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Publication numberUS2771198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1956
Filing dateAug 31, 1950
Priority dateAug 31, 1950
Publication numberUS 2771198 A, US 2771198A, US-A-2771198, US2771198 A, US2771198A
InventorsIra Danchig
Original AssigneePeter Fries Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Counting and sorting device
US 2771198 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Naw. 29, 195.6 1 DANCHIG Zyg COUNTING AND SORTING DEVICE Filed Aug. 51, 195o 2 sheets-sheet 1 Q I 1MM @D Qi@ lll laf

L\\\\\\\2\2\ IVEN v IRA N e El BY 'R ATTORNEY vNaw., Z, 1956 l, @ANCI-HG Esg COUNTING AND SORTING DEVICE Filed Aug. 5l, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

IRA DAN'CHIG BY ATTORNEY CoUNTrNG AND sonrlNG DEVICE Ira Danchig, New York, N. Y., assignor of fifty percent to Peter Fries, fir., New York, N. Y.

Applicah'on August 31, 1950, Serial No. 182,522

4 Claims. (Cl. 214-1) This invention relates to sorting and counting devices and apparatus.

An object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved counting and sorting apparatus and device whereby a plurality of discrete objects or particles may be counted and or sorted quickly and easily, Without the use of complicated apparatus.

Another object of the invention is t-o provide novel and improved counting and sorting apparatus in which there is an object receiving device adapted to receive a plurality of discrete objects to be counted and or sorted, and means in said object receiving device whereby individual ones of said plurality `of discrete yobjects may be received, one object in each individual means, whereby counting thereof may be carried out by immediate inspection.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved counting and sorting device which is equipped with a plurality of object-receiving recesses, each of the recesses being constructed according to a novel pattern, so that upon dumping a plurality of discrete or separate objects into the device, they are automatically caused to arrange themselves so that only one such object lies lin each of the object receiving recesses, Ithe recesses being arranged according to a novel pattern, so that by visual inspection, taking into account the unfilled recesses, or the filled recesses, as convenient, the exact quanti-ty of the objects dumped therein being instantly ascertained without going through the process of counting them individually, and Without the need for handling them individually.

Still another object of the invention is to provide novel article or object counting means which is adapted for counting not only such articles or discrete objects of a predetermined specific size or diameter, by the construction shown and described herein, but is also adapted to count `or sort such articles or objects of a range of different sizes.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide novel article and object counting means of the character escribed, which is useful in counting and sorting pharmaceutical products such as pills, tablets, capsules and the like, of a range of sizes and diameters.

Another object of the invention is to provide a novel article and object counting device of the character described, which is sanitary for use in handling pharmaceutical products, such that there will be no contamination of such products While being processed therein.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel article and object counting and sorting device of the character described, which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, and effective and efficient in ilse.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a part hereof, and in which,

Figure l is a top plan view of one form of the device, with the top closure and divider not shown.

Figure 2 is a sectional elevational view taken substan atent rice tially on plane 2 2 of Figure 1, the top closure and divider being shown in one position.

Figure 3 is a sectional elevational view taken substantially on plane 3-3 of Figure 1, lthe top closure and divider being likewise illus-trated in the view.

Figure 4 is a top plan View of the device shown in Figures l, 2 and 3, but showing it with its top closure and divider in position, and retracted to normally closed rightward position.

Figure 5 is a top plan view of a modified form of the invention, preferred for use with capsules and similar elongated articles, with the top closure and divider not shown.

Figure 6 is a sectional elevation taken on plane 6 6 of Figure 5, with the top closure and divider in one position, and illustrating the positions occupied by large size capsules when poured into the device from a bottle shown to the right; a small size capsule is also shown in this View.

Figure 7 is a sectional elevational view taken on plane 7--7 of Figure 6, one capsule being shown, the view being fragmentary.

