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Publication numberUS2776913 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1957
Filing dateDec 17, 1952
Priority dateDec 17, 1952
Publication numberUS 2776913 A, US 2776913A, US-A-2776913, US2776913 A, US2776913A
InventorsAnderson William E
Original AssigneeRiegel Paper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-water repellent high slip paper
US 2776913 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NON-WATER REPELLENT HIGH SLIP PAPER William E. Anderson, Bloomsbury, N. J., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Riegel Paper Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application December 17, 1952, Serial No. 326,578

Claims. (Cl. 117-92) N 0 Drawing.

I Thisinvention relates to high slip paper which is easily wet with water adhesives. tion relates to the production of a paper such as sized glassine paper having a high degree of slip but which is easily wet with water adhesives and at the same time has relatively low water absorbency.

Surface slip is generally imparted to papers by the use of wax emulsions, such as emulsions of parafiin or carnauba wax and combinations of them. Other emulsions such as emulsions of hydrogenated oils, stearic acid, solubilized metallic soaps and fatty acid derivatives have also been used for this purpose. These materials, however, while imparting a desirable degree of slip to the paper, also impart water repellency, and water adhesives will not glue the paper satisfactorily, due to poor wettability and poor adhesion.

The present invention provides an improved high slip paper which is easily wet with water adhesives and which can be wet and glued together with aqueous adhesives.

The improved high slip, non-water repellent paper is also advantageously a paper with relatively low water absorbency; and such papers can advantageously be made by the treatment of highly sized glassine paper to impart a desirable slip and easily wet surface thereto.

According to the present invention, paper, and particularly sized glassine paper, is coated with a thin coating of water soluble polyethylene glycol wax-like solids sold under the trade name Carbowax; or by treating such surfaces with such wax-like solids together with a small quantity of a wax emulsion.

The polyethylene glycols are polymers which range from liquids to wax like solids. Those which are above 1000 in molecular weight are the waxlike solids soluble in water and sold under the trade name Carbowax.

I have found that paper, and particularly glassine paper, treated with Carbowax, and combinations of Carbowax with various wax emulsions, will produce a Wettable paper which has an improved slip surface. I have found that when sized glassine paper is treated with Carbowax, or combinations of Carbowax with such wax emulsions, the resulting paper not only has an improved slip but can be successfully glued with water adhesives and still have relatively low water absorbency.

When wax emulsions are used with the Carbowax, the amount of wax emulsion will be relatively small in amount and amounts which would impart water repellency should be avoided.

A sized glassine paper is advantageously treated according to the present invention to provide paper with a desirable degree of slip, which is easily wet with water adhesives, and which will have relatively low water absorbency. Highly sized glassine paper can be readily produced, e. g., by sizing glassine paper with 1% or 2% of rosin size, the size reducing the water absorbency of the paper.

Different wax emulsions can be used in small amount in addition to and admixture with the Carbowax. One suitable emulsion is the so-called opal wax emulsion illus- More particularly, the inventrated by the following composition, the parts being by weight:

45 parts hydrogenated castor oil (opal wax) 13.5 parts stearic acid 6 parts triethanolamine 520 parts water The invention will be further illustrated by the following examples, but it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto. In the following examples, the solid polyethylene glycols referred to as Carbowax 4000 and Carbowax 6000 are polyethylene glycols having average molecular weights between 3000 and 3700, and 6000 and 7500, respectively.

Example 1 A 25-pound glassine paper was treated at the size press with a solution containing 1.3% of Carbowax 4000, and the coated paper was dried on the usual drying roll. The slip properties of the resulting paper were considerably better than those of the untreated glassine paper.

The amount of Carbowax used can be varied, e. g., by using a 2% to 5% Carbowax solution, or a 2% Carbowax solution contaiing 1/10% of the above opal wax emulsion.

Example 2 A 30-pound glassine paper sized with 1% of rosin size was treated at the size press with 2% Carbowax solution and the paper dried on the drying rolls.

