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Publication numberUS2775171 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1956
Filing dateJun 11, 1951
Priority dateJun 11, 1951
Publication numberUS 2775171 A, US 2775171A, US-A-2775171, US2775171 A, US2775171A
InventorsHarford K Steen, Thelma V Thompson
Original AssigneeInterstate Bag Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and machine for bag making
US 2775171 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 25, 1956 H. K. sTL-:r-:N er.

METHOD AND MACHINE FOR BAG MAKING 5 Sheets-S1166?r l Filed June 11. 1951 Dec. 25, 1956 H. K. sTl-:r-:N ETAL METHOD AND MACHINE FOR BAG MAKING 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 11, 1951 Dec. 25, 1956 H. K. STEEN ETAL METHOD AND MACHINE FOR BAG MAKING 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June l1. 1951 Dec. 25, 1956 H. K. STEEN Erm.

METHOD AND MACHINE FOR BAG MAKING 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed June ll. 1951 Dec. 25, 1956 H. K. STEEN ErAL METHOD AND MACHINE Foa BAG MAKING .MSG MESQ, MMQSQ No Filed June 11. 1951 @NNN United States Patent O METHOD `AND MACHINE FOR BAG MAKING Harford K. Steen, Newburgh, N. Y., and Harold L. Thompson, deceased, late of Newburgh, N. Y., by Thelma V. Thompson, administratrx, Newburgh, N. Y., assignors to Interstate Bag Company, Walden, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application June 11, 1951, Serial No. 230,906 11 claims. (Cres-s) The present invention relates to a method and machine for bag making. While the invention is particularly applicable to making handled bags for carrying merchandise of various types, it is also of general application in the bag-making art. Starting with a continuous web of paper or other bag making material, it has been customary to form a tube and thereafter cut the same into bag lengths and bottoming the same. Sometimes the web is rst severed and the tube then formed from the severed length. Such methods, however, though quite standard in the art, have certain drawbacks. Foremost is the problem incident to the formation of the bottom of the bag. It will be noted that if the bag tube were to be transversely severed by a simple out making both bag sides the same length, difficulty would be had when one end of the tube was turned over to form the bottom since the outer layer would not be in contact with the reverse side of the bag against which it is to be pasted. Therefore it is the practice so to cut the bag tube as to make one side longer than the other. While this enables the bottom to be formed satisfactorily, the increased length of one side of the bag is had at the expense of the corresponding side of the bag `next following whereby one top edge is below the other.

However, the capacity of such a bag is determined by the shortest length of the shorter side. Even though advantage is taken of this fact to facilitate the opening of the bag, yet the bag opening can be facilitated in other ways (as by making use of the handle) whereby the increased length of one side represents in the aggregate a tremendous loss of paper or other material constituting the bag. In some instances, when the bag has thus been formed, the excess material at the top of the bag is cut off in order to present even,.square edges for the two bag sides.

It is thus a principal object of the invention to provide a continuous method and machine for bag making in which two sides of the bag are formed from separate webs which are severed to form preferably straight top and bottom edges but of different lengths so that the longer length may contribute in part at least the necessary bottoming material.

It is a further object to provide a continuous method and machine for bag making to produce a bag with handles which may be secured to the bag at the inside surfaces thereof. When handles are applied to a bag that has already been tubed, there is no easy Way to secure the ends of the handle to the inside surfaces of the bag, hence they are commonly placed on the outside. This, however, is a drawback for the reason that handles secured Vto the outside of the bag, especially by being pasted thereto, are much more easily peeled olf as when the loaded bag, for example, is grasped by the handle at one side thereof.

When, however, the handles are pasted on the inside surfice A still further object -is to form a gusset in one of the webs during its feed into the machine, thereby produc= ing a gusseted bag.

A still further object is to provide improved bottoming mechanism as a part of a unitary bag making machine.

A further advantage of the improved method and machine is that the iirst bag side, for example, may be made of a different material from the second bag side. For example, it may be made of a transparent material such as cellophane or it may be made of a higher grade of paper which will enable a better printing job to be done upon it than would be the case with the second bag side.

