Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2771209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1956
Filing dateAug 2, 1951
Priority dateAug 2, 1951
Publication numberUS 2771209 A, US 2771209A, US-A-2771209, US2771209 A, US2771209A
InventorsFlynn John B
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ash tray
US 2771209 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. B. FLYNN Nov. 20, 1956 ASH TRAY 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 2, 1951 Bummer 475i)? '1 I attorney ASH TRAY Filed Aug. 2, 1951 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 (Ittoruegd United States Patent ASH TRAY John B. Flynn, Detroit, Mich., assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Application August 2, 1951, Serial No. 239,943

3 Claims. (Cl. 220-18) The present invention relates to receptacles for ashes and other waste material and more particularly to pivotally mounted ash trays of the flush type commonly used in automotive vehicles.

In ash trays employed in automotive vehicles it is desirable to provide some means for covering the receptacles in the ash tray to prevent the ashes and other refuse from being blown and scattered throughout the interior of the vehicle. It is also desirable to design the ash tray in such a manner as to permit ready removal of the receptacle thereof for eliminating its contents and for cleaning of said receptacle. However, due to the large amount of vibration inherent in a moving vehicle, unless the ash tray is fitted tightly there will be a considerable amount of objectionable rattling of the receptacle which may be shaken loose thus spilling the contents of the receptacle and even causing separation of the said receptacle from its frame. Several attempts have been made to overcome these objections by designing tight fitting drawers or receptacles and also by providing some form of elaborate spring arrangement to hold the drawer or receptacle in place. Although such constructions may prevent rattles, binding of the drawers occur causing them to become difficult to operate. In addition, due to the relatively heavy load on the bearing surfaces, when the drawer or receptacle is opened or closed objectionable grating or squeaking occurs as well as excessive wear on the parts.

it is an object of the present invention to provide a highly improved ash tray which is so designed as to overcome the above referred to objectionable features inherent in the present structures.

Another object is to provide an improved and novel ash tray of the flush type having means for effectively retaining the drawer or receptacle thereof in an open or closed position without causing excessive binding of the parts.

A further object is to provide an ash tray which is easy to move to its different positions and wherein the parts thereof are not subjected to excessive wear.

A more specific object is to provide an improved ash tray comprising a mounting bracket adapted for attachment to the back of a seat or to the instrument panel of a motor vehicle, a tiltable receptacle detachably mounted on said bracket, retaining means for holding said receptacle in open and closed positions and latch means for detachably securing said receptacle to said bracket.

A still further object is to provide a highly improved ash tray which is simple in structure and economical to manufacture.

Other and further objects, advantages, and meritorious features of the present invention will become apparent from the following specification, appended claims, and accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a traverse sectional elevational view of the ash tray taken substantially along line 11 of Fig. 3 showing the receptacle or drawer in a closed position.

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the receptacle or drawer of the ash tray in the open position.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the ash tray looking in the direction of the arrows along line 33 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a transverse sectional elevational view taken substantially along line 44 of Fig. 3 and,

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of a portion of the mounting frame of the ash tray.

Referring to the drawings, the ash tray is indicated generally by the letter A and consists of two separable parts, the drawer or receptacle 1 and the mounting frame or bracket 2. The mounting frame or bracket 2 is outwardly dished and generally rectangular in shape. The face of frame 2 has provided therein a substantially rectangular opening 3 for receiving the drawer or receptacle. The mounting frame is attached to a wall or partition 4 such as the vehicle dashboard or the back of an automobile seat by any suitable means such as screws 5. As shown in Figs. 1 and 5, screws extend through aligned openings 6 provided in the face of the frame and in a U-shaped bracket 8 secured to the back of the said frame by rivets 10 or by any other suitable means. The face of the frame is depressed or recessed as shown at 12 to receive the inner surface 14 of the drawer. The outer surface of the drawer is thus substantially flush with the frame proper when the said drawer is closed. By locating the openings 6 in the recessed portion of the frame the heads of screws 5 will be concealed when the drawer is closed. The U-shaped brackets 8 function to prevent lateral movement of the frame 2 and also to facilitate alignment of the screws with openings in the wall to which the tray is to be attached during installation thereof.

Each bracket 8 has extending laterally from the lower end thereof a convex bearing member 16 which in assembly engages the concave bearing portion 18 provided near the lower front end of the receptacle 1 and rotatably supports the latter during its movements between open and closed positions. The bearing members 16 extend across the lower corners of the opening 3 and a portion of each extends forwardly through said opening. For convenience and economy in manufacture the bearing members 16 are shown as being integral with brackets 8 although they may be constructed separately if desired and secured to the frame 2 in any suitable manner.

