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Publication numberUS2772476 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1956
Filing dateMar 3, 1954
Publication numberUS 2772476 A, US 2772476A, US-A-2772476, US2772476 A, US2772476A
InventorsJack Glotzer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable grip and adjustable multiple fur slicer
US 2772476 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. GLOTZER Dec. 4, 1956 VARIABLE GRIP AND ADJUSTABLE MULTIPLE FUR SLICER 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 3, 1954 inns INVENTOR. JACK GLOTZER Dec. 4., 1956 J. GLOTZER 2,772,476

VARIABLE GRIP AND ADJUSTABLE MULTIPLE FUR SLICEIR Filed March 5, 1954- 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. JACK GLoT ZER BY J. GLOTZER Dec. 4, 1956 VARIABLE GRIP AND ADJUSTABLE MULTIPLE FUR .SLICER 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 5, 1954 INVENTOR. JACK GLOTZER VARIABLE GRIP AND ADJUSTABLE MULTIPLE FUR SLICER Jack Glotzer, New York, N. Y.

Application March 3, 1954, Serial No. 413,936

7 Claims. (Cl. 30-304) This invention relates to that type of multiple-bladed knife known as a fur slicer and, more particularly, refers to a hand fur slicer characterized by its versatility so far as is concerned first, the number of blades mountable therein, and second, the spacing between the blades so mounted.

A fur slicer of the multiple blade type permits one to make parallel cuts in a skin, with said cuts being adapted to define therebetween a piece to be arranged with others in the making of a coat or other garment. The cutting of a skin into strips is a hand operation and involves the exercise of a great amount of skill. This is due to the fact that the strips must be cut with full regularity, thus to allow their subsequent matching and connection when the garment is to be made. The strips, further, must be so cut as not to damage the fur, it being customary to cut the skins from the inside out with the knife being allowed to penetrate the same only to an extent sufficient to cut through the skin without cutting, in addition, the fur on the nether side thereof.

It is also necessary, in cutting skins into strips, that the strips be of selected widths, with each type of fur requiring a strip of a certain, predetermined width under ordinary circumstances. Thus, the distance between a pair of blades will be set at a predetermined figure when mink skins are being cut and will be set at a different figure when silver fox skins are cut, for example.

In view of the above, it is one important object of the present invention to provide a multiple blade fur slicer which will be readily adjustable so far as the distance between the blades thereof is concerned.

It is another important object to provide a slicer as described wherein the construction will allow the adjustment of said distance in such a way as to embody in the device means for making main adjustments found to be the most usual when skins of different types are being cut. In other words, it is proposed to so construct the slicer as to allow spacer blocks to be selectively employed in selected number and in selected sizes, with said blocks being formed in predetermined sizes found to be such as will insure the setting of the device at a proper position of adjustment when a certain kind of fur is being cut.

Another object is to provide a knife as stated in which a single tool can be adjusted to increase or decrease the number of blades being used, it being preferable that a greater number be used so as to permit a substantial number of cuts with a single stroke.

Another object is to provide a tool as stated which will not compel the cutter to spread his thumb and forefinger a half-inch as now required, when only a quarterinch is suiiicicnt for his purpose, thereby affording him an opportunity to relax and rest his fingers and thus maintain greater efficiency.

A further object is to provide a fur slicer in which the substitution of blades will be an easy, swiftly carried out operation. To change blades, the cutter need only turn a knurled nut 90 degrees in one direction and shake the device. The blades will drop out, and to insert new nite States Patent ice blades, the cutter need only place the blade on an inner blade clamp and with a guide block provided in the device, push the blade gently against the block until the blade reaches a stop pin. Then, by turning of the nut degrees in an opposite direction, the blades are clamped tightly in place and are ready for use. it. is not necessary to open the device to insert new blades. The only time the handle need be dismantled is when new spacers are inserted for new widths.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of r the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a fur slicer formed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a top plan view.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional view on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 4--4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view, the slicer being viewed from the side opposite that shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary top plan view showing the slicer adjusted to provide a greater width of strip to be cut.

Fig. 7 is a side elevational view in which one of the side plates has been swung downwardly from the other to better show the construction of both side plates.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view on line 8--8 of Fig. 2, showing an auxiliary spacer block.