Figure 4 represents the appearance of both yforms of the device, that is, of Figures l and 5, when the top closure is in posit-ion and moved to closed position.

ln connection with work on pharmaceutical products, such as pills, tablets, capsules and the like, it is frequently necessary to determine quickly and accurately, the number of such pills, tablets, capsules, and the like, poured out of a larger container or bottle thereof, or for other purposes. Thus, for example, the pharmacist may have to make up a prescription which calls for ten capsules, pills or tablets. The capsules may commonly be contained in a large jar or bottle, and to take out exactly ten capsules therefrom would necessitate handling them while counting out the exact number desired. For sanitary reasons, among others, it is desirable to avoid as much as possible actual physical handling of 4individual pills, tablets or capsules.

The present invention provides means by which the pharmacist or other person may assort, count or enumerate .any given quantity of discrete objects, such, for example, as pills, tablets or capsules, quickly, and without actually touching the objects at all during the counting process. He maiy either count the exact lnumber of such pills in a bottle 0r jar, for example, or may count out from the bottle, jar, or other container or a pile thereof, any predetermined quantity of such pills, capsules or tablets, with great facility and convenience.

In order to understand clearly the nature of the invention, and the best means for carrying it out, reference may now be had to the drawings, in which like reference numerals denote similar parts throughout the several views.

As shown, there is a main housing generally indicated at 2t), and having a bottom wall 22, upstanding side walls 24 and 26 secured to the bottom wall, and interconnecting end Walls 2S and 30 similarly secured to the bottom wall and to the side walls. The bottom, end and side walls thus define a housing main chamber or compartment 32, which extends the entire length and breadth of the main housing. Inside the main chamber, is disposed `an objectreceiving matrix member 34, which, as shown, has its bottom surface 36 lying against the upper surface of the bottom wall 24 of the main housing. The edges 38, 4t), 42 and 4% of the matrix member 34 lie snugly against the corresponding inner Wall surfaces of the walls 24, 25, 28 and 30 of the main housing, and may be secured adhesively or in any other manner in position, so as to be stationary relative thereto.

In the upper surface 46 of the matrix vmember 34, I form a number of recesses 48, which are upwardly open,

to receive the objects tobe sorted out or counted, such, for example, as pills or tablets. Such pills or tablets may be shaped with cylindrical side walls, as shown at 50, being circular in plan as seen in Figure 1. The diameters of the pills 50 may vary, and the device shown can accommodate a range of diameters of pills. For this purpose, I do not make the recesses cylindrical, but make them stepped as shown. For example, the walls of the recesses slope inwardly convergently conically downwardly, from level 52 to level 54, to accommodate pills o f the size shown at 50 in Figure 2, for example. Thence the walls of the recesses slope conically downwardly convergently inwardly from level S4 to level 56, being thus progressively smaller in cross section. This accommodates between levels 54 and 56, smaller diameter pills. The lowermost portion 58 of the recesses is still smaller in diameter, being conveniently hemi-spherical in shape and progressing downwardly to a lower level 60.

By merely pouring some pills out of a bottle or jar of pills, into the housing chamber 32, it will be found that the pills will tend to enter the pill receiving recesses 48, one pill in each recess. The marginal surfaces or border 62 of the matrix member also slope inwardly down wards to the level 46, so that lany pills that impinge thereon are urged toward the pill receiving recesses and do not pile up there.

A top wall member 64 has an end wall 66 depending from one end thereof, and into the chamber 30 to slide over the upper surface of the matrix member 34. It also has depending side walls 68 and 70 which are receptive on their ribs 72 into the grooves 74 in the housing walls so as to slide thereon.

The walls 64, 68, 70 and 66, being thus secured together, form a movable unit which may be moved from left to right and back again in the directions of the ar row 80 shown in Figure 2, to bring the ldepending wall 66 right against the lower housing right end wall 30, as seen best in Figure 4, this being the retracted position, or to move it all the way to the left so that it is in contact with the left end wall 28 of the lower housing. Also, it may be moved so that the dividing wall 66 is in any intermediate position therebetween, as for example shown in Figure 2. When in this position of Figure 2, it is seen that the right hand ten pill receiving recesses 48 remain exposed for receiving pills from a bottle or other container, to be shaken from the bottle right into the remaining exposed portion of the lower housing, in the direction of the arrow 82 in Figure 2. When the pharmacist does this, he will find that the pills 50 will tend to each occupy one of 4the recesses 48, and to urge them rto do so individually, all he has to do is mildly shake the housing from side to side to mildly agitato the pills 50. By inspection, the pharmacist can see whether any of the ten openings 48 is not occupied by a pill, andifso, and he wants to count out ten pills, then he merelyshakes one'or more pills into the housing -to make up the required ten. If he wants only eight pills, then he pours pills slowly from the bottle until all but two of the recesses are occupied by pills 50, which is obvious by inspection.