Still further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which Fig. l is a View in longitudinal vertical section, partly diagrammatic, of the improved machine for carrying out the operations of bag making in accordance with the improved method, save only for the operations of forming bag handles and for forming the gussets in one of the webs shown in Figs. l-A and l-B respectively;

F ig. l-A shows in perspective the part of the machine to the left of Fig. 1 adapted to form the bag handles;

Fig. l-B shows in perspective that part of the machine to the left of Fig. l adapted to feed a web of bag making material and to form gussets therein;

Fig. 2 is a section taken on line 22 of Fig. l-B;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of the main drum of the machine upon which various operations of the bag making are carried out, such view showing diagrammatically the various cam mechanisms employed. The view also illustrates the further travel of the work in the machine from the position of the work in Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic View in elevation of the machine for illustrating the driving connections of the various parts whereby accurate timing of the various operations is had;

Fig. 5 illustrates the method which is` carried out of forming a handled bag without reference to any specic mechanism.

The invention is exemplified in the manufacture of a handled bag shown in the lower right hand corner of Fig. 5 of the gusseted type, having what is termed a square bottom. Herein the essential steps of the method are illustrated of advancing a first Sheet lil which has been severed from a web 11, stamped with a band of adhesive 12 in the form of a U around the periphery of the sheet except for the top edge thereof, and also a glue spot 13 for the securement of the handle 14. Si multaneously a second continuous sheet 1S is advanced, from a supply not shown in Fig. 5, said sheet being; formed (it a gusseted bag is being manufactured) with, gussets 16 and a glue spot 17. Next, the handle la has the adjacent end thereof secured to the rst sheet or bag side 10 by bringing such end tightly against the glue spot 13, then the composite so formed is superimposed on gusseted sheet 15 which is shorter than the sheet 1t, thereby permitting the bottom end 18 to be folded over and caused to adhere to the outer surface 0f the second sheet 15, thereby forming the bottom of the bag. In the act of superimposing the two bag sides, the unattached handle end is secured to the .second sheet 15 as will be apparent from an inspection of this figure (Fig. 5). As part of the handle forming method, a transverse crea-se or fold line 19 is formed in each leg of handle 14 at an angle preferably 45 degrees to the handle axis in order that the handle may, when the bag is opened, be folded so as to line the inside half periphery and maintain it in open position as.- disclosed.

in pending application of `Steen-and` Thompson, tiled JulyA 8 1950, Serial No. 172,736, `now Patent 2,652,187, of which this application is a continuation in part.

Reference to Figs. l, l-A and l-B will indicate how the ,steps illustrated in Fig. are carried out on the improved machine; First', however, it will be convenient to describe the mechanism of Figs. lA and l-B for forming the handle material and the` gusseted web respectively. In Fig. 1A, bag handle material 25 from a bulk supply roll 26 is fed through tensioning rolls 26, 27, 28 to a folding device (station A) consisting of a former 3@ which, with the assistance of ting-gers 32 which initiate the side folds, folds the bag handle material or tape over upon itself to increase the strength thereof, being aided by the draw rolls 33, 34 to the right of former and guided by roll 35 to the left thereof.

The manner of forming the paper strip to forni the handle material is subject to considerable variation to make a reinforced handle material. In the embodiment shown the material is folded to form a strip having a cross section shaped substantially as a flattened C (shown best in Fig. 5). Various other means of forming the handle are described in the copending application of Steen, Serial No. 234,320, filed June 29, 1951. The handle material having been formed, it is severed into strips of the desired length by means of cutoff roller having knife 41 and cooperating with backing roller 42. Rollers33 and 34 feed the strip between the rollers 40, 42 (which are positioned to permit this), after which the strip is cut off by the action of the blade 41 carried by the roll 49. The severed strip is then seized by the pinch rolls 43, 24 (the latter having the relieved portion 46) and fed to the drums 85, 86 for further operations to be described. The rate of feed of the `strip between rolls 40, 42 prior to severance by blade 41 is dependent upon the length of handle desired and is governed by the number of revolutions of feed rolls 33 and 34 per cycle.