Fig. 9 is an exploded perspective view of the device.

The multipleblade knife constituting the present invention includes a plurality of blade holder and spacer members confined between a pair of main or side plates 10, 12 formed with widened, transversely spaced heads tapering rearwardly to inwardly oflfset parts 14, 16 located intermediate opposite ends of the side plates, said offset parts merging into contacting, relatively narrow tail portions 18, 20 inclined upwardly in a direction away from the offset parts, at an angle of approximately 30 degrees from the horizontal. At their upper or outer ends the tail portions are pivotally connected by a bolt 22. The side plates are thus pivotally' joined at their rear ends, for relative swinging movement between operative positions shown in Pig. 1 and inoperative positions providing access to the space therebetween, shown to advantage in Figs. 7 and 9.

A main or support pin retainer 24 has a center boss integral with a plate portion 26 apertured at its opposite ends for extension of bolts 28, 3d therethrough. Bolts 28, 3t) fixedly connect the retainer to the outer surface of the widened head of the side plate 10, adjacent the top edge of said head. Bolts 28 and 30 are short bolts, extending only through threaded openings formed in the side plate It).

The center boss of the retainer 24 has an inwardly facing socket receiving a complementarily formed end of the main or support bolt 32. The socket-engaged end of the bolt 32, it may be noted, can be formed in any suitable manner that will insure its being fixedly secured within the retainer, and in the illustrated. example is noncircularly formed with the boss being provided with a socket of non-circular cross-section, the walls of which are crimped inwardly into the adjacent surfaces of the engaged support bolt.

For the greatest part of its length (Fig. 9) the shank of the main or support bolt is smooth-surfaced, but at its outer end, said bolt is threaded for a purpose to be made presently apparent.

Referring to Fig. 9, the widened head portions of the side plates taper toward the front end of the tool to form, on the respective plates fill, 12, tapered noses 34, 36 the front edges of which are cut away obliquely to the longitudinal center lines of the side plates as at 38, 42'). The bottom edge portions of said noses, similarly, are cut away as at 42, 44 to form downwardly facing recesses aifording clearance spaces for the blades to be carried in the tool.

Positioned flat against the inner surfaces of the tapered noses 34, 36 of the side plates are outer blade clamp plates 46. Plates 46 have top edges that are flush with the top edges of the nose portions of the side plates, but instead of cutting away the front edges of the outer clamp plates, said clamp plates are formed with pointed or triangular, forwardly projecting extensions 48 that extend beyond the obliquely out front edges 35, 4d. The bottom edges of the outer clamp plates, however, are cut away somewhat similarly to the corresponding portions of the side plates, to form downwardly facing recesses 50. Recesses 59 at their inner ends terminate short of the inner ends of the recesses 42, 44 of the side plates, as best shown in Fig. 7.

in the clamp plates 46, adjacent their top edges, there are formed openings 52 receiving the smooth-surfaced shank of the bolt 32. Openings 52 are disposed forward ly of and slightly below a rearwardly opening notch 54, that opens upon the back edge of the clamp plate adjacent side plate 10, to afford an opening for any protrusion of pin 30, and to enable the clamp plate to rest smoothly against side plate 10.

From the construction so far illustrated and described, it will be seen that the outer clamp plates are removably mounted upon the main bolt 32, and would ordinarily rock thereupon. However, the rocking of the clamp plates is prevented by a combined stop and spacer block to be described hereinafter.

Inner clamp plates are associated each with an outer clamp plate, and have been designated at 56. The inner clamp plates 56, as shown in Fig. 9, have top and back edges registering with the corresponding edges of the outer clamp plates, but the bottom edges of the inner clamp plates are not recessed. Rather, they are flush with the top or horizontal edges of the recesses S ll of the outer clamp plates, and continue along the same line fully to their back edges.

The inner and outer clamp plates are both suspended upon the main or support bolt 32, and accordingly, there are openings 60 in the inner plates registering with the openings 52 of the outer clamp plates (Fig. 9). Thus, both the inner and outer clamp plates are mounted upon the main bolt.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 3, and even more especially to Fig. 4, blades 62 are adapted to be clamped between the inner and outer clam-p plates, said blades comprising portions of conventional safety razor blades, cut diagonally as best shown in Fig. 4 and having inner side edges disposed against the bolt 32, and inner end edges positioned against the aforementioned combined stop and spacer block.