If he wants only tive pills, then he moves his dividing slider assembly comprising the wall 66, top 64 and anges 68 and 70, a little further to the right so that only the rightwardmost column 84 of recesses 48 is exposed, and it will be found quite simple for the pharmacist to pour exactly live pills into the housing. Although each column is shown with five pill receiving recesses, it is apparent that some other number of recesses, such as six or seven, or ten, may be formed in the matrix 34 instead of live, for some special purpose, and similarly, although only ten such columns are shown, there may be a greater or lesser number of such columns. However, I have found that the arrangement shown is convenient for ordinary purposes and simple for counting by inspection.

Once `the required number of pills has been poured into the lower housing, they can be discharged therefrom by merely pouring them out again, across either of the corners 86 or 88, and it is seen that one or both of these corners may be formed to simulate a pouring spout on a beaker, if desired, to even further facilitate such pouring into some other container.

Figure 2 shows one size of pill at 50, which extends partly inside the recess 48 at the right, Where smaller diameter pills are being used, or smaller diameter spherical pills, they will necessarily extend further toward the bottom of the recess 48, and the smallest size will come in contact with the rounded lowermost portion 58 of the recesses.

Looking now at Figures 5, 6 and 7, it is seen that the construction of the device shown there is similar to that of the preceding iigures, except that the recesses 100, though also stepped or sloping inwardly, are elongated to receive the elongated capsules 102. The elongated capsule-receiving recesses have their end walls or surfaces 104 and 106 sloping inwardly convergently downwardly from level 108 to level 110, to accommodate capsules of the size shown at 102, for example, and are progressively further sloping downwards from level 110 to 112, and again progressively further sloping downwards from level 112 to level 114, each additional sloping portion permitting reception of a smaller length capsule. Thus, in Figure 6, there is shown a very small capsule 102e lying at the bottom level of the capsule-receiving recess row 116, vthis being shown only for illustration, since normally only one size of capsule at a time will be poured into the lower housing, and it would normally be on the right side of the stop wall 66a.

As mentioned for Figures l, 2, 3 and 4, the depending divider wall 66a moves as a unit with the walls' 64a, 68a and 70a, from left to right and vice versa, in the directions of the arrow 118. All parts of Figures 5, 6 and 7 which are similar to `those of the preceding views, are given the same numerals with the addition of the suilix a. Looking at the cross sectional views in Figure 7, it is seen that the side surfaces and 122 of the capsule receiving recesses 100 are also inwardly downwardly convergent from their uppermost level 108 to their lowermost level 114, and that the contour may be stepped if desired, depending upon the particular range and sizes of capsules which are to be accommodated therein.

As stated previously for the round and spherical pills, the pharmacist may pour the capsules 102 from a jar or bottle in the direction -of arr-ow 1.32, the divider unit depending wall 66a having previously been positioned to expose to the right thereof, only the desired number of capsule-receiving openings 100 corresponding to the number of capsules to be counted thereby. In Figures 5 and 6, the divider 66a is so positioned as to permit counting of ten or less capsules 102, or the smaller capsules such as 102m The capsules having been poured into the housing chamber 32a in the direction of arrow 132, while the pharmacist mildly shakes the housing 20a, the capsules are jai-red so as to move into the individual openings 100, one capsule in each opening. The upper edges 134 of the capsule receiving recesses, and the upper edges 136 of the pill receiving recesses of Figure l may be slightly rounded oft to further facilitate the entry therein of the capsules or pills as the case may be.

