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Publication numberUS2776113 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1957
Filing dateNov 22, 1954
Priority dateNov 22, 1954
Publication numberUS 2776113 A, US 2776113A, US-A-2776113, US2776113 A, US2776113A
InventorsCarter K Reh
Original AssigneeBorg Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Housing for earth boring apparatus
US 2776113 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 1, 1957 c. KQREH 1 2,776,113

. HOUSING FOR EARTH BORING APPARATUS Filed Nov. 22, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jan. 1, 1957 c. K. REH

HOUSING FOR EARTH BORING APPARATUS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed NOV. 22, 1954 m //////M a a 5 n J\# w m m a 6 2 n 7 /K7 T. p f V ,.....m".,m M w M. m: w 4 m 0 M v@ h @g@w. r HUN 7 "Jill M m w m u c. K. REH

Jan. 1,;1957

Q I 'I-IOUSINGFOR EARTH BORING APPARATUS 4' Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 22 1954* 73441 CPQAAW United States Patent HOUSING FOR EARTH :BQRING APPARATU Carter K. Reh, Van-Nuys, =Calif.,- assignor to Borg-Warner Corporation, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois pp tio N v..en1be .22,y195! S ial lie-470, 1

.6:Claims. :(Cl.-.255-4J8) The presentinvention relatesgin general to earth boring apparatus nd is p ti ularlyc n ern d th ibr generating devices of the .general typemused to actuate a vibrato y e th o ns r ro otlthe type disclosed the patent to A. .G. Bodine 2,554,095.

The principal object of the present invention is to .provide an improved housingstructure for enclosing a vibration generator of the type mused for actuating a vibratory earth. boring .drill, rod.

A more specific object of the present invention is .to provide a housing structure ,of the.foregoing general type comprising a plurality or" complementary housing -members adapted to befittedtogether after the generator assembly is firstzmounted withinhonetofrthe members.

.More specifically, it is object of.,tl1e ,present .in-

.vention to .provide improved ;means for sealinga pair of. complementary housing sections ;so .as to prevent ,the admission of foreign-particles thereinto.

'In connectionwith the foregoing objectpf the present invention, each of the housing, ,se ctions is provided with a mating surface in which are .providedsopposed ,openings ,adaptedto receivemounting-shafts for facilitating .the mounting'ofapparatus vwithinthe housing. vSuitable resilient substantially incompressible plugsare disposed in the ends of the openings rforsealing vthe openings against mud fluid custtrmarflYutilized in piltwellidrilling a d passes t ou .incqmpr ssiblemlugsin such a n that it i omp es ed a agains tthe te her :rnenib r when h chan smisi einass mble The foregoing hand :nurnerous other objects and .adv a f th p es n nv ntionewillrbeeomeannarent .af h fo ow ng 1 a l rd sclriptionthereofwhenread in coniun i ntwithth ;;aecompany ng-:drawings wherein: 1 is eiil zu trationrofeconventional:oil

well drilling apparatus ;lltilized for-suspending,drilhpipe string in amearthrbore; Fig. 2. is 1a schematicdllustration of anlearthiboring drill rod of the type .zdisclosedsin :thetaforementioned Bodine Patento. '2;554,0.05 andiwithtwhich thexpresent inventionris particularly applicable;

Fig.8 is a .schematic.=elevationalview of avibration generator enclosed 'in a :housing constructed in accordance.with the principles of .the presentiinvention;

Figs. 4A, .4B. anda4C eomprise-elevational views, shown partly in-.:section,:illustra t-ing theifeaturestofthe present invention;

Fig. -15 is a sectional tview taken substantially ..along th line in lE g- AA ai l 1 915 18 in tth idiltecliong 0f thearr Fi 6. is {at sectional-n w .takenisub tan iallyt alonstth 2 ,7 76,1 13 *lPatented Jan. 1, 1957 1.2 1ine-6-.-6.in Fig. 4A.,and lookinginthedirection of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view takensubstantially along the line .7-.+7 in Fig. 4B and. looking. 'inlthe. direction of 'the arrows;