Example 3 The same paper referred to in Example 2 was similarly treated with a 3% Carbowax solution.

Example 4 The same paper as in Example 2 was treated at the size press with a 2% Carbowax solution which also contained admixed therewith l/ 10% of the opal wax emulsion above referred to, and the paper was dried on the drying rolls.

Example 5 A 30-pound glassine paper sized with 2% rosin size was treated at the size press with a 5% Carbowax 6000 solution and the paper was dried on the drying rolls.

Example 6 The sample paper as in Example 5 and treated with a solution of 5% Carbowax 6000 and 1.7% wax emulsion containing 40% of a wax mixture composed of paraflin wax and 25% carnauba wax.

All of the papers of these examples had improved slip as compared with the untreated paper, and also had the advantage that they were not water repellent but instead could be readily wet with water adhesives, and also had desirably low water absorbency. Low water absorbency is desirable and advantageous when the paper is secured together with a water adhesive, as when the paper is spirally wound and glued with water adhesives to a paper tube.

In the above examples, Carbowax 4000 and 6000 are referred to. Carbowax 6000, which is a somewhat harder wax, produces a surface with somewhat moreslip than Carbowax 4000. The hardness of the wax can be varied, and the amount of the wax can also be varied, but in all cases the Carbowax is a water-soluble wax or wax-like solids with the combined features and advantages of imparting a desirable slip surface and a surface which is readily wet and with which water adhesives can be used.

The term wax is used herein and in the appended claims in its generic sense to include the so-called true waxes, namely substances of animal and vegetable origin, which are fatty acids in combination with alcohols, as

well as the mineral waxes and the synthetic waxes, which are water-insoluble compounds closely resembling the true waxes in physical properties.

I claim:

=1. Paper having a desira'hledegree of slip and being readily wet with water adhesives, said paper having asurface coating consisting vess'entiallyof water soluhlesolid polyethylene glycol admixed with a smaller amount of small particles of a water-insoluble wax.

2. Paper sized with a water-repellant composition having a desirable degree of slip and being readily wet with wateradhesives, said paper having a surface coating consisting essentially of water soluble solid polyethylene glycol admixed with a smaller amount of small particles of a waterinsoluble wax. 3. Glassine paper having a'desirable degree of'slip and being readily 'wet with water adhesives, said paper having a surface coating consisting essentially of water-soluble solid polyethylene glycol admixed with a smaller amount of small particles of a water-insoluble wax.

4. Glassinepaper sized with a water-repellant composition having a desirable degree of slip and being readily wet with water adhesives, said paper having a surface coating consisting essentially of water soluble solid polyethylene glycol.

5. Glassine paper sized with a water-repellant composition having a desirable degree of slip and being readily wet with water adhesives, said paper having a surface coating consisting essentially of water soluble solid polyethylene glycol admixed with a smaller amount of small particles of a water-insoluble wax.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,340,846 Landes Feb. 1, 1944 2,480,352 Bicknell Aug. 30, 1949 2,692,228 Clancy Oct. 19, 1954 v OTHER REFERENCES Synthetic Organic Chemicals Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corp., 12th ed., pages 19-23.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2340846 *Jan 18, 1941Feb 1, 1944American Cyanamid CoWax emulsion
US2480352 *Nov 4, 1944Aug 30, 1949Warren S D CoSeparable liner for tacky elastomers
US2692228 *Dec 29, 1950Oct 19, 1954Faximile IncElectrolytic recording paper
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2914167 *Mar 26, 1956Nov 24, 1959Johnson & JohnsonPressure sensitive adhesive tape and method of manufacture
US3035267 *Jul 1, 1959May 15, 1962Kienzle Apparate GmbhRecording apparatus
US3400717 *May 21, 1965Sep 10, 1968Colgate Palmolive CoDiapers
US3533822 *Jun 10, 1968Oct 13, 1970Int Paper CoVitreous