drawn either close to the ash 18 or the glowing core 20. t

The slot 28 may be dispensed with if the cones are not intended for positioning on a solid flat surface. For example, should the cones be placed on a wire mesh or slightly tilted on a flat solid surface, the vapors could readily escape from the mouth of the central cavity and be conveyed to the edge of the base, through the atmosphere rather than through the passages of a slot.

It should be obvious then that my novel briquette structure afiords an improved means of combustion of an incense briquette resulting in a significant increase in the effici'ency or percentage of recovery of the volatile products of combustion. As a matter of fact, extensive tests and experiments have established the fact that the percentage of recovery is increased by as much as forty to fifty percent over that of a cone briquette of the same size or dimensions. Furthermore, this percentage of recovery is achieved despite the fact that by forming the cone with the central cavity and bottom slot the actual weight ofthe briquette is at least 15% less then the weight of a solid cone of similar size and shape.

It is believed that my invention, its mode of construction and assembly, and many of its advantages should be readily understood from the foregoing without further description, and it should also be manifest that while a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described for illustrative purposes, the structural details are nevertheless capable of wide variation within the purview of myinvention as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A conically-shaped briquette of neutral carbon impregnated with incense ingredients volatilizable at elevated temperatures, a central portion of said briquette formed with a longitudinally-extending cavity of substantial dimension opening to the base of the same, upon ignition of the briquette said cavity adapted to conduct the volatile products of combustion into the atmosphere, a substantial portion of said volatile products of combustion being released into the atmosphere at points sufiiciently removed from the ignited portions of the briquette to prevent the reabsorption and recombustion thereof, said base having a transverse open slot extending diametrically across the same.

2. A briquette of combustible carbonaceous material impregnated with incense ingredients volatilizable at elevated temperatures, said briquette formed with a base, a central portion of said briquette formed witha cavity opening to said base, said cavity adapted to conduct the volatile products of combustion into the atmosphere, and means formed in said briquette for releasing a substantial portion of said volatile products of combustion into the atmosphere at points sufiiciently removed from the ignited portions of the briquette to prevent the re-absorption and recombustion thereof, said means comprising portions of said base formed with at least one slot communicating between said cavity and the edge of said base.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 106,773 Blake Aug. 30, 1870 236,889 Hammer et a] Jan. 25, 1881 1,047,416 Katzenberger Dec. 17, 1912 1,507,434 Schollmeyer Sept. 2, 1924 1,609,814 Gray Dec. 7, 1926 1,866,931 Hefternan July 12, 1932 1,959,472 Hetfernan May 22, 1934 1,973,958 Jones Sept. 18, 1934 2,465,474 Peterson Mar. 29-, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US106773 *Aug 30, 1870 Improvement in tooth-picks
US236889 *Oct 30, 1880Jan 25, 1881 George hammee
US1047416 *Aug 31, 1910Dec 17, 1912Charles KatzenbergerComposition of matter for making formaldehyde candles.
US1507434 *Jan 17, 1921Sep 2, 1924Chem Fab Cothen Emil MInsecticide
US1609814 *Feb 2, 1925Dec 7, 1926Willard H GrayIncense burner
US1866931 *Feb 25, 1931Jul 12, 1932Heffernan Jr George FCharcoal block
US1959472 *May 6, 1932May 22, 1934Henry L DahmCharcoal briquette
US1973958 *Apr 1, 1931Sep 18, 1934 Incense buhner
US2465474 *Aug 24, 1946Mar 29, 1949Peterson Dell RFragrance emitting device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4099916 *Dec 2, 1976Jul 11, 1978Hindu IncenseIncense product
US4347217 *May 19, 1980Aug 31, 1982Genieco Inc.Incense holder
US5599360 *Dec 8, 1994Feb 4, 1997Stillman; Robert O.Method for the manufacture of char-containing articles
US6061950 *Jul 2, 1998May 16, 2000S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Burnable coil holder
US6440362 *Jan 18, 2000Aug 27, 2002S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Interconnectable fumigant
US7204864Jan 28, 2004Apr 17, 2007Stephens & Company, LlcCombustible product and package
US7823576Feb 18, 2008Nov 2, 2010William Kernie TimmonsConsumable charcoal starter
US20100316962 *Jun 10, 2009Dec 16, 2010Heidi Elise NewellMethod for embodying an incense-coated template in variety of ornate and complex designs or patterns
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/40, 44/522, 422/126
Cooperative ClassificationA01N25/20