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Publication numberUS2775970 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1957
Filing dateJun 8, 1954
Priority dateJun 8, 1954
Also published asDE1001107B
Publication numberUS 2775970 A, US 2775970A, US-A-2775970, US2775970 A, US2775970A
InventorsSchoenbaum Alexander W
Original AssigneeAmerican Tobacco Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette paper
US 2775970 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unitcd States Patent CIGARETTE PAPER Alexander W. Schoenbaum, Richmond, Va., assignor to The American Tobacco Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey No Drawing. Application June 8, 1954, Serial No. 435,359

4 Claims. (Cl. 131-15) This invention relates to the manufacture of paper and more particularly to the production of a paper that is particularly adapted for use as a cigarette wrapper.

With some of the papers now employed in the manufacture of cigarettes, small particles of partially burned paper, commonly called fly ash, will fall from a burning cigarette at frequent intervals. Sometimes theseparticles are not fully consumed, but are still burning when they land on carpets, upholstered furniture, the smokers clothing, or the like. They are, thus, a fire hazard and also a nuisance.

It has been suggested that paper intended for use in the manufacture of cigarettes be treated or impregnated with various materials to produce a paper which, when used as a cigarette wrapper, will burn with formation of a non-flaking ash. Some impregnants that have been suggested for this purpose have also been alleged to decrease the quantity of irritating gases in the cigarette smoke. However, investigation has established that many of the materials suggested, neither improve the burning characteristics of the paper nor produce a smoother smoke. Many of them actually produce obnoxious fumes not present in cigarette smoke from cigarettes made with other papers.

I have found that a paper particularly suitable as a cigarette paper may be produced by treating the paper with sodium chloride, preferably in combination with a fire retarding compound, such as carboxymethyl cellulose. It has heretofore been proposed to treat cigarette paper with various materials including inorganic salts to decrease the inflammability of the paper. But when the sodium chloride is added to paper in an amount equal to 0.5 to 2% of the weight of the paper, it increases the burning rate of the paper. This increase, while not sufiicient to preclude the use of sodium chloride, might be objectionable and I, therefore, propose to add another material to the paper which will ofiset the acceleration of burning rate proposed by the salt addition without affecting the beneficial efiects of its additions. Various compounds may be used for this purpose. Thus, I propose to add about 0.2% of carboxymethylcellulose with the sodium chloride.

The carboxymethylcellulose may be added in amounts from 0.1% to 1.0% by weight. Other materials which will offset the acceleration of burning rate when sodium chloride is added to the paper in the proportions stated are gum arabic, hydroxyethyl cellulose, locust bean, tragacanth, sodium alginate, Methocel X-2602 (a water soluble hydroxpropyl methylcellulose ether) and carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose. These may be used in the proportions stated above, that is, 0.1% to 1.0%.

The addition materials may be added to the paper in any suitable manner. Thus, they may be placed on the paper after its manufacture by forming a solution of sodium chloride and the retardent and applying such solution to the paper in any suitable manner. This may be done, for instance, by passing the paper through a bath containing the addition agents. Or the impreg- 'ice nants may be added to the pulp prior to formation of the paper, and the pulp then formed into sheets in the usual way.

In a specific example paper for use in cigarette manufacture was impregnated with substantially 1% of sodium chloride and substantially 0.2% of carboxymethylcellulose by means of rolls arranged approximately midway of the drying section of a paper-making machine. The solution is applied to one of the rolls by passing the roll through a tank in which it is placed, and the paper is then fed between the moistened roll and a second roll. In any of the methods of application the concentration of sodium chloride and the retardent may be controlled by varying the strength of the solution. Where the paper is passed between a pair of rolls, one of the rolls is felt-covered. In this instance the concentration of the addition materials can be further controlled by adjustment of the roll-pressure.

Paper treated as heretofore described forms a white ash as it burns, and this ash shrinks around the tobacco ash forming a solid band. It produces a more pleasing appearance than that produced by the dark gray ash which is formed when the cigarettes are made of untreated paper. The shrinkage of the paper ash strength ens the whole ash on the end of the cigarette and almost completely prevents the dropping of fly ash.

In many instances the slight increase in the burning rate of the paper caused by the addition of sodium chloride is not noticeable. In those instances that it is noticeable, the addition of the retardant shows up the burning rate to substantially that of untreated paper. The proportions of sodium chloride and carboxymethylcellulose given in the specific example have been found to be satisfactory for a certain paper. If other papers are used, the amount of carboxymethylcellulose or other retardant may be adjusted to obtain the desired burning rate.

In the final product, i. e., the cigarette, the better burning qualities are the only noticeable difference between cigarettes made with the paper of the present invention and cigarettes made with other papers. In some instances the sodium chloride additions in amounts of from 0.5% to 2% by weight do not increase the burning rate a suflicient amount to require the retardent. But when it does, one of the retardents may be used in the amount necessary to reduce the burning rate to that of untreated paper. In some instances cigarettes made with sodium chloride impregnated paper produced a milder and more pleasant smoke than that of similar cigarettes made with untreated paper.

I claim:

1. A cigarette paper containing not less than 0.5% and not more than 2% by weight of sodium chloride, and not less than 0.1% and not more than 1.0% of a fire retardent selected from the group consisting of carboxymethylcellulose, gum arabic, hydroxyethyl cellulose, locust bean gum, gum tragacanth, sodium algmate, Methocel X-2602 (a water soluble hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ether) and carboxyrnethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose.

2. A cigarette paper containing not less than 0.5% and not more than 2% by weight of sodium chloride and not less than 0.1% and not more than 1% carboxymethylcellulose.

3. A cigarette paper containing substantially 1% by weight of sodium chloride and 0.2% carboxymethylcellulose.

4. In the production of a cigarette paper which, on burning, produces a white clinging ash, the step which comprises adding not less than 0.5 and not more than 2% by weight of sodium chloride and not less than 0.1% and not more than 1% by Weight of a fire retardent select- 3 ed from the group consisting of carboxy mcthylcellulose, gum arabic, hydroxyethyl cellulose, locust bean gum, gum tragacanth, sodium alginate, Methocel X-2602 (a water soluble hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ether) and carboxymethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose to the paper.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 4 Finley Sept. 6, 1927 Morton Sept. 21, 1943 Sartoretto et a1. Oct. 14, 1952 Samfield et a1 May 10, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain June 26, 1930 OTHER REFERENCES Scientific American, July 21, 1894, page 38, Fireproofing Compounds.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US671548 *Dec 22, 1900Apr 9, 1901Isaac GordonComposition for fireproofing paper.
US1605085 *Mar 26, 1926Nov 2, 1926Louis UngerCigarette paper
US1641478 *Sep 6, 1922Sep 6, 1927Paraffine Co IncProcess of treating paper
US2329927 *Apr 28, 1938Sep 21, 1943Morton Joseph BMethod of and composition for treating cigarettes, cigarette paper, and tobacco
US2613672 *Jul 11, 1946Oct 14, 1952Int Cigar Mach CoTobacco sheet material and method of producing the same
US2708175 *May 28, 1954May 10, 1955Brock Brantley AComposition of matter consisting chiefly of fragmented tobacco and galactomannan plant gum
GB331079A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3013936 *Jan 7, 1958Dec 19, 1961Du PontSynthetic fiber papers
US5849153 *Jul 30, 1996Dec 15, 1998Mishima Paper Co., Ltd.Water-dispersible sheet and cigarette using the same
US5878753 *Mar 11, 1997Mar 9, 1999Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.Smoking article wrapper for controlling ignition proclivity of a smoking article without affecting smoking characteristics
US5878754 *Mar 10, 1997Mar 9, 1999Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.Smoking article wrapper for controlling ignition proclivity of a smoking article
US6645605Jan 15, 2001Nov 11, 2003James Rodney HammersmithMaterials and method of making same for low ignition propensity products
US8863757Jul 14, 2004Oct 21, 2014Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.Smoking articles with reduced ignition proclivity characteristics
US9181659Oct 12, 2012Nov 10, 2015Cp Kelco OyCompositions having increased concentrations of carboxymethylcellulose
US20040123874 *Sep 22, 2003Jul 1, 2004Zawadzki Michael A.Reduced ignition propensity smoking article with a polysaccharide treated wrapper
US20040255966 *Jul 14, 2004Dec 23, 2004Kraker Thomas A.Smoking articles with reduced ignition proclivity characteristics
US20090159090 *Dec 19, 2008Jun 25, 2009Reemtsma Cigarettenfabriken GmbhSmoking article with improved extinguishing characteristcs
EP0133575A1 *Aug 8, 1984Feb 27, 1985Kimberly-Clark CorporationReduced ignition proclivity smoking article wrapper and smoking article
EP0193607A1 *Sep 3, 1984Sep 10, 1986Japan Tobacco Inc.Cigarette
EP2071965A1 *Dec 20, 2007Jun 24, 2009Reemtsma Cigarettenfabriken GmbHSmoking article with improved extinguishing characteristics
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/139, 162/178, 162/177
International ClassificationA24B15/16, A24B15/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21H5/16
European ClassificationD21H5/16