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Publication numberUS2772674 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1956
Filing dateNov 25, 1953
Priority dateNov 25, 1953
Publication numberUS 2772674 A, US 2772674A, US-A-2772674, US2772674 A, US2772674A
InventorsEdward Swiech, Swiech Venans A
Original AssigneeEdward Swiech, Swiech Venans A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Orthopedic torsion leg brace
US 2772674 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1956 E. swEcH l-:TAL

ORTHOPEDIC ToRsIoN LEG BRACE Filed Nov 25, 1953 .n lf .0c Y l 4 M467 lO/,IZU mmmmdfm l l 5 l T 3 r C T 3. v 6 am A ...lll a 10M m 7% \m 2 Y (c. B u a 8 llll lr ..1 u1 mir-1 United States Patent ORTHOPEDIC TORSION LEG BRACE Edward Swiech and Venans A. Swiech, Seattle, Wash.

Application November 25, 1953, Serial No. 394,312

6 Claims. (Cl. 12S-80) This invention relates to an orthopedic torsion brace of a type adapted to be worn on the lower portion of the body to correct deformities of the muscles which control rotary or torsional movement of the legs and feet.

An object of this invention is to provide a brace by which an adjustable torsion in either direction may be exerted on one or both feet of the user to correct deformities or muscular weaknesses which cause either one or both of the feet to toe-out or toe-in to too great an extent.

This brace is primarily designed for use by spastic patients who have weakness in the muscles which control rotative positioning of the legs and feet but obviously it may be used in substantially all cases where correction in the rotative positioning of the legs and feet is required.

Another object of this invention is to provide an orthopedic torsion brace of this nature by which a constant but adjustable torsion is directly applied by helical torsion spring means to the part to be corrected without interferijngdwith movement of the leg joints or other parts of the Another object is to provide an orthopedic torsion brace having a waist encircling pelvic band or belt connected by torsion means, including at least one torsion spring with a lower leg brace which attaches to a shoe and further having devices for holding the torsion means in substantial alignment with and close to the leg, whereby the torsion is correctly and directly and constantly applied to the part to be corrected and whereby the torsion means is maintained in the most comfortable and out of the Way position for the user.

Other objects of this invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

Figure l is a front elevation of a torsion brace constructed in accordance with this invention and showing a duplex construction adapted for corrective use on both legs and feet of a patient.

Fig. 2 is a side view of this brace showing by dot and dash lines the outline of a patient to which thebrace is applied.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary View, partly in section and partly in elevation illustrating connecting means used between the ends of two spring members to form a bearing and to adapt the spring members for operation like a single spring.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view on broken line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation showing a modified form of lower leg brace which provides a pivot joint at the location of the ankle.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side view of a modified form of torsion brace constructed in accordance with this invention.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary side view of still another moditied form of torsion brace.

Fig. 8 is a plan view looking in the direction of broken line 8--8 of Fig. 7 and showing a calf engaging leg band of modified form. v

"ice

Like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the several views.

Figs. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate a preferred form of this invention comprising a pliable waist encircling pelvic band or belt 10 having adjustable fastening means 11 and having a plate 12, preferably of metal or like non-ilexible material secured thereto by rivets 13 and extending around the back and sides of said pelvic band. The band 10 may be made of leather and buckle type securing means is shown for this band.

The corrective devices which are shown in Fig. 1 as attached to the plate 12 at each side of the belt or pelvic band are of duplicate construction and the following description applies equally well to the corrective devices'at either side of said band 10. It will be understood that in instances where torsion is to be applied to the lower limbs at both sides of a patient then two sets of corrective devices will be provided, as shown in Fig. 1, but where correction is needed only at one side of the patient then only one set of corrective devices will be used.

Each set of corrective devices shown in Figs. l, 2 and 3 comprises a waist-to-hip plate 14 of metal or other fairly rigid material detachably secured as by screws 15 to the plate 12 of the pelvic band 10. The lower end of each waist-to-hip plate 14 is positioned substantially in transverse alignment with the hip joint of the patient when the torsion brace is in use and is connected by a pivot member 16 with a tting 17 which is tlxedly attached to the upper end portion of a torsion spring 18. The lower end portion of the torsion spring 18 is Xedly attached to the upper end portion of another torsion spring 19, see Fig. 3, by a short bearing rod 20. The rod 20 has two end portions 21 of lenlarged diameter which telescope into the adjacent ends of the springs 18 and 19 and are se cured to said springs 18 and 19 as by silver soldering these enlarged end parts 21 to the springs. This, in effect, attaches the two springs 18 and 19 together so that, functionally, they constitute a single spring member with a bearing intermediate its length.

The short bearing rod 20 is rotatively supported in a bearing clip 22 which is secured by screws 23 or like means to a plate 24 on the side of the thigh encircling upper leg band 25. Preferably the clip 22 is shaped as shown in Fig. 4 so that it is easily applied to and detached from the bearing rod 20. Detachable fastening means, shown as a strap 26 and buckle 27 is provided on each thigh encircling band 25. Preferably the springs 1S and .19 have elastic tubes 18' and 19 fitted thereover as a protective covering. These elastic tubes are shown partially broken away in Figs. 1 and 2.

The lower end portion of the spring 19 is provided with a fitting 28 which is rigid with the spring and is attached by screws 29 to the upper end portion of a lower leg brace 30. Preferably the screws 29 also attach both the fitting 28 and the lower leg brace 30 to a metal plate 31 on the side of a calf engaging leg band 32 of leather or like pliable material. A vbuckle 33 and a strap 34 may be used as adjustable and detachable fastening means for the calf engaging lower leg band 32. This calf engaging lower leg band 32 can be of semicircular shape, like the leg band 60 shown -in Figs. 7 and 8 and hereinafter described. Its function is to hold the parts 19 and 30 in place alongside of the leg and at the same time allow the torsion of spring means 18, 19 to be exerted on the lower leg brace 30. The lower end of the lower leg brace 30 is provided with shoe attachment means. The shoe attachment means shown in Figs. l and 2 is a caliper pin 35 perpendicular to the leg brace 30 and tting within a tubular receptacle 36 which is secured to the shoe 37, a fragment of this receptacle 36 being shown in section in Fig. 1. The shoe 37 is shown by dot and dash lines in Fig. 2. This shoe 37 is provided at its top with a strap 38 which may be applied outside of the leg brace 3l) so that it helps to hold the leg brace 31D `close to the leg.

In the operation of the torsion brace shownin Figs. 1, 2 and 3 the brace is applied as shown in Fig. 2. The pivot 16 will be positioned substantially in transverse alignment with the hip joint and this permits free hip joint movement, for instance in leaning forward, as illustrated in Fig. 2, or in sitting down. The thigh encircling upper leg band 25 is positioned well above the knee and the torsion spring means 18, 19 is rotatively supported and held against sidew-ise movement and close to the leg by this thigh encircling band. rl`he lower spring member 19 permits freedom of movement or" the knee joint in spanning this joint. The calf engaging member 32 holds the `spring 19 and upper end portion of the lower leg brace 30 inrproper alignment with the leg and close lto the leg and at the same time does not interfere with the eiective application of spring torsion to the lower leg bra-ce 30.

In applying this torsion brace to the user the required initial torsion to hold the foot and leg in a desired angular position may be imparted to the spring 18, 19 after the pelvic band and thigh encircling band 25 have been fastened but before the calf engaging band 32 is applied to the leg. This may be done by axially turning the lower leg brace 30 the desired amount either while said leg brace is removed from the shoe or while it is attached to the shoe and before the foot is placed in the shoe. If a half turn of the spring in either direction is desired to obtain the correct amount of torsion the screws 29 may be removed, the fitting 28 rotated one half turn and the screws 29 replaced. The springs 18 and 19 preferably are substantially closed coil springs, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. These springs can be made to exert the desired torsion irrespective of whether they are twisted in a direction which tends to wind up the coils or to unwind the coils. The pelvic band 10 is the anchor means which resists the torsion transmitted by the springs 18 and 19 to the lower leg and foot and it does not occasion any discomfort to the user. The springs 18 and 19, being closely wound, oler enough resistance to lengthening and shortening so that they help to hold the thigh encircling band 25 in place lengthwise of the leg.

lf it' is desirable to provide greater freedom of movement of the ankle joint than Ais provided by the structure shown in Figs. l and 2 then the lower leg brace, see Fig. 5, may comprise an upper part 40 connected by a pivot pin 41 with a lower stirrup part 42. The stirrup part 42 is capable of being xedly attached to the sole yportion of a shoe 43. The pivot pin 41 is positioned substantially in transverse alignment with ythe ankle joint of the user. The torsion means is attached to the upper end portion of the upper leg brace part 40 in the same manner as it is to the leg `brace 30 of Figs. 1 and 2. In the construction shown in Fig. 5 downward pivotal movement offthe toe .portion of the shoe is limited by providing on thestirrup part 42 a ixed stop pin or lug 44 positioned to `be engaged bya shoulder 45 on the upper leg brace part 40.

It is possible to replace the upper spring member 18, shown lin Figs. l and 2, with a bar or rod 39,'as shown in Fig. 6 and still retain the benefits of the torsional action of the lower spring member 19. Fig. 6 shows a fragment of a -pelvic band 46 having a side plate 47 to which a waist-to-hip plate ,48 is rigidly secured. The plate y47 differs from the previously described plate 12 in that said plate 47 does not extend entirely around the back of the pelvic band 46 towhich it is attached. The upper end of the bar 39 is connected by a pivot member 49 with the lower end of the waist-to-hip plate 43. The lower end of the bar 39 is rigidly secured, as by screws 5i), tothe upper end portion of a short bearing rod 51. Thebearingrod` 51 is similar to the lpreviously described bearing rodZfl, 21 and has a torsion spring 52 vsimilar to the spring 19 secured thereto. The parts which rotatively support the bearing rod 51 and all parts below the spring 52 arevidentical'with those shown in Figs. land `2. The

structure shown in Fig. 6 is not as flexible as the structure shown in Figs. l and 2 but is operable to apply torsion to the lower legs and feet.

It is also possible to dispense with the waist-to-hip plate as shown in Figs. l, 2 and 6 and to use a torsion spring made from one integral piece of spring wire which extends substantially from a pelvic band or belt to a lower leg brace. Such a construction is illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8. Fig. 7 shows a waistencircling pelvic band 55; a torsion spring 56 having its upper end directly secured, by'a fitting 57, `to the pelvic band 55; a thigh encircling band 58 having a guide and bearing tube 59 of large enough diameter to receive the spring 56 and with the spring 56 rotatively supported in said tube 59 and a calf engaging semi-circular leg band 60 and lower leg brace 61 secured to the lower end of the spring 56. The lower end of the leg brace 61 may be connected with a shoe in the same manner as the leg brace 30 shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The calf engaging band 60 shown in Figs. 7 and 8 does not extend entirely around the leg but fits over the leg and encircles the leg suticiently so that when the lower leg brace is held by a shoe strap like the strap 38 shown in Fig. 2 the upper end portion of said lower leg brace will be held in place by said semi-circular band 60.

In operation, the brace means shown in Figs. 7 and 8 can be used to apply constant torsion to the lower leg and foot in substantially the same manner as the brace means shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

The foregoing description and accompanying drawings clearly disclose preferred embodiments of this invention but it will be understood that this disclosure is merely illustrative and that changes may be made within the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. In a torsion leg brace, a waist encircling pelvic band; a calf engaging leg band; a substantially rigid lower leg brace having its upper end connected with said calf engaging leg band; shoe engaging means providedat the lower end of said lower leg brace; torsion spring means; devices connecting the upper end of said torsion spring means with said pelvic band; and devices connecting the lower end of said torsion spring means with said lower leg brace, said torsion spring means when placed under stress torsionallly exerting torque on said lower leg brace while providing a high degree of ilexibility between the pelvic band and the lower leg brace.

2. In a torsion leg brace, a waist encircling pelvic band; a waist-to-hip plate attached to the side of said pelvic band andy extending `downwardly therefrom; a calf engaging leg band; -a lower leg brace having its upper end connected withsaid calf engaging leg band; shoe-engaging means provided at the lowerl end of said lower leg brace; and a torsion spring having its upper end attached to the lowerv end` of said waist-to-hip plate and its lower end attached to said leg brace, said spring when torsionally stressed providing constant torsion on said lower leg bracev and providing a high degree of flexibility between .the waist to hip plate and the lower leg brace.

3. In a torsion leg brace, a waist encircling pelvicband; a waist-to-hip plate attached to the side of said pelvic .band and vextending downwardly therefrom; va cali` engaging leg band; a lower leg brace having its upper end .attached tosaid calf engaging leg band andhaving shoe engaging means at its lower end; a torsion spring having its upper end attached to the'lower end of said waistto-hip plate and its lower end attached to said lower leg brace; and -a thigh encircling band rotatively supporting said torsion spring intermediate its length, said torsion yspring when torsionally stressed being capable of exerting constant torsion on said lower leg brace while-having a high degree of `flexibility in transverse directions.

4. ln-.a torsion leg brace, a waist encirclingpelvicrib and; a calf engaging leg band; a lower legbraceghavingwits upper end connected with said calf engaging leg band and having shoe engaging means at its lower end; torsion spring means; devices connecting the upper end of said torsion spring means with said pelvic band; other devices connecting the lower end of said torsion spring means with said lower leg brace, said spring means when torsionally stressed being capable of exerting a constant torsion 0n said lower leg brace; and a thigh encircling band rotatively supporting said torsion spring means intermediate its length.

5. In a torsion leg brace, a waist encircling pelvic band; a substantially rigid waist-to-hip plate attached to the side of said pelvic band and extending downwardly therefrom; a thigh encircling leg band; a calf engaging leg band; a substantially rigid lower `leg brace having its upper end connected with said calf engaging leg band and having shoe engaging means at its lower end; an upper helical torsion spring positioned between said waist-tohip plate and said thigh encircling leg band and having its upper end connected wth said waist-to-hip plate; a lower helical torsion spring positioned between said thigh encircling leg band and said calf engaging leg band and having its lower end connected with said lower leg brace; a short bearing rod attached to and connecting the adjacent ends of said two springs; and bearing means on said thigh encircling leg band rotatively receiving said bearing rod, said two torsion springs operating as a unit and when torsional-ly stressed exerting torsion on said lower leg brace.

6. ln a torsion leg brace, a waist encircling pelvic band; a substantially rigid waist-to-hip plate attached to the side of said pelvic band and extending downwardly therefrom; a substantially rigid lower leg brace having shoe attachment means at its lower end; a torsion spring having its upper end attached to the lower end of said waist-tohip plate and having its lower end attached to said lower leg brace; and a thigh encircling band rotatively supporting said torsion spring intermediate the length of said spring. said torsion spring when stressed by twisting of said lower leg brace relative to said waist-to-hip plate exerting a constant torsion on said lower leg brace while providing a high degree of flexibility between the waistto-hip plate and the llower leg brace.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2871852 *Jul 31, 1957Feb 3, 1959Miller Leland DOrthopedic device
US3750659 *May 1, 1972Aug 7, 1973Loomans DOrthopedic apparatus for legs to enable standing
US4296761 *Apr 25, 1980Oct 27, 1981Camp International, Inc.Convertible parapodium
US4408600 *Feb 1, 1982Oct 11, 1983Davis Edward PLeg aid device and method
US4602627 *Sep 6, 1984Jul 29, 1986Georgia Tech Research CorporationCable controlled orthopedic leg brace
US4865022 *Apr 19, 1989Sep 12, 1989Gorsen Robert MSelf applicable spring loaded pelvic traction device
US5058574 *Jun 22, 1990Oct 22, 1991Anderson Lucinda LTherapeutic limb brace
US6997891 *Sep 5, 2003Feb 14, 2006Brett VecseyLeg support system
DE1281106B *Mar 8, 1963Oct 24, 1968Candido ReyesVorrichtung zur Erleichterung des Gehens
EP0066028A1 *Jun 15, 1981Dec 8, 1982Guy SalortExternal upright position and walk apparatus for the lower-limbs motorically handicapped
EP0095396A1 *May 3, 1983Nov 30, 1983Guy SalortExternal upright position and walking apparatus for the lower-limbs motorically handicapped
EP0160780A1 *May 3, 1983Nov 13, 1985Guy SalortOrthopaedic shoe for the lower-limbs motorically handicapped
EP0625341A1 *Dec 18, 1992Nov 23, 1994Aktsionernoe Obschestvo Zakrytogo Tipa "Ajuverda"Device for treating patients with disturbances of pose and motor activity
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/23
International ClassificationA61F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/0102
European ClassificationA61F5/01D