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Publication numberUS2776710 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1957
Filing dateFeb 10, 1955
Priority dateFeb 10, 1955
Publication numberUS 2776710 A, US 2776710A, US-A-2776710, US2776710 A, US2776710A
InventorsHomery Alex L, Simon Morris A
Original AssigneeYoungstown Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for processing tenuous material
US 2776710 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 8, 1957 A. L. HOMERY ET AL APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING TENUOUS MATERIAL 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 10, 1955 q i l INVENTORS max L..HOMERY MORRIS n. SIMON Rffb may Jan. 8, 1957 A. HOMERY ET AL APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING TENUOUS MATERIAL 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 10, 1955 INVENTORS HLEX L. HQMERY MORRIS R. SIMQN Jan. 8, 1957 1 HOMERY ET AL 2,776,710

APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING TENUOUS MATERIAL Filed Feb. 10, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTORS HL'EX. L. HOMERY MORRIS H. SIMON Jan. 8, 1957 HOMERY ET AL 2,776,710

APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING TENUOUS MATERIAL Filed Feb. 10, 1955 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 l N -I $3 xx 0 n N *5 INVENTORS FLEX Ll. HOMERY MORRIS Fl. SIMON United States Patent APPARATUS FOR PROCESSING TENUOUS MATERIAL Alex L. Homery, Jamestown, Pa. ,and Morris A. Simon, Youngstown, Ohio, assignors to Youngstown Industries, Inc., Girard, Ohio, n corporation of Ohio Application February 1Q,;1955,:Seriol.No. 487,300

8 Claims. (Cl. 164-60) The present invention relates to apparatusfor processing tenuous material, more particularly to apparatus for longitudinally slitting tenuous material such as strip and the like, and the principal object of the invention is to provide new and improved apparatus of the character described. 7

When conventional slitting apparatus is employed to longitudinally slit strip material into two or more strips of a predetermined width, it isnecessary to cut a small amount of material ofi each side of the strip in addition to the cut (or cuts) which divides the strip into the requisite sizes. This is necessary since practically all lengths of strip material have a certain amount of camber (or deviation of at-marginal edge of the strip from a straight line). If the strip is not trued by cutting a piece off each side, it is very difficult to maintain the width of the pieces being slit. f

it will readily be apparent that when large quantities of strip material are cut with conventional slitters, a considerable amount of scrap is produced with resultant financial loss. The present invention eliminates such scrap losses by providing a novel slitter which will accurately cut the strip longitudinally to any desirable width along a line (or a plurality of lines if more than one cut is made in the strip) generally parallel with the strip edges.

While each of the pieces cut from strip by the present invention will have the same camber (if camber exists) as the original unslit strip, this factor is of little consequence in many fields since, during later processing, each piece of strip will often be cut into relatively vshort lengths. Other advantages of the present invention will become apparent from a study of the following description and from the drawings appended hereto.

In the drawings accompanying this specification and forming a part of this application there are shown, for purpose of illustration, embodiments which our invention may assume, and in these drawings:

Figure 1 is a generally diagrammatic side elevational view of the' present invention in use in a conventional strip processing line,

Figure 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the invention, 1

Figure 3 is a reduced size, top plan view of the invention shown in a central position in full lines and in positions on each side of the central position by dot dash lines,

Figure 4 is an enlarged sectional view generally corresponding to the line -4-4 of Figure 3,

Figure 5 is anenlarged broken end elevational view of the invention,

Figure 6 is .a view similar to Figure 2 but showing certain operating parts in another position,

Figure 7 is an enlarged, longitudinal sectional view of a portion of strip which may be used with the present invention,

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic view of a modification of the invention, and

Ice

Figures 9 and 10 are exaggerated plan views of sections of strip material which are adapted to be longitudinally slit. Y

The herein disclosed .slitter is of the conventional type in which rotatably supported slitter knives, or discs, are disposed in juxtaposed relation so as to severstrip passed therebetween. Moreover, the herein disclosed slitter is the type in which the .slitter knives are not driven but merely rotate in response to tangential forces as the strip is pulled therethrough.