In Fig. lB the second sheet 15 is fed from a bulk supply, not shown, through a gusset former (station B) consisting of brackets 50 only one of which is shown) upon which is secured a cross bar 52 carrying supporting members 53 for former plates 54, 5S, which are also seen in cross section Fig. 2. As will be evident from Fig. 1-B, the plates 56, 57 which are attachedto blocks 5S, 59 respectively cooperate with the plates 54 and 55 to form a progressively narrowing throat by means of which the sheet 15 has gradually formed therein the gussets 16. Also, at the time when the fol. ing of the sheet commences, folders are provided which operate to turn the edge of the sheet to make a further 180 degree fold to create parallel strips 63 serving to unite the gusseted sheet 15 to the sheet 10 by means of the glue deposit 12. Spring pressed rollers 64, 65 assist in creasing this fold last mentioned. A gusset having been formed in either edge of the web 15, a glue spot 17 is printed thereupon by means of the glue applicator rolls generally indicated at 66 and driven from the mainv drive shaft 10ft-S by a sprocket chain 15h-A, and given a final creasing by means of the rollers 67, 67' which also serve as draw rolls for feeding the web, together with draw rollsS, 6B of Fig. l.

Reference may now be had to Fig. 1 which shows the feed of the top sheet web 10 through a printer 69 (if this is to be used for printing either words or decoration as may be desired), thence between feed rolls 70, 71 to the cutting roll pair 72, 73 which sever the web into sheets constituting the first or top bag sides which are now fed by feed rolls 74, 75 (one of which 74 is a segmental roll to enable the severed sheet to be speeded up) to glue applicator roll 76 which prints a glue contiguration designated 12 and simultaneously prints the glue spot 13 of Fig. 5, the sheet being held against the roll 76 by the main drum 77.

The rst sheet which has' now been severed from the web contains whatever printed matter' it is' desired to have on it and has had the glue configuration also printed upon it, whereupon it is secured to the drum 77 by the combined action of clamps 78 and pins 79 (each preferably two in number of which only one each is seen in Fig. l). The pins, after the clamping action to be described has taken place, are caused to pierce the sheet, being actuated by cam track 80, pivoted cam follower 81, pivotally attached to pin 79, the cam follower 81 being caused to follow the track $0 by means of spring d2. In this arrangement each of the pins 79 is thus positively actuated to pierce the sheet and is retracted by means of the spring 82. Clamps '78 may each be in the form `of a bell crank pivoted at 83 and terminating in cam follower roller 83', the latter is caused to follow cam track 84 by means of spring 84. The sheet 10 is thus held securely on the drum and in such position is brought to the point where it is ready to receive the handle 14 which has been cut and conveyed by means of mechanism now to be described. v

By means of the segmental roll 44 and the cooperating roll 43, Fig; l, the cut handle strip has been fed l'between a second drum S5 and a third drum 86 provided with suitable handle folding elements. Thus shortly after the handle strip is received between the drums 85 and 86, it is gripped by means of a pin 87 on drum 86, pin 87 serving to cause the handle end to follow the drum 86. After this occurs a tucker -blade S9 on drum 86 creates an inciplient fold in the handle strip by pushing it into recess 90 of the lower drum 85. When this occurs a pincer blade 81 operates to grip the fold within the recess 90 due to the action of cam 92 acting upon pivoted cam follower 93 attached to blade 91 and spring 95. Thereby the folded handle is securely held by the drum 85, continued rotation of the drum 85 serving to pull the handle end form the drum S6 to which it was momentarily attached by pin 87 which, as shown in Fig. l is spring-actuated to Withdraw it before the handle is gripped in the drum S5 (cam 96 and spring pressed follower 97). Continued rotation of drum 85 brings the now folded handle against the surface of the main drum 77 ahead of the formed end of sheet ltlupon which drum 77 the handle is fixed by engagement with the xed pin 100, such pin passing through both legs or the handle. When this occurs the pincet blade 91 will be caused to release the fold of the handle by the action of the cam 92 and the pressure between drums 77 and 85 will further cause the adjacent handle end to be stuck to the sheet 10 by contact with the glue spot 13. During the formation of the handle the score lines 19 are formed by means of a crease bar 101 in the roll 86 in cooperation with a resilient inset 102 in roll 85. Inl Fig. 5 a crease 19 in the right hand leg of the handle has already been formed but the formation of the score line of the other leg of the handle has not yet taken place.