Between the inner clamp plates, there is disposed a spacer plate 64. This is of a selected width, found to be proper, when added to the thickness of the inner clamp plates, in cutting a strip of fur, not shown, to a selected width.

The spacer plate 64 has an opening 66 (Fig. 9) receiving the main bolt. The top edge of the spacer plate registers with the top edges of the side pla es and clamp plates. However, the front edge '79 of the spacer plate is cut away diagonally or obliquely even more than is the front edge of each side plate, thus to insure clearance space during the cutting of a strip and to insure, further, full and unimpeded observation of the strip being cut.

It is important to note that any number of spacer plates can be used. In Fig. 2, for example, a single plate 64 ,4 is employed. In Fig. 6, however, there is illustrated an arrangement wherein a pair of like, side-by-side plates 64 is mounted upon the main bolt in the space between the inner clamp plates. The angle of bend of side plates 10, 12, and the looseness of end bolt 22, permits the side plates to spring apart as necessary so as to increase to the necessary extent the space between the heads thereof, thus to accommodate spacer plates 64 of selected number and transverse dimension.

Further, although not shown, arrangements are possible wherein a greater number of blades 62 is used. For example, one could mount a third blade 62 between the two spacer plates 64 shown in Fig. 6. Or, another set of clamp plates might be mounted between said two spacer plates, with the third, medially located blade being mounted therebetween. Then again, four blades might be mounted between the side plates, the side plates being sprung apart as necessary and a selected number of inner and outer clamp plates, and spacer plates of selected numbet and thickness being positioned therebetween. The number and spacing of blades, as will be obvious, is limited only by the spread of the users thumb and forefinger and the strength of the hand.

The combined stop and spacer block previously mentioned herein has been designated by the reference numeral 72 and is mounted on the inner surface of the side plate 10. Block 72 has eounterbored openings 74 spaced longitudinally thereof, said openings receiving screws 76 whereby the block is secured to the side plate in. The screws 76 pass through openings '73 of said side plate (Figs. 4 and 5) to secure block 72 tightly.

An auxiliary spacer and stop block 80 is mounted on the inner surface of the side plate 12. As shown in Fig. 8, said block 86 has a pair of adjacent bolts 32 passed therethrough, the bolts extending through circular opening 86 of said block.

Normally, the block 80 would be disposed in an outof-the-way location, when a pair of closely spaced blades 62 are being used. However, if a greater space is to be provided between the blades, or if more than two blades are to be used, the block fit) is adjusted forwardly along the inner surface of the side plate 12, to a position shown in Fig. 6. In this position, block 80 is disposed in side-by-side relation with the block 72, the blocks 72, 80 contacting and cooperating to provide an abutment for the several spacer and clamp plates and supported blades.

To permit adjustment of block 80 longitudinally of side plate 12 to the operative and inoperative positions thereof, a slot 88 is formed in the side plate 12. Slot 88 is extended longitudinally of the widened part of the side plate, and is closed at its opposite ends to limit the longitudinal adjustment of the block 8t) in opposite directions. The bolts 82 pass through the slot.

The side plate 12, as previously noted herein, is swingable about the axis of the connecting pin 22. Accordingly, the top edge of said side plate 12 is provided with an upwardly opening notch 90. Notch 90 receives the main bolt 32, to allow the side plate to be swung be tween the positions shown in Figs. 1 and 9, respectively, and when the side plate 12 is in its Fig. 1. position, a spacer sleeve 94 mounted on the adjacent portion of the shank of bolt 32, can be bound thereagainst by turning home a knurled collar or out 96 threaded on said shank. In this way, the side plate is held against swinging movement to its Fig. 9 position, and the several blades, clamp plates, and spacer plates are all held in frictional engagement with one another in the space between the side plates.

Of course, when adjustments for strip width or adjustments for number of cuts are being made, the collar can be backed oil? readily to an extent sufficient to permit the adjustments to be made, after which the collar can be tightened against the spacer sleeve once again.