Referring to Figure 1, the slitter 10 is shown in use with a conventional strip processing line which, in the present embodiment, includes an oven 11, pinch rolls 12 and a coiler 13 upon which the strip S is adapted to be wound. The pinch rolls l2 sprovide a pass for the strip, the rolls 'being adapted to be rotated in the direction of the arrows by any suitable-drive means to pull the strip through the line. Although not shown, the line may include other apparatus such as a pay-oh reel for feeding strip to the oven and suitable coating apparatus for depositing paint or the like upon the strip prior to its entrance into the oven.

It is to be understood that the pull of pinch rolls 12 will be resisted by any suitable means so that the strip will be under tension as it passes through the slitter 10. This may be accomplished in various ways; for example, a brake may be provided upon the pay-off reel (not shown) or rolls 14 may be provided which are engageable with the strip in the same manner as are pinch rolls 12. In the event rolls 14 are employed, they may be driven at a slower speed than are rolls 12 or they may be provided with a suitable brake so as to place the moving strip under tension.

Referring particularly to Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5, the slitter herein shown comprises a pair of externally threaded, spaced apart arbors 15, 16. Arbor 15 is rotatably supported by spaced-apart arms 17, 17 and arbor 16 is rotatably supported by spaced-apart arms 18, 18. In the present embodiment, the strip S is to be slit into two pieces; accordingly, each arbor 15, 16 carries but a single slitter "knife 19 each of which is locked in position upon its respective arbor by means of collars Z0 1 threaded upon the arbors and positioned on each side of a respective slitter knife (see especially Figure 5).

It will be appreciated that in the event more than one cut is to he made in the strip, additional knives may be mounted upon the arbors..

'As best shown in Figure 5, arms 17, '17 are adapted to be joined together by means of a bar 21 which is Welded or otherwise secured'in position and arms 18, 18 are similarly joined together by means of a bar 22. For a purpose later .to become clear, bar 21 extends beyond respective arms 17, 17.

Adjoining arms 17, 18 are pivotally secured to a bracket 23 and each bracket (see especially Figures 3 and 5) is secured by any suitable means to a plate 24. As best seen in Figure 4, a plate 25 underlies the plate 24 in side-by-side relation, the plates 24 vand 25 being pivotally secured together by means of a bearing 26, a stub shaft 27 and capscrews 28 which removably secure the stub shaft to plate 24. Stub shaft 27 provides an axis about which the plate 24 and the slitter knives carried thereby are shiftable for purpose to become clear, the knives being spaced from this axis in a direction along the line of strip movement for reasons later to appear.

Means are provided for supporting plate 25 for movement edgewise of the strip and in a direction transversely of its line of movement and, at the present time, a pair of transversely extending guides 29 are secured in parallel, spaced-apart relation to plate 25 by means of capscrews 30. The adjoining faces of guides 29 are provided with V grooves in which complementarily shaped rollers 31, rotatably carried by a plate 32, are adapted to be respectively seated. Plate 32, as illustrated in Figure 1, is adapted to be fixedly secured to a base, or stand, 33 by any suitable means.

From the foregoing it will be understood that plates 24, and the slitter knives carried by arms 17, 18 are shiftable transversely of the line of movement of the strip along the rollers 31 (see Figure 3). Additionally, plate 24 and the slitter knives carried by arms 17, 18 are pivotable about the axis of bearing 26 and stub shaft 27 (see Figure 3).

Means are provided for maintaining plate 24 and the parts carried thereby in predetermined position relative to the strip. Such means presently comprises strip guide rollers 34 (see especially Figures 3 and 4) positioned on opposite sides of the strip and having peripheries adapted for engagement therewith. Each roller 34 is rotatably carried by a bracket which is secured to plate 24, it being understood the brackets are adjustable along the plate 24 and in a direction edgewise of the strip to provide for handling various strip widths. Adjustment of the brackets 35 may be accomplished by providing slots in the brackets, the slots being elongated in the direction of adjustment and passing fastening bolts.