The opening 3 is formed by partially severing a rectangular portion 20 of the frame by a stamping operation. The portion 20 is completely severed from the frame 2 along its lower and side edges, and inwardly along its top edge leaving an intermediate portion 22. integral with the frame proper. The portion 20 is then bent inwardly along intermediate portion 22 and is curved about a transverse horizontal axis so as to assume a position substantially concentric wtih bearing members 16. The purpose of portion 20 is two fold, it forming a cover for the open end of receptacle 1 and also operates as a resilient retaining means for the said receptacle. Before severing the cover 20 from the frame 2 as just described, and during the forming of the depression 12 in the face of said frame, three substantially vertical depressions 24, 26 and 28 are formed therein. Depressions 24 and 28 form downwardly extending projections while the projection 26 forms a relatively broad upwardly extending projection when the cover 20 is bent inwardly as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 4. Projections 24 and 28 taper forwardly from a point spaced inwardly from the lower or rear edge 30 of cover 20 and from shoulders 32 and 34, respec-- tively, for engaging rounded projections 36 and 38 on receptacle 1 to retain the latter in closed position as will later appear. Projection 26 forms a stiffening rib for the cover 20 and has formed near the front or upper end thereof a struckdown lug 40, which as will presently ap-- pear, is adapted to engage a latch 42 provided on receptacle 1 to' prevent complete separation of the receptacle 1 from the frame 2.

The drawer or receptacle 1 is of box like construction "and comprises substantially parallel front and rear walls extending flanges 54 and 56, respectively, around theperimeters thereof. The portion 58 of flanges S4 and S6 overlies the rear and bottom walls 46 and 48 and are secured thereto by soldering or by any other suitable means. The portion 60 of flanges 54 and 56 lying adjacent front wall 44 are curved vertically to conform with the curvature of said front wall and are secured thereto by rivets 62. The concave bearing portion 18 terminates at the front end thereof in a substantially vertical flange 64 and is secured to said front wall by tongues 66 struck from the lower edge of said front wall and bent into locking engagement with said flange. The upper edges'68 and 70 of end walls 50 and 52 are of convex construction and are disposed in substantially concentric relation with bearing portion 18. The portion 72 of flanges 54 and 56 disposed along the upper edges 68 and 70, respectively, terminate at their inner ends in the rounded projections 36 and 38, which it will be remembered are adapted to engage the projections 24 and 28 on resilient cover 20 during movement of the receptacle 1 toward open and closed position. When the receptacle is fully closed, the projections 36 and 38 are resiliently held by cover 20 in engagement with the retaining shoulders 32 and 34 respectively. The receptacle is thus effectively held in closed position.

The front wall 44 of receptacle 1 has extending across the upper end thereof, a handle 74. Handle 74 is provided with an overhanging flange 76 which may be engaged by the fingers of the operator to open or close the receptacle. Handle 74 is secured to the front wall and to the adjacent flange portions 60 of flanges 54 and 56 by the rivet-like projections 62 which after being inserted through aligned opening in said front wall and said flange portions 60 are peened over as shown more particularly in Fig. 4.

The front wall is dished outwardly slightly forming a narrow inwardly extending flange 78, which when the receptacle is in closed position, as shown in Fig. 4, engages the inner wall of the depression 12 and consequently the outer surface thereof is substantially flush with the outer portion of frame 2.

It will be observed that the lower end 82 of the frame 2 is of greatest width which becomes progressively narrower toward the upper end 84 forming a frame structure which is substantially triangular in cross-section. The frame 2 is so constructed to compensate for the downwardly sloping contour of the back of the seat to which it is attached. By so constructing the frame 2 the front wall 44 of the receptacle will assume a substantially vertical position when the said receptacle is in closed position, as shown in Fig. 4. When in the open position shown in Fig. 2 the receptacle 1 is still in a substantially upright position and consequently the contents therein will not spill onto the floor of the vehicle.

Latch 42 comprises a hat downwardly extending portion 86, an intermediate portion 88 bent into the form of a loop and a forwardly extending arm or tongue portion 90. Portion 86 is secured to rear wall 46 by any suitable means such as by a rivet 92. The intermediate portion 88 of latch 42 extends through a recess 94 provided in the upper end of the rear wall 46 of receptacle 1 and forms a locking detent adapted to engage shoulder or lug 40 provided in cover 20 to thereby prevent separation'of the said receptacle from the frame 2. The forwardly extending arm or tongue portion of latch 42 provides anope'ra'ting means for the said latch and when depressed the detent 88 is moved clear of lug 40 and the receptacle may then be lifted from frame 2. When the pressure on operating arm or tongue 90 is relieved the latch 42 springs upwardly to normal position. Accordingly, when the receptacle is rocked inwardly, detent 88 will ride on the inclined undersurface 96 of lug 40, thereby compressing detent 88 until the latter moves over the inner edge of lug 40 when the detent springs into engagement therewith. The receptacle 1 is now locked to frame 2 and can be separated therefrom only by depressing arm 90 and lifting the said receptacle from the said frame.