The assembly consisting of the sheet 10 and handle 14 (with the handle secured against movement by engagement with pin 100) is now ready for engagement with the gusseted sheet 1S which has been prepared as above pointed out in connection with Fig. 14B. Said sheet 1'5 now having been `severed by means of the cutting roll 103 acting against backing roll 104, the same is fed by means of feed rolls 105, (105 being segmental for speeding up the travel of the cut sheet) to the bight between drum 77 and` bottom former roll 107. Thereby the said sheets IG-and 15 are superimposed and the unattached handle leg is brought into contact with the glue spot 17 on sheet 15 and the bag tube thus formed. In order, however, for superimposition to occur, the clamps 78 are momentarily retracted by action of cam 84, the bag side 10 being kept from getting out of position by means of the pins 79. After superimposition has been had, said cam? 84 operates to again-bring the clamps 78`int'o position' to` engage thev now completed bag tube. This back and forth movementof the clamps 78 is had by the cam lobe 108 of cam 84. (See Figs. 1

and 3.) p

The further travel of the bag tube between drums 77 and roll 107 brings into operation the bottom forming mechanism comprised of pincer blade 110 operating in a recess 111 and actuated by pivoted cam follower 112 and cam 113. The elements are actuated to grip the fold in the bottom of the bag made by the tucker blade 11,4 `(Fig. l) in the roll 107. 'I'he bottom of the bag havingbeen thus gripped, the end of the sheet (10a) is now folded against the outside of sheet by means of pivoted fingers 120 having cam follower rollers 121 in contact with cam surface 122. t

Immediately prior to the action just described, a crease is formed across the bag parallel to and spaced from thebottom of the unopened bag a distance one-half the width of the expanded gusset of sheet 15 whereby to facilitate the transverse folding of the expanded gussets against the bottom of the bag when the same is opened, such crease being formed by a creasing blade 123 in roll 107 which registers with a recess 124 in the drum 77.

After this creasing action takes place, the pincer blade 110 is released enabling the bottom `of the bag to be released from therecess 111. Also it will be evident that the recess 125 of the roll 107 will enable the fingers 120 to extend beyond the periphery of the drum 77. Such recess also enables the point at which the bottom folding takes place to be varied somewhat depending on the size of the bag, for example. Further travel of the drum '77 subjects the completed bag to further pressing between drum 77 and drum 130. Means are provided at this point for stripping the completed bags from the drum- 77 in the form of a wedge or stripper 131 fitting into the bight between the drums 130 `and 77 and projecting into aigroove in the latter together with endless tapes 132 which pass around grooved guide rolls 133, 134 and are caused to come between the bags and the grooved drum 130. Outer tapes 135 are likewise provided which pass around pulleys 136 and 137,` a train of overlapping bags thus being conveyed from the drum 130 between the two tapes 132 and 135. Reverting to drum 77, by the time the leading edge of the bag has reached the stripper 131, the pins 79 and theclamps 78 are retracted by the action of their respective springs so as to enable the stripping ofthe bags to take place.