As previously described, plate 24 is free to move edgewise of the strip along guides 29 and rollers 31; accordingly, since guide rollers 34 are engaged with the strip edges, plate 24 has a floating action which permits it to follow the strip despite the latters deviation from a straight line. Moreover, since plate 24 is free to pivot about the axis of stub shaft 27, the plate will turn about this axis to closely follow the curvature of the strip. This will maintain the axes of arbors 15, 16 normal to the longitudinal axis of the strip to insure smooth cutting action.

It should be pointed out that an important feature of the present invention is the fact that all of the guide rollers 34, which cause the plate 24 and the slitter knives to follow the curvature of the strip, engage the uncut portion of the strip. It will be appreciated that guiding action of the rollers 34 would be less effective if these guide rollers engaged the strip after it was cut. Accordingly, the slitter knives are spaced from the plate 24 in a direction along the line of strip movement.

The present slitter is adapted for use in a continuous strip line; that is, one in which the trailing end of one 0011 of strip being fed to the line is secured to the leading end of the next successive coil in order that the line may operate continuously. As shown in Figure l, the leading and trailing ends of the strip are overlapped and then secured together by staples 36 or by lap welding or in any other suitable manner. Since the overlapped portions of the strip might damage the slitter and since such portions are of no use and are normally cut from the strip prior to its further processing, means are provided to render the slitter inoperative at the point where the strips are joined.

With particular reference to Figures 2 and 5, a fluid cylinder 37 is pivotally secured to each arm 18 by means of a suitable pivot pin 38. The extending end of the piston rod 39 of each cylinder 37 is pivotally secured between the legs of a respective bifurcated member 40 which is welded or otherwise secured to the respective extending portions of bar 21. In the presently disclosed embodiment, fluid conduits 41, 42 extend from cylinders 37 to a control valve 43 (see Figure l) which is in turn connected to a source of fluid under pressure by means of a conduit 44.

At the present time, valve 43 is manually actuated by the operator immediately prior to the time the spliced portion of the strip enters the slitter. In the normal or strip slitting position of the slitter, the slitter knives 19 are held together, as shown in Figures 1, 2 and 5, by

means of the cylinder 37. The operator, upon perceiving that the spliced portion of the strip is about to enter the slitter, will shift the actuator of valve 43. This will cause the cylinders 37 to shift the slitter knives apart (see Figure 6) to permit the spliced portion of the strip to pass through. After the spliced portion has cleared the slitter, the operator will return the valve to its normal position and the cylinders will thereupon move the knives together once again to resume the slitting operation.

While the embodiment thus far disclosed providm for manual operation of the cylinders 37, it will readily be apparent that they could be operated automatically in response to the position of the spliced portion of the strip relative to the slitter.

By way of illustration and as diagrammatically shown in Figure 8, a limit switch may be positioned in advance of a slitter 10a (similar in all respects to slitter 10) and have its actuator engaged with the strip. When the overlapped portion of the strip engages the actuator, normally open contacts of the switch will be moved to closed position. This will cause current to flow in circuit 50 and start the operation of a time delay device. After a predetermined length of time (the time being determined by the speed of the moving strip and by the distance the limit switch is spaced from the slitter knives) the time delay device will cause current to flow to a solenoid valve which will effect fluid flow to the cylinders 37a in manner to separate the slitter knives immediately prior to the time the overlapped portion of the strip reaches the knives. After another predetermined length of time, the time delay device will again actuate the solenoid valve to cause the cylinders 37a to move the knives together immediately after the overlapped portion of the strip has passed beyond the knives.

Referring now to Figure 9 wherein a section of strip material having an exaggerated amount of camber is shown, it will be seen that with conventional slitters it is necessary to cut along both edges of the strip in addition to cutting along the center thereof in order to provide two strips of equal predetermined width. However, with the present invention and as shown in Figure It), a single cut which follows the camber of the strip is made down the center thereof thus dividing it into two strips of equal width.

It is to be clearly understood that while in the interest of simplicity the presently disclosed embodiment illustrates cutting a strip down the center into two equal pieces, such cut may, if desired, be made at any other point between the edges of the strip. Moreover, the strip may be cut into three or more pieces, if desired.

In operation, the slitter herein disclosed will be positioned in manner wherein the axis of the stub shaft 27 coincides with the center of the strip and rollers 34 adjusted to engage respective edges of the strip. Accordingly, even though the strip is cambered, the carriage provided by plate 24 will closely follow the curvature of the strip because the plate is free to shift edgewise of the strip and also free to pivot about the axis of stub shaft 27. Since the present embodiment is adapted to cut the strip into two equal width pieces, the slitter knives will be maintained in the center of the strip and the axes of the arbors 15, 16 will be maintained normal to the longitudinal axis of the strip to insure smooth cutting action.

In view of the foregoing it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that we have accomplished at least the principal object of our invention and it will also be apparent to those skilled in the art that the embodiments herein described may be variously changed and modified, without departing from the spirit of the invention, and that the invention is capable of uses and has advantages not herein specifically described, hence it will be appreciated that the herein disclosed embodiments are illustrative only, and that our invention is not limited thereto.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising cutting means engaged with the strip for dividing it longitudinally as it moves therepast, means holding said cutting means against the longitudinal pull exerted thereon by the moving strip and comprising means providing an axis mounted for movement in a direction edgewise of the strip and about which said cutting means is swingable edgewise of the strip in response to the pull of the latter, said axis being spaced from said cutting means in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the strip, and means for maintaining said axis in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of the latter from a straight line.

2. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising a rotatably mounted cutting wheel engaged with the strip and rotated by the longitudinal force exerted thereon by the strip moving therepast, means holding said cutting wheel against the longitudinal pull exerted thereon by the moving strip and comprising means providing an axis mounted for movement in a direction edgewise of the strip and about which said cutting wheel is swingable edgewise of said strip in response to the pull of the latter, said axis being spaced from said cutting wheel in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the strip, and means for maintaining said axis in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of the latter from a straight line.

3. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising a carriage mounted for movement in a direction edgewise of the strip, means providing a pivot carried by and movable with said carriage, means for maintaining said carriage and said pivot carried thereby in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of such edge from a straight line, and cutting means engageable with the strip and having a predetermined spaced relation with said edge of the strip and being spaced from said pivot in the direction of strip movement, said cutting means being swingable about said pivot in a direction edgewise of the strip and trailing therebehind in response to the longitudinal pull exerted on said cutting means by the moving strip.

4. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising a carriage mounted for movement in a direction edgewise of the strip, means providing a pivot carried by and movable with said carriage, means for maintaining said carriage and said pivot carried thereby in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of such edge from a straight line, and a rotatably mounted cutting wheel having an annular cutting edge engaged with the strip, said cutting wheel being rotated by the tangential force exerted thereon by the strip moving therepast and said cutting wheel being spaced from said pivot in the direction of strip movement and being swingable about said pivot in a direction edgewise of the strip in response to the longitudinal pull exerted on said cutting wheel by the moving strip, the plane of rotation of said cutting edge being so related to said pivot that the longitudinal pull of the moving strip causes said cutting wheel to trail behind said pivot with said cutting edge plane in alignment with the longitudinal axis of the strip.

5. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising a carriage mounted for rectilinear movement in a direction edgewise of the strip, means for maintaining said carriage in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of such edge from a straight line, a pair of arms pivotally secured to said carriage and each rotatably supporting a cutting wheel one of which has an annular cutting edge, said arms being relatively movable toward and away from each other to efiiect movement of said cutting wheels toward and away from engagement with said strip and said cutting wheels being disposed in juxtaposition on opposite sides of the strip and being rotated by the tangential force exerted thereon by the strip moving therepast, and means holding said cutting wheels against the longitudinal pull exerred thereon by the moving strip and comprising means providing a pivot mounted for movement with said carriage in a direction edgewise of said strip and about which said cutting wheels are swingable edgewise of the strip in response to the pull of the latter, said pivot being spaced from said cutting wheels in a direction opposite to the direction of movement of the strip and the plane of rotation of said cutting edge being so related to said pivot that the longitudinal pull of the moving strip causes said cutting wheels to trail behind said pivot with said cutting edge plane in alignment with the longitudinal axis of the strip.

6. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving strip material, comprising a carriage mounted for movement in a direction edgewise of the strip, means providing a pivot carried by and movable with said carriage, means for maintaining said carriage and said pivot carried thereby in predetermined relation with an edge of the strip despite deviation of such edge from a straight line, a pair of rotatably mounted cutting wheels relatively movable toward each other for cutting engagement with opposite sides of the strip and relatively movable away from each other out of cutting engagement with the strip, said cutting wheels being rotated by the tangential force exerted thereon by the strip moving therepast and said cutting Wheels being spaced from said pivot in the direction of strip movement and being swingable about said pivot in a direction edgewise of the strip in response to the longitudinal pull exerted on said cutting wheels by the moving strip, and fluid cylinder means for efiecting relative move ment of said cutting wheels toward and away from each other.

7. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving lengths of strip material which are joined together in end-to-end relation, comprising a pair of rotatably mounted cutting Wheels relatively movable toward each other for cutting engagement with opposite sides of the strip and relatively movable away from each other out of cutting engagement with the strip, and means for effecting said relative movement of said cutting wheels and responsive to the joint between said lengths of strip to move said cutting wheels out of cutting engagement with the strip upon arrival of said joint thereat and to move said cutting wheels into cutting engagement with the strip after passage of such joint therebeyond.

8. Apparatus for slitting longitudinally moving lengths of strip material which are joined together in end-to-end, overlapping relation, comprising a pair of rotatably mounted cutting wheels relatively movable toward each other for cutting engagement with opposite sides of the strip and relatively movable away from each other out of cutting engagement with the strip, and fluid cylinder means for effecting said relative movement of said cutting wheels and responsive to the overlapped portions of strip to move said cutting wheels out of cutting engagement with the strip upon arrival of such overlapped portion thereat and to move said cutting wheels into cutting engagement with the strip after passage of such overlapped portion therebeyond.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US1306642 *Jun 5, 1914Jun 10, 1919THE FIRESTONE TIRE a RUBBER COMPANYstevens
US1333588 *Aug 30, 1916Mar 9, 1920Goodyear Tire & RubberSelvage-trimmer
US1367068 *Jul 16, 1918Feb 1, 1921Firestone Tire & Rubber CoSelvage-trimmer
US1379597 *Nov 6, 1918May 24, 1921Goodyear Tire & RubberSelvage-trimmer
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US2107953 *Oct 1, 1936Feb 8, 1938Basil Morley Wilfrid ThomasApparatus for removing selvage edges from textile fabrics in the piece
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3603190 *Aug 21, 1969Sep 7, 1971United Eng Foundry CoRotary plate-slitting shear
US3961547 *Nov 20, 1974Jun 8, 1976Maurice ShainbergPaper scoring and slitting machine
US5904085 *Jan 22, 1997May 18, 1999Onishilite Industry Co., Ltd.Sheet material cutting apparatus
EP0021821A1 *Jun 24, 1980Jan 7, 1981The Head Wrightson Machine Company LimitedApparatus and method for trimming strip material
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/368, 83/482, 83/499
International ClassificationB23D19/00, B23D19/04, B21D21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23D19/04, B21D21/00
European ClassificationB23D19/04, B21D21/00