A It will be understood that the capsules 102 which have now been counted out into the recesses 100, may then be poured out into a pill box or capsule box, or other container or envelope as desired, across the corners 86a or 88a thereof. The corners 86a and 88a may be formed outstanding like a spout, to facilitate the pouring into a given form of container if desired. It will also be understood that the walls such as 22, 24, 26, 28, 30 and even the matrix 34 may be formed of a single piece of molded material such as plastic, and similarly the movable Walls 64, 66, 68 and 70 may be cast as a plastic unit if desired. It will also be understood that the same device may be used alternately for pills or capsules, by merely making the matrix units 34 and 150 interchangeable.

Although I have described my invention in specilic terms, it will be understood that various changes may be made in size, shape, materials and arrangement without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A counting and sorting device comprising a housing having a recess formed therein defined by upstanding enclosing side walls, matrix means in said recess, with a plurality of article receiving compartments formed in a surface of said matrix means, said article receiving compartments being constructed and arranged to receive one said article in each article receiving compartment, each of said article receiving compartments being circular in plan, and having inwardly downwardly convergent wall surfaces lying in an imaginary cone of one altitude, and other portions lof said inwardly downwardly convergent wall surfaces lying in at least one imaginary cone of a different altitude, said compartments being vertically differentially stepped to form seats for articles yof differing cross sections, and means including an outstanding wall adjustably limiting the total number Iof article receiving compartments opening for the reception `of said articles.

2. A counting and sorting device comprising la housing having a recess formed therein defined by upstanding enclosing side walls, matrix means in said recess, with a plurality of article receiving compartments formed in a surface of said matrix means, said `article receiving compartments being constructed and arranged to receive one said article in each article receiving compartment, each of said article receiving compartments being trough-like in contour, being elongated longitudinally, with substantially rounded end wall surfaces, and means including an outstanding wall for adjustably limiting the total number of article receiving compartments opening for the reception of said articles.

3. A counting and sorting device comprising a housing having a recess formed therein defined by upstanding enclosing side walls, matrix means in said recess, with a plurality of article receiving compartments formed in a surface of said matrix means, said article receiving compartments being constructed and arranged to receive one said article in each article receiving compartment, each of said article receiving compartments being an elongated trough constructed and arranged to receive therein at least -a portion of a range of sizes of capsules, and means inclu-ding an outstanding wall for adjustably limiting the total number of article receiving compartments opening for the reception of said articles.

4. A counting and sorting device comprising a housing having a recess formed therein defined by upstanding enclosing side walls, matrix means in said recess, with a plurality of article receiving compartments formed in a surface of said matrix means, said article receiving compartments being constructed and arranged to receive one said article in each article receiving compartment, each of said article receiving means and compartments forming an elongated trough-like depression with downwardly inwardly convergent end Wall surfaces, and inwardly downwardly convergent side wall surfaces, so as to define a progressively inwardly diminishing cross sectional area `of the depression, so that the smallest size lof capsule will lie upon the lower surface of said depression, upon entering the same, and so that progressively larger sizes of capsules entering said trough-like depression will have surfaces `of said capsules supported therein at an elevation above said lower surface of said depression, and means including an outstanding wall for adjustably limiting the total number of -article receiving compartments opening :tor the reception of said articles and capsules.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,422,584 Rickard .Tune 17, 1947 2,483,207 Joseph Sept. 27, 1949 2,527,694 Bejcek Oct. 31, 1950 2,536,127 De Philip s- Ian. 2, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 19,326 Great Britain Sept. 15, 1908

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422584 *Apr 13, 1946Jun 17, 1947Rickard Jr GlennCounting device
US2483207 *Jun 29, 1945Sep 27, 1949Jerome RubensMachine for counting and bottling pellets and the like
US2527694 *Jul 5, 1947Oct 31, 1950Bejcek Edwin LCapsule counter
US2536127 *Mar 24, 1948Jan 2, 1951De Philip Joseph RTablet counter and dispenser
GB190819326A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2863572 *Jul 23, 1957Dec 9, 1958Bethard William FDevice for counting pills
US4213730 *Mar 7, 1979Jul 22, 1980Gaetano Nicholas A DiDevice for use in counting small items
US4901865 *Dec 23, 1988Feb 20, 1990Eli Lilly And CompanyCapsule-inspection apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/675
International ClassificationA61J7/00, A61J7/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61J7/02
European ClassificationA61J7/02