Reference to Fig. 1 will reveal the fact that in the embodiment shown, the main drum 77 is adapted to process three bags at the same time whereas the roll 86 and the drum 85 are of such size and the arrangement is such that they are handling two handles per revolution of the drum S5. So long as the parts move in the i proper timed relation, this arrangement may be varied by suitable gear change mechanisms (not shown) for varying the feed of the top sheet 10 and consequently its length. This change necessitates gear changes for the gussetsheet 15 and may or may not require suitable gear changes for the handle feeding mechanism depending on whether or not the handle length is to be changed. `Other adjustments may be made as the need dictates as will occur to those skilled in the art.

It will be noted that the first sheet and the handle both are` pinned to or impaled upon said `drum whereby when they meet the second sheet they are held securely against displacement in any direction. Also when the second sheet is superimposed upon the first, it too is pinned to the drum whereby the three parts are efectively prevented from beingdisplaced in the operation of bottoming the bag. It will further be noted that the clamps 78 act as stops for the advancing first and secand sheets.

` It is apparent that the various parts of the machine mustoperate strictly in timed relation to one another. Toaccomplish `this theparts are driven by gearing and chain drives as follows:

The main drive shaft 104-S upon which is secured the backing roll 104 for the cutoff of the gusseted sheet 15 is geared to` drive shaft 10S-S upon which is mounted gear 156. In order to drive the feed rolls 67, 67', 68, 68', the following is provided, viz: Idler gear 154 which meshes with gear 156 and gears 68'G, 68G, thus driving rolls 68', 68; train comprising gears 68G, idler 158, which meshes with gear 67'G and that finally with gear 67G for driving rolls 67', 67. From drive shaft 104-S sprocket chain 150-A drives the handle glue spot applicator roll (shown in the group 66).

In order to drive main drum 77 counter-clockwise the main shaft 104`S is geared to idler 159 which in turn engages ring gear 77G. Idler 159 is also geared to drive a roller 106 whose gear in turn meshes with gear 105G. Gear 76G meshes `with gear 77G to drive the glue applicator 76. This in turn receives its glue from dauber rolls 163, 164, one of which is immersed in the glue pot 165 (as shown in Fig. 4 dauber roll 163 is driven by intermeshing gears 76G and 163G and 164 is not gear driven).

Gear 77G of drum 77 drives bottom former roll 107 by engagement with gear 107G. In order to feed the handle material through the machine, a series of gears are driven by gear 77G which engages gear 85G of drum 85. This in turn meshes with 86G secured on the shaft of the handle folding roll 86. Herein the gear ratio is such that for each rotation of the drum two handles are delivered to drum 77 while the tucker blade roll 86 tucks in one bag handle per revolution. For driving the handle feeding and severing rolls, gear SSG meshes with idler 166 which meshes with gear 44G of roll 44. In turn gear 44G coacts with gear 43G. Gear 44G through idler 167 drives gear 42G, the latter meshing in turn with 40G of cutting roll 40. Intermeshing gears 33G, 34G are driven by the intermeshing of gear 40G with idlers 168 engaging a gear mounted on the same shaft as above mentioned gear 34G (the fact that the handle material must be initially fed at a speed twice that of the completed handle has already been referred to).

The top sheet feeding mechanism is likewise driven by gear 77G which engages idler 169 driving gear 75G. Idler 75G in turn engages 74G. Gear 169 also engages 73G and in turn drives 72G of cutting roll 72. Feed rolls 70, 71 are driven from 72G through gear train 172, 175, 176 and 70G as will be evident from Fig. 4. On the shaft carrying gear 176 is mounted gear 177 for printer 69 which receives its ink from inkpot 180 by means of ink applicators 181, 182.

The drive for the conveyor mechanism for delivering completed bags from the machine comprises gear G which engages the main drum gear 77G in a clockwise direction, the drum of which is provided with groove 183 to receive conveyor belts which cooperate with the above mentioned conveyor belts which are driven from the machine by mechanism not shown.

It will be seen that the many advantages stated for our improved method and machine have been realized in the preferred embodiment above described. Among the more important of these is the saving of paper or other bag making materials with the production of a bag of enhanced neatness due to its even top edges.

While We have devised a machine of which the bottoming mechanism is an integral part, we wish it to be understood that if desired the bottoming operation may be performed in other ways or in a separate device. We wish it further understood that various changes may be made in our method and machine without departing from the spirit of our invention or the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. Method of forming a bag having a handle, the ends of which are attached to the opposite inside faces of the bag whichcomprises the steps of endwise advancing a sheet of paper or the like constituting a first bag side,

advancing; an end-to-end folded handle with the folded end foremost at a rate synchronized with the rate ofl sheet advance, unitingo'ne end of said handle-to said advancing sheet', endwise advancing a second sheet of paper or the like constituting a second bag side complementary to said first bag side at a rate synchronized with the advance of said sheet first mentioned, uniting they structure thus formed including the un-united handle end with said second bag side to form a handled bag tube;

2. Method of forming a bag. having a handle, the ends of which are attached to the opposite inside faces of the bag which comprises the steps of endwise advancing a sheet of paper or` the like constituting a rst bag side, applying adhesive thereto for securement of the compleentary side and one end of said handle, advancing an end-to-end folded handle Withthe folded end foremost at a rate synchronized with the rate of sheet advance, uniting one end of said handle to said advancing sheet, endwise advancing a second sheet of paper or the like containing a spot adhesive for securement of the second handle end constituting a second bag side complementary to said first bag side at a rate synchronized with the advance of said sheet first mentioned, uniting the structure thus formed including the un-united handle end with said second bag side to form a handled bag tube.

3. The method of forming a bag having a handle the ends of which are attached to the opposite inside faces of the bag which comprises advancing a first sheet to constitute a first bag side upon a rotating first surface while gripping the leading edge of same, advancing a strip of handle material upon a second rotating surface at a rate synchronized with that of said first sheet, folding said strip back on itself while gripping same at the fold thereof, bringing said handle and said first sheet together by the continued rotation of said surfaces while releasing said handle from said second surface and securing one end thereof to said sheet, advancing at a rate synchronized with said first sheet a second sheet to constitute a bag side complementary to said first bag side and engaging saine between said iirst surface and a third rotating surface, the pressure of said rst and third rotating surfaces serving to unite in the presence of adhesive on the surfaces to be united said second sheet to the bag structure already formed including the un-united handle end thereby to form a handled bag tube, and bottoming the end of said tube while the same is engaged between said lirst and third rotating surfaces.

4. A bag making machine comprising in combination means for advancing in an endwise direction a continuous sheet of paper or the like, means for severing same into a first bag side piece, means for advancing a continuous strip of handle material and means for cutting and folding the cut strips, means for attaching one end of each folded strip to an end portion of said first bag side piece, means for advancing simultaneously with said first sheet a second sheet, means for severing same into a second bag side piece, means for attaching said second bag side piece to such first bag side piece and to the unattached end of said handle, and means for bottoming the bag `structure thus formed.

5. A bag making machine comprising in combination a revoluble drum, means for feeding thereto a first bag side sheet, means on said drum for gripping a leading edge of said sheet, means for feeding to said drum a second bag side sheet in timed relation thereto so as to superimpose said second sheet upon said first sheet, means for completely severing said first and second bag side sheets from a bulk web supply of sheet material, said severing means being located with respect to said drum so as to effect the severing action prior to the application of said sheets to said drum by said feed means, impaling means adapted to engage said first bag side sheet to retain it in position upon said drum upon release of said leading edge gripping means, means for releasing said gripping means so as to engage said second sheet while saidzrst sheet isretained. on said drum by said impaling means, means for securing into permanent association two opposed edges of one sheet with corresponding. two opposed edges ofthe other sheet, means for bottoming` one end of said two side sheets thus associated, and means for advancing and retracting said impaling means in timed relation to the bag making operations. Y

6. A bag making machine according to claim 5 in which said bottoining means is included at least in part on said drum.

7. A bag making machine comprising in combination a drum, means for advancing to said drum a first sheet to constitute a first bag side, means on saidv drum for securing thereto a leading edge of said sheet, means for feeding a handle to said drum and securing one end of same to said first sheet, means for feeding a second sheet to said drum in superimposition upon the coinposite formed of saidk first sheet and said handle, means for releasing said leading edge at such time of superimposition of said second sheet while retaining the composite in place upon said drum.

8. Method of forming a bag having a handle, the ends of which are attached to the opposite inside faces of the bag which comprises the steps of endwise advancing a sheet of paper or the like constituting a first bag side, advancing an end-to-end folded handle of substantially flat ribbon-like material with the folded end foremost at a rate synchronized with the rate of sheet advance, uniting one end of said handle flatwise to said advancing sheet, with said folded end projecting beyond the advancing edge of said sheet while fixing in space said `projecting portion until such time as the structure so formed is united to a second sheet constituting the second bag side, endwise advancing a second sheet of paper or the like constituting a second bag side com plementary to said first bag side at a rate synchronized with the advance of said sheet first mentioned, uniting the structure thus formed including the un-united handle end with said second bag side to form a handled bag tube so as to have the handle constitute substantially an extension of the plane of the collapsed bag.

9. A bag making machine comprising in combination means for advancing in an endwise direction a first sheet of 'bag making material to constitute afirst bag side, means for imprinting thereon adhesive stripes along at least the longitudinal margins thereof, a drum, means thereon for securing the leading edge of said sheet, means for feeding a handle to said drum and for securing one end of said handle to said first sheet, means for feeding a second sheet to said drum in superiinposition upon the composite formed of said first sheet and said handle and for pressing said sheets together to unite same, means for releasing said leading edge of said first sheet at such time of superimposition while retaining the composite in place upon said drum.

l0. A bag making machine comprising in combination means for advancing in an endwise direction a first sheet of bag making material to constitute a first bag side, means for imprinting thereon adhesive stripes along all margins thereof save that of the Vleading edge, together with a spot for securement of a handle end, a drum, means thereon for securing the leading edge of said sheet, means for feeding a handle to said drum and for pressing one end of said handle against said adhesive spot, means for feeding a second sheet to said drum in superimposition upon the composite formed of said first sheet and said handle and for pressing said sheets together to unite same and to secure the other handle end to said second sheet, means for releasing said leading edge of said first sheet at such timer of superimposition while retaining the composite in place upon said drum.

l1. A bagv making machineI comprising in combination a drum, means for advancing to said drum a first sheet to constitute a rst bag side, means on said drum for securing thereto a leading edge of said sheet, means for feeding a handle to said drum and securing one end of same to said rst sheet, means for fixing to said drum that portion of the handle projecting beyond the advancing edge of said rst sheet, means for feeding a second sheet to said drum in superimposition upon the composite formed of said rst sheet and said handle, means for releasing said leading edge at such time of superimposition of said second sheet while retaining the composite in place upon said drum, and means for releasing the completed bag structure from the drum.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 175,314 Wheelock Mar. 28, 1876 10 y Read July 25, Barber Dec. 23, Steen Nov. 10, Steen Nov. 10, Potdevin July 20, Parrish July 8, Faeher Feb. 10, Crafts May 29, Crary July 15, Grant Apr. 21,

FOREIGN PATENTS Germany May 17,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3147673 *Apr 16, 1962Sep 8, 1964Package Containers IncApparatus for attaching handles to paper bags
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US4716707 *Jul 1, 1986Jan 5, 1988"Baumer Di Mario Gambetti"Apparatus for shrink-wrapping articles with handles
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DE1611713B1 *Mar 4, 1968Jun 24, 1971Windmoeller & HoelscherVorrichtung zum Aufbringen von Streifenabschnitten,z.B.von Bodendeckblaettern auf quergefoerderte Sackwerkstuecke in einer Sackmaschine
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/226, 493/224, 383/6, 493/243, 493/221
International ClassificationB31B19/86
Cooperative ClassificationB31B2219/9077, B31B19/86
European ClassificationB31B19/86