The handle 74 has formed thereon an arm 98 which when assembled on front Wall 44 extends through a slot provided near the upper end of the latter. A countersunk opening 102 is provided near the inner end of arm 98. The arm 98 with the opening at the inner end thereof provides a snuffer for extinguishing lighted cigarettes or cigars before they are deposited in the receptacle 1.

From the foregoing description, it is seen that in order to assemble the receptacle and frame, the receptacle is tilted forwardly and the concave bearing portion 18 thereof is then seated on hearing members 16. The receptacle is then rocked inwardly about its pivot causing detent 88 of latch 42 to ride over the inclined surface 96 of lug 40 until it clears the inner edge thereof, when the said detent springs into locking engagement with said lug. The receptacle is now locked with frame 2. By pushing receptacle further inward the rounded projections 36 and 38 will ride over the tapered projections 24 and 28 on cover 20 against the resilient action of the latter until the said projections 36 and 38 clear the end of projections 24 and 28. The cover 20 then snaps downwardly causing projections 36 and 38 to be resiliently held against shoulders 32 and 34, respectively, and thereby securely retaining the receptacle in closed position. When the receptacle is opened projections 36 and 38 cam cover 20 upward until they clear shoulders 32 and 34 and then ride over the tapered projections 24 and 28 until detent 88 strikes lug 40. During movement of the receptacle in this manner the projections 36 and 38 lift the cover 20 tending to bend the ends thereof about the integral portion 22 thereby placing the said cover under tension both sidewise as well as rearwardly. Consequently, resilient pressure is exerted on the projections 36 and 38 which tends to swing the receptacle 1 outwardly thus urging the detent 88 into engagement with lug 40. The frictional contact between cover 20 and the projections 36 and 38 firmly hold the receptacle in open position and prevents rattling thereof due to vibrations occurring during operation of the vehicle. As the receptacle 1 is moved from fully open position shown in Fig. 4 toward closed position, the friction between cover 20 and lugs 36 and 38 is somewhat relieved thereby facilitating the movement thereof to closed position. As the projections 36 and 38 approach the inner ends of the tapered projections 24 and 28 the frictional contact therebetween increases until the projections 36 and 38 clear the ends of said projections 24 and 28 when the cover snaps down causing projections 36 and 38 to lodge tightly against shoulders 32 and 34, thereby effectively holding the receptacle in closed position, as previously described. The desired degree of friction between cover 20 and projections 36 and 38 is attained by varying the curvature of said cover and also by predetermining the width of the intermediate integral portion 22 connecting the cover to the frame 2. The greater the width of portion 22 the greater will be the resilient force imposed on the projections 36 and 38 by cover 20.

It therefore is seen that a simplified and highly improved ash tray has been provided. Simplified and effective means have been provided for retaining the receptacle in open and closed positions in such a manner that undesirable rattling of the parts does not occur. Means have also been provided to enable ready removal of the receptacle from the frame for emptying the contents thereof and for cleaning purposes. The wear on the parts due to frequent operation of the receptacle to its different positions is also reduced to a minimum.

While but a single embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein, it is apparent that modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention. It therefore is to be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment described herein but only by the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is:

1. An ash tray comprising a frame having a receptacle receiving opening provided therein, bearings mounted on said frame adjacent said opening, an arcuate cover having the forward side thereof secured to said frame to position said cover substantially concentric with said bearings, a forwardly tapering projection extending along each of the opposite ends of said cover away from said forward side to form wear receiving means, said projections terminating adjacent the rear side of said cover to form shoulder means in substantial alignment with said wear receiving means, said cover having slots extending inwardly from each of said ends adjacent said frame to permit relative movement between said ends and said frame so that said wear receiving means may be resiliently deflected over their entire length, and a receptacle pivotally mounted on said bearings for swinging movement into and out of said opening, said receptacle having projections thereon positioned to slidably engage said means during movement of said receptacle.