The spacer sleeve or washer 94 could be removed entirely in some instances, when the side plates are adjusted away from one another to their maximum extent.

From the above, it will be readily perceived that the tool has considerable versatility so far as both types of adjustments are concerned, thereby rendering unnecessary the keeping of a large number of slicing tools. It is important to note, in this regard, that if it becomes necessary to return the parts to a certain adjustment which was previously being used, the exact adjustment can be obtained once again, without difficulty, since the spacer plates are of a predetermined size. Regularity and uniformity of cut is thereby assured.

Apart from the above, however, there is an important characteristic, deriving from the particular shape of the several parts. It is to be noted that the tapering head portion has a gently curved top edge, inclined downwardly and forwardly in the direction of the material being cut to facilitate inspection of the material and of the cut. The device, it should be noted, is held with the side plates grasped between the thumb and index finger. Further, the inclination of the tail portions of the sideplates causes these parts to rest in the hollow of the hand, fully clear of the work.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that 1 do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1. A fur slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured on said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected distance apart, and a spacer block secured to one of said side plates for spacing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means.

2. A fur slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured to said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected distance apart, and a spacer block secured to one of said side plates for spacing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means, said spacer block having a flat surface extending the full distance between the side plates and engaging the blade clamp and spacer means.

3. A for slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured to said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected distance apart, a spacer block secured to one of said side plates for spac ing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means,

and an auxiliary spacer block movably mounted on the other side plate and including means to shift said block into side by side relation with the first named spacer block to increase the spacing between the side plates.

4. A fur slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured to said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected distance apart, a spacer block. secured to one of said side plates for spacing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means, and an auxiliary spacer block movably mounted on the other side plate and including means to shift said block into side by side relation with the first named spacer block to increase the spacing between the side plates, said other side plate having a longitudinal slot and said auxiliary block including supporting pins extending through the slot to mount the auxiliary block for slidable movement on said other side plate toward and away from the first named spacer block.

5. A fur slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured to said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected. distance apart, a spacer block secured to one of said side plates for spacing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means and having a fiat surface engagea'ble by the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means, and an auxiliary spacer block movably mounted on the other side plate and including slot means to shift said block into side by side relation with the first named spacer block to increase the spacing between the side plates, the auxiliary block having one surface disposed in a plane common to said surface of the first named block when the auxiliary block is shifted into side by side relation to the first named block.

6. A fur slicing hand tool of the multiple blade type comprising a pair of connected side plates spaced apart for at least part of their lengths, blade clamp means, means supporting said blade clamp means on said plates in the space therebetween, a blade retained between said clamp means, spacer means secured to said plates to dispose the blade clamp means a selected distance apart, a spacer block secured to one of said side plates for spacing the same apart in cooperation with said spacer means, said spacer block being disposed rearwardly of the blade clamp and spacer means to provide an abutment therefor and for said blade engaged by the blade clamp means, and an auxiliary spacer block movably mounted on the other side plate and including slot means to shift said block into side by side relation with the first named spacer block to increase the spacing between the side plates, the side plates being of springable characteristics so as to yield resiliently in a direction away from one another, thereby to permit said side plates to be sprung away a distance from one another equal to the combined thicknesses of the spacer blocks.

7. The combination of claim 3, wherein said auxiliary block shifting means comprises an elongated slot, and fastening means extending through said slot and secured in said auxiliary block to permit adjustment thereof.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,464,206 Becker Mar. 15, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2464206 *May 16, 1944Mar 15, 1949Mano E BeckerMultiple knife
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2962816 *Jul 7, 1959Dec 6, 1960 Glotzer
US3724071 *Feb 1, 1971Apr 3, 1973H HurtubiseCutting tool for pelts or the like
US4870756 *Jul 13, 1988Oct 3, 1989Burkhalter Alan JStrip cutter
US5353556 *Aug 21, 1990Oct 11, 1994Hand Herbert HMethod and apparatus for preventing crawling insects or other crawling pests from gaining access to plants
US5881463 *Nov 12, 1996Mar 16, 1999Orcon CorporationCarpet face cutter with coacting surfaces and cutouts for securing the lowermost corner of each cutter blade against deflection
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/304, 30/331
Cooperative ClassificationB26B3/04