Fig. 8 is a sectional .view taken substantially :along the line 8-8- in Fig. 4C and-looking in the direction of the arrows;

.Fig. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along the line 9.+9 inFig..4C-and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 10 .is a perspective-view of one of.the sealing plugs and the elongated sealing member passingrthrough the plug; and

Fig. 11 is a sectional view of one of the-.sealing plugs .with means associated therewith .for applying ,an initial compression to the fsealing plug for insuring efiectivesealing therearound even. though surrounding mudfluidpres- ;sures are relativelydow.

in ,oil well drilling operations 1utilizingdrillin equiptrnent-Hof the type discloseddn thevv aforementioned .-Bodine patent, it is necessary to provide.- a vibration generating lsiev eoro ei lator apa of v br ngth -m iv drill rod disposed at'the lower end -;of; the drill pipe string at substantially the resonant vibration frequency of the drill ,rod. ,Asatpraoticalrmatter, it;is,very difficult to provide laugh ;a vibration generator'whichz is;is o1ated from the -.fl w ng mu rfluid tha i pumped down the d i P p .;string in order to. drive-a motorforactuatingihe vibraitifin generator ;;and 1 to wash away earth formation fragments loosenedat thebottom Qfihe earth bore bya [drilling :bit {fastened to the lower end of thezvibratory [dlillrlfli Therefore oneof thedesirable features of the present; invention resides in the llnique vibration generator housing construction disclosed herein.

ReferriIlg now-specifically tothe drawingnwhereln like reference "numerals in dilferent viewsidentifyddentical :par'ts, 3 it is; contemplated that the drillrQidPhaVing a vibra- ;ti,on: genera t or, such as is disclosed herein, will be suspendedatcthe lower endofa :drill pipe stringin an earth iboreihole withthe drillpipe string being supported by a. derrick such as is disclosedin Fig. l of-the drawings. "This derrick for supporting the drill pipe string and vibrator-y drill rod is conventional in oil well drilling operations and includes a derrick 10, draw works ll, r driving 1 rotary table :12, kelly 13 extending through table 12, swivel 14 coupled to the upper endof the fluid passage through kelly 13 and hook 15 supporting the -bail of -sw'ivel 14. The h00k=15 is suspended through a travelling "block '16 and cable =17 from'the top of-thederrick '10 and the-cable 17" iswound on=the usual hoisting drumof the draw works 11. fMud-fluid, such "as is conventionally employedin oilwell 'drillingoperations, is pumped from 5 a-supply tank or sump 19 andis delivered under pressure by pumps20' through a pipe- 21 and hose,22 to the goose- .neck vof swivel 14, and from this point the mud fluid flows. down through the kelly '13 and'into and through ,a drill pipe string '23 coupled to.the lower end of the -kelly 13.

The kelly 13 and drill pipe string 23 extend into a bore hole 24 which extends downwardly into the earth. The bore hole 2.4 is lined or cased fora suitable distance downfrom the groundsurface by surface casing 25 which is supported by a landing.flange 26 resting on a concrete footing27 in the bottomofapitZS. A blow-out preventer .29.is mounted at the head of the casing .25 and a riser 30 above the blow-out preventer29 is provided witha mud ilow line or delivery. pipe 31. ,The mud flow line 31 ;,is shown .as .discha j ng O to ,,a conventional vibratory mud screen 3 2,. and the .mudis led from the latter back (t th sump r by means of avian line 33- The drill pipe string 23 coupled at the lower end of kelly 13 comprises a conventional drill pipe string made up of a number of drill pipe lengths 34 which may be coupled together by the usual tool joints. The drill pipe string 23 includes a massive elongated vibratory drill rod 35 connected to the lower end of the pipe string 23, with the drill rod 35 being provided with an earth cutting bit 36 at the lower end thereof. The vibration generator comprising the subject matter of the present invention is disposed at the upper end of the vibratory drill rod 35 and is indicated generally by reference numeral 37.