2. An ash tray comprising a frame having a receptacle receiving opening provided therein, bearing means mounted on said frame adjacent said opening, a substantially cylindrical cover having the forward side thereof secured to said frame to position said cover substantially concentric with said bearing means, a forwardly tapered projection extending circumferentially along each of the opposite ends of said cover away from said forward side to form a pair of wear receiving surfaces, each of said projections terminating adjacent the rear side of said cover to form shoulder means, a stop extending downwardly from said cover adjacent said frame, said cover having slots extending axially inwardly from each of said ends towards the center of said cover, said slots being positioned adjacent said forward edge and between said Wear receiving surfaces and said frame, and a receptacle mounted on said bearings for swinging movement into and out of said opening, said receptacle having means disposed to slidably engage said wear receiving surfaces during movement of said receptacle, said means being positioned to engage said shoulder means when said receptacle is in the fully closed position, and a resiliently depressible detent on said receptacle being disposed in spaced relation to said cover and being positioned to normally engage said stop when said receptacle is in the fully open position.

3. An ash tray comprising a frame having a receptacle receiving opening provided therein, a receptacle positioned in said opening, cooperating trunnion means on said receptacle and said frame for permitting said receptacle to swing into and out of said openings, a substantially cylindrical cover having the forward side thereof secured to said frame adjacent said opening to position said cover substantially concentric'with said bearing means, forwardly tapering projections extending circumferentially along the opposite ends of said cover away from said forward side to form a pair of wear receiving surfaces, each of said projections terminating adjacent the rear side of said cover to form shoulder means, said receptacle having members projecting therefrom to slidably engage said wear receiving surfaces during movement of said receptacle into and out of said opening, said members being positioned to engage said shoulder means when said receptacle is in the fully closed position, a recess extending circumferentially along the center of said cover between said tapered projections, a stop extending from said cover into said recess adjacent said frame, said cover having slots extending axially inwardly from each of said ends towards said recess, said slots being positioned adjacent said forward edge and between said wear receiving surfaces and said frame, and a resiliently deflectable detent on said receptacle projecting into said recess in spaced relation to said cover and being positioned to normally engage said stop when said receptacle is in the fully opened position, said detent being adapted when depressed to permit said receptacle to swing out of said opening and be lifted clear of said trunnion means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,909,919 Testi May 16, 1933 2,048,363 Vogel July 21, 1936 2,068,999 Tierney Jan. 26, 1937 2,159,061 Visser May 23, 1939 2,196,648 Visser Apr. 9, 1940 2,261,698 Prance Nov. 4, 1941 2,294,173 Gillesse Aug. 25, 1942 2,301,715 Springer Nov. 10, 1942 2,330,417 Gillesse et al. Sept. 28, 1943 2,344,961 Benjamin Mar. 28, 1944 2,398,936 Hendricks Apr. 23, 194-6 2,548,533 Hendricks Apr. 10, 1951

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1909919 *Aug 12, 1932May 16, 1933Gillette Safety Razor CoSafety razor blade receptacle
US2049363 *May 26, 1934Jul 28, 1936Fetter Ralph SBarrel closure
US2068999 *Dec 5, 1935Jan 26, 1937Tierney Edward MCigarette extinguisher
US2159061 *Mar 29, 1935May 23, 1939John VisserAsh receiver
US2196648 *Mar 17, 1937Apr 9, 1940Jacobs Co F LAsh receptacle
US2261698 *Jun 9, 1938Nov 4, 1941Briggs Mfg CoAsh receiver and lamp assembly
US2294173 *Apr 26, 1939Aug 25, 1942Applied Arts CorpAsh receiver
US2301715 *Jul 31, 1939Nov 10, 1942Springer Ray WAsh receptacle
US2330417 *Dec 18, 1939Sep 28, 1943Applied Arts CorpAsh receiver
US2344961 *May 6, 1941Mar 28, 1944Benjamin Sidney HNonrefillable container
US2398936 *Jun 19, 1940Apr 23, 1946Applied Arts CorpAsh receiver
US2548533 *May 1, 1950Apr 10, 1951Applied Arts CorpAsh receiver
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3038629 *May 16, 1960Jun 12, 1962Morton Calvin LRetractable container and emptying tray therefor
US3315686 *Dec 31, 1964Apr 25, 1967Farhood Roland JWall-mountable ash receptacle
US3449011 *Jun 23, 1967Jun 10, 1969Artnell CoHead rest and waste container assembly
US4358149 *Oct 17, 1980Nov 9, 1982Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.Ash tray for vehicle
US4676544 *May 24, 1985Jun 30, 1987Gebr. Happich GmbhTiltable ashtray suitable for automotive vehicles
US4925072 *Jan 15, 1988May 15, 1990Itw-Ateco GmbhLocking mechanism for a pivotable closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/477, 296/37.9, 131/235.1, 220/478, 131/241
International ClassificationA24F19/00, A24F19/06
Cooperative ClassificationA24F19/06
European ClassificationA24F19/06