The vibration generator 37 is fastened at the top end 7 thereof to a driving turbine indicated generally by reference numeral 38 and shown only fragmentarily herein. The connection to the turbine 38 is by means of a joint comprising a plurality of bolts 39 extending vertically through a flange 40 and into a flange 41 at the lower end of the turbine housing.

The vibration generator or oscillator 37 is mounted within a housing which will now. be described in detail. This housing comprises a pair of complementary substantially semicylindrical elongated housing members 42 and 43. These housing members 42 and 43 are enclosed within an outer enclosing cylindrical member 44 and between the outer member 44 and inner housing members 42 and 43 are suitable passages for permitting mud fluid pumped down into the bore hole 23 by the mud pumps 26 to pass by the oscillator 37.

The cylindrical enclosing member 44 is threaded to the housing members 42 and 43 at its upper end, as indicated at 45, and at the lower end an internal nut 46 is threaded into the enclosing cylinder 44, as indicated at 47, to hold the structure integral. Suitable bolts or screws 48 similar to the bolts 39 are screwed through a flange 49 formed at the upper end of the sub 34 disposed immediately beneath the oscillator 37 and these bolts pass through the internal nut 46 and are threaded into the lower end of the housing members 42 and 43.

At the upper end of the housing members 42 and 43 they are cut away for the purpose of receiving a driving shaft 56 which leads from and is driven by the turbine 38. Suitable pilot bearings 51 are located at the upper end of the shaft 50 with needle bearings 52 being provided at the lower end of the shaft for maintaining the concentric alignment of the shaft 50 within the housing members 42 and 43. The housing members 42 and 43 are cut away as indicated at 53 for receiving the pilot bearings 51 and are cut away as indicated at 54 for receiving a spacer sleeve 55. Below the spacer sleeve 55 the housing members 42 and 43 are cut away for the purpose of receiving the needle bearing 52. An inwardly projecting flange 56 provides an abutment for the outer race for the needle bearings 52 while the spacer sleeve 55 serves to fix the longitudinal position of the outer race of needle bearing 52. A pair of snap rings 57 and 58 are respectivcly disposed between the sleeve 55 and the lowermost bearing 51 and between the uppermost bearing 51 and an inwardly projecting shoulder 59 formed on each mounting member 42 and 43. it is therefore apparent that the bearings 51 and 52 and sleeve 55 are all fixed longituclinally within the mounting members 42 and 43.

The inner race of each bearing 51 and 52 is firmly fixed to the outer periphery of shaft 50 and thus the bearings serve to pilot the shaft within the housing members 42 and 43.

At the lower end of the shaft 50 it is hollowed out as indicated at 66* and it has an outwardly projecting flange 61 thereon. A driving bevel gear 62 is secured to the flange 61 by means of a plurality of bolts 63.

The two mounting members 42 and 43 are respectively provided with a pair of mating surfaces designated respectively by reference numerals 64 and 65. The mating surface 64 on housing member 65 is provided with an elongated groove 66 on the right side as viewed in Figs. 4A, 4B and 4C and grooves 67 on the left side as viewed in Figs. 4A, 4B and 4C. The grooves 66 and 67 connect with a similar groove 68 formed in the surface 69 of an end member 70 which is rigidly mounted at the lower end of mounting member 42. The surface 69 of nember 7t mates against a surface 71 formed on a member 72 similar to the member 70 and integrally secured at the lower end of mounting member 43. An elongated resilient substantially incompressible sealing member 73 is disposed within the grooves 66, 67 and 68 and when the two mounting members 47. and 43 are tightened together by means of a plurality of bolts 74 arranged all along the longitudinal edges of said mounting members an effective seal is provided between the members 42 and 43. The mounting members 42 and 43 are cut away to provide a cavity 75 for housing the vibration generator elements which comprise four eccentrically mounted weights 76. Each of the weights 76 is fixed to a sleeve member 77 by means of a plurality of bolts 78 and each of the sleeve members 77 is integrally formed with a gear 79 thereon. The sleeves 77 are adapted to fit snugly around inner sleeve sections 80 and 81 having integral bearing surfaces 32 and 83 rotatably mounted on a supporting shaft 84. The sleeve sections 86 and 81 are each formed with a radially outwardly extending flange 85 which serves to retain the sleeve 77 therebetween. Suitable spacer washers 86 are disposed around the shaft 84 within cut-away portions 37 thereof and abut against the inside of the housing sections 42 and 43 in order to maintain the proper spacing of the sleeves 82 and 83.

The gear 79 is driven by a gear 88 secured to a shaft 89 having a bevel gear 90 thereon which is in continuous mesh with driving bevel gear 62. The shaft 89 is formed with shoulders 91 and 92 at either end thereof and these shoulders 91 and 92 respectively abut against the inner races of a pair of thrust bearings 93 and 94. The gear 79 which drives weight 76 is in continuous mesh with a gear 95 which is fastened to the next lower weight 76 for continuously driving the latter weight 76. The gear 95 meshes with an idler gear 96 which is concentrically mounted on a bearing sleeve 97 rotatable about a supporting shaft 98. The bearing sleeve 97 and gear 96 are fixed axially on the shaft 93 by means of a pair of thrust washers 99 and the thrust washers 99 are in turn held against axial displacement by means of a pair of split rings 106 which fit within suitable peripheral grooves formed around shaft 98.

The idler gear 96 in turn meshes with a gear 101 adapted to drive the third weight 76 and the gear 101 meshes with a gear 102 which drives the lowermost weight 76.

No further details regarding the construction of the weights 76 and gearing for driving the weights will be described herein as it is well-known that, with this arrangement of weights and driving gears, upon driving the series of weights, vertical forces tend to add and horizontal forces compensate for each other. Accordingly, the oscillator 37 generates vertical vibrations with a minimum of horizontal components.

To more thoroughly understand the manner in which the oscillator 37 generates the vibration forces, reference should be had to Fig. 3, wherein it is assumed that the gear 88 rotates in a clockwise direction. The top weight 76 and its driving gear 79 will therefore be driven in a counterclockwise direction and the second weight 76 and its driving gear 95 will be driven in a clockwise direction. Idler gear 96 will be driven in a counterclockwise direction and the third and fourth weights 76 will respectively be driving in clockwise and counterclockwise directions. It will be assumed that the weights are arranged as shown in Figs. 4A, 4B and 4C so that during the first increment of rotation of the weights there will be a component of force in an upward direction developed by each of the weights. At the same time, there will be components of force to the right generated by the top and bottom weights smears .Zfiau thes -horizentalacomponent t th rish il exact y c un ra d tby s que and oppo i .wh rizqn components ;of force to I the 3;: ft; developed by -.the, second and .third weights #6. ,As ;-.a result, there "will 51363110 turning couple developed by the ,oseillator ,37 ;which 3 w uld t nd t ge rate 'rh I ZO ta Yibrafi0 s- Aswill be apparent from Figs. AA, 43 .andAC and Fig. 6,t each of the-:housingssections ll and l-ii is .formed' with aplurality of semi-cylindrical pavities 1.03 for receiving the ,supporting shafts ,84 .for. each, of .the weights and the supporting shaft "98 for the ,idler gear .96 ;as .well as suitable cavities 119A and .105 .for .receiving .the thrust bearingsgiili land 8.4. ,Thehousing sectionzdlis provided .With-grooves1tl6 and-1X17. on theface 64 thereof adapted ,to mate iwithiacerfifinof.housing ,sectionA3. Each vof .these grooves v communicates .with thecavit es .103 and h gr v 1 communic tes swi h eroove 1 .4 while I groove 107.;commun icate s.with .cavity,105. A ;pun p .108, .to be described hereinafter, ;sup plies.;oil under pressure ,through {the grooves 1.0.6 and 5.107 for lubrieating ,the various ,mountir g shafts 84, .98 ;and..89 for .the different gears of the oscillator.

,Each of ,the mounting .shafts ..8 r4 ,is provided ..with a ,pair.,of,p,eripheral grooves ,109,disposed .at either end thereof andthese gIfOOYGS CQI JJmI1IiiQat6 WitiLDIle.Obmol'e a ,Pa sagc 111.0 .which, .in t n, com unicat th a centr l aXiaLPas a JH- h t su r ,pa sasedllsom- .m nicates .wit :a pl rali y.oflradially .eis enrlin na a .112 leading .to .theouter surface ,of .theshaftSA. .The

.innerb ar ng sle vememb rssfl an l ar leac .pr

vided with internal, peripheralgrooves,1113. Thus, fluid un nn e urei pumped through h dine 1.1 6. and 107 int lheperipher l,groove 109-v aM-throushnassasc .11 11.1 and i112 t p ripheral .gr oves .1 .formedpn .the

inner bear-ing; surf ce sof .the .sl ev :bearing ififl an 2. 1-

Th .oil .th .sasp axi lly rom .th .neripher.al .grooves .in .ord r t lubrica th sh aring surface .of t th shaft ,84 ,and the sleeve bearings ,80, and ,81.

he. supp rtin shaft 9,8 fo the idl gear i .96 .i Provi ed .wi h ,pe iphe a ;.sr.qove .11 whi h oinmunicate with the elongated grooves 106 and 107. The peripheral grooves 114 in turn communicate through a plurality of radial Passage which c m nicate .with an xi l Passage 116.connected with. .a. i a nassa 117 leading to the exterior of the shaft 98. Thus, oil is supplied to "the bearing surfacesof the-shaft 9,8:and the sleeve bearing 97 for lubricating .these surfaces.

iThe thrust bearings .105 and 104 are in directcommunieation-with-the grooves 11 06 an'd' 107 andthus-oil pressure is supplied to these hearings for properly lubricating them. The groove 106 extends upwardly to the turbine 38 as indicated. The groove 107 leads to the interior of the housing as indicated by openings 118 and excess oil above that required to lubricate the various shafts and thrust bearings is allowed to drip down through the oscillator and maintain a proper amount of lubricant on the meshing gears.

The pump 108 may be of any well-known type, such as the internal-external gear type or mating external gear type, for example, and is driven by a gear 120 which continuously meshes with the gear 102. The pump 108 draws oil from a sump 121 formed when the housing sections 42 and 43 are fastened together. The oil drawn from the sump 121 is pumped out through a pump outlet 122 which communicates with an external peripheral groove 123 extending around a base 124 of the pump 108. The output oil acts against a pressure regulator valve 125 comprising a ball check 126 held against a valve seat 127 by means of a compression spring 128. When the output pressure of the oil exceeds the value of the oil pressure necessary to unseat the ball check 126 from the seat 127, excess fluid passes out through a passage 129 which communicates with an external peripheral groove 130 formed on member 124. The groove 130 communicates with a plurality of passages 131 leading to and foaming to an undesirable ,degree.

in order to seal the ends of the semi-cylindrical cavities 103 and .105, a plurality of resilient substantially inc mpress bl plug l rwh ch mayi made Ofrubber orsorne similar material, aredisposed within the cavities. ,Each of these plugsis provided.with a centralaperture *141and'is cut, as at1'42,'for enabling the --pos itioning o'f sealingmernber 73in the .opening '141. "The plugs are adaptedto fit snugly within the cavities and when the housing members 42 are sealedtogether by tightening the bolts 7.4,.the sealing member73 and the plugs 1'40 tightly seal the entire cavity. 1,Whe n the oscillator is in operation, mud "fluid pressure of the order of several thousand p. s. i.,acts against tapered surfaces 143 at the outer ends of plugs 140 tendingto compress the plugs more tightly against the cavity walls and thuseffect a 'better seal.

=I n "11 means are shown for effectingan initial seal of the plugs 1 40 and thismeans comprises a pressure disc 144 adaptedto act againstthetapered surfaces "1 43. A threaded screw '145 having a nut 1'46 -threadedtherearound is positioned with the nut 146b ehind;a-stop-washer'147. When-the screwyl'4'5 is turned,

"it compresses the pressure plate 1'44 against the plug 140 to provide an initial compression of the tapered 'Wails14 3 against the confining walls of thecavity ,103.

From "I118 foregoing description ;of the present inven- "tion itis apparent 'thatjit provides an improved vibration --generator housing incorporating features enabling ease of assembly and which facilitate sealingof the-housing against severe externalpressures. It is contemplated that the presently disclosed oscillator housing will be capable of sealing out mud fluid at pressures of up to several thousand pounds per square inch.

"Itis contemplated that numerous changes and modifications may be made in the present invention without de- -parting=from-the spirit'or scope thereof,

What is ;claimedis:

'1. A hou'sing for a vibration-generatorhaving a plura lity of rotary-vibration generating elements, said'liousing comprising a pair of complementary substantially semi-cylindrical housing members having surfaces adapted to mate with each other and thereby provide a substantially cylindrical housing, means providing a seal between the mating surfaces of said housing members, means providing facing openings in said mating surfaces and diametrically opposed to each other for mounting supporting shafts for said vibration generating elements, and sealing means for the outside ends of said openings comprising resilient substantially incompressible plugs.

2. A housing for a vibration generator having a plurality of rotary vibration generating elements for vibrating a massive vibratory earth boring drill rod, said housing comprising a pair of complementary substantially semi-cylindrical housing members having surfaces adapted to mate with each other and thereby provide a substantially cylindrical housing, means providing a seal between the mating surfaces of said housing members, said housing members being provided with facing openings in said mating surfaces diametrically opposed to each other for mounting supporting shafts for said vibration generating elements, an enclosing cylindrical member disposed around said housing members and together with said housing members including means defining longitudinally extending passages for conveying pressurized mud fluid therethrough, and sealing means for the outside ends of said openings comprising resilient substantially incompressible plugs for sealing out the mud fluid from said housing.

3. A housing for a vibration generator having a plurality of rotary vibration generating elements for vibrating a massive vibratory earth boring drill rod, said housing comprising a pair of complementary substantially semi-cylindrical housing members having surfaces adapted to mate with each other and thereby provide a substantially cylindrical housing, means providing a seal between the mating surfaces of said housing members,

said housing members including means defining facing openings in the mating surfaces thereof and said openings being diametrically opposed for mounting supporting shafts for said vibration generating elements, an enclosing cylindrical member disposed around said housing members and together with said housing members including means defining longitudinally extending passages for conveying pressurized mud fluid therethrough, and sealing means for the outside ends of said openings comprising resilient substantially incompressible plugssubstantially cylindrical housing, said semi-cylindrical.

members including means defining pairs of facing openings in the mating surfaces thereof and the openings of each pair being diametrically opposed for mounting shafts in said housing, and means for sealing said members together and comprising resilient substantially incompressible plugs adapted to be tightly fitted in the outer ends of said openings, one of said mating surfaces being formed with an elongated groove extending therearound, said plugs being formed with central apertures adapted to be disposed in alignment with said groove when the plugs are disposed in said openings, and an elongated resilient substantially incompressible sealing member disposed in said groove and extending through said apertures for providing a seal between said semicylindrical members.

5. A housing comprising a pair of complementary members having surfaces adapted to mate with each other to provide an enclosed housing for mounting apparatus therein, said complementary members including means defining facing openings in the mating surfaces thereof for facilitating mounting said apparatus in the housing,

and means for sealing said complementary members together and comprising resilient substantially incompressible plugs adapted to be tightly fitted in the outer ends of said facing openings, one of said mating surfaces being formed with an elongated groove extending therearound, said plugs being formed with generally centrally located apertures adapted to be disposed in alignment with said groove when the plugs are disposed in said facing openings, and an elongated resilient substantially incompressible sealing member disposed in said groove and extending through said apertures for providing a seal between said complementary members.

6. A housing for a vibration generator having a plurality of rotary vibration generator elements for vibrating a massive vibratory earth boring drill rod, said housing comprising a pair of complementary substantially semi-cylindrical housing members having surfaces adapted to mate with each other and thereby provide a substantially cylindrical housing, said complementary members including means defining facing openings in the mating surfaces thereof for mounting supporting shafts for said vibration generating elements, an enclosing cylindrical member disposed around said housing members and together with said housing members including means defining longitudinally extending passages for conveying pressurized mud fluid therethrough, and means for sealing said complementary members together for preventing the admission of the mud fluid thereinto and including resilient substantially incompressible plugs adapted to be tightly fitted in the outer ends of said facing openings, one of the mating surfaces being formed with an elongated groove extending therearound, said plugs being formed with generally centrally located apertures adapted to be disposed in alignment with said groove when the plugs are disposed in said facing openings, and an elongated resilient substantially incompressible sealing member disposed in said groove and extending through said apertures for providing a seal between said complementary members for sealing out the mud fluid from the vibration generating elements within the housing.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,234,948 Sperry July 31, 1917 2,166,285 Brown July 18, 1939 2,554,005 Bodine May 22, 1951 2,650,992 Forss et al. Sept. 1, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1234948 *Sep 13, 1915Jul 31, 1917American Well WorksCentrifugal pump.
US2166285 *Jan 19, 1935Jul 18, 1939Gen Motors CorpCushioning device for electric motors
US2554005 *Dec 11, 1950May 22, 1951Soundrill CorpEarth boring apparatus
US2650992 *Jan 10, 1952Sep 1, 1953Oster John Mfg CoEnd bell assembly for dynamo-electric machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3190369 *Jan 24, 1963Jun 22, 1965Galis Mfg CompanyRotary percussion rock drilling apparatus
US4796713 *Apr 14, 1987Jan 10, 1989Bechem Ulrich WActivated earth drill
US5409070 *Oct 18, 1993Apr 25, 1995Roussy; Raymond J.Coupling for rotary-vibratory drills
US7647988Sep 6, 2007Jan 19, 2010Raymond J. RoussyMethod and system for installing geothermal transfer apparatuses with a sonic drill
US7891440Feb 22, 2008Feb 22, 2011Roussy Raymond JMethod and system for installing geothermal transfer apparatuses with a sonic drill and a removable or retrievable drill bit
US8002502Jan 18, 2010Aug 23, 2011Raymond J. RoussyMethod and system for installing cast-in-place concrete piles with a sonic drill
US8074740Dec 13, 2010Dec 13, 2011Roussy Raymond JMethod and system for installing cast-in-place concrete piles with a sonic drill and a removable or retrievable drill bit
US8132631Oct 31, 2007Mar 13, 2012Roussy Raymond JMethod of geothermal loop installation
US8136611Aug 19, 2009Mar 20, 2012Roussy RaymondMethod and system for installing micropiles with a sonic drill
US8210281Jan 18, 2010Jul 3, 2012Roussy RaymondMethod and system for installing geothermal transfer apparatuses with a sonic drill
Classifications
U.S. Classification175/55, 74/61, 366/600, 173/49
International ClassificationE21B7/24
Cooperative ClassificationE21B7/24, Y10S366/60
European ClassificationE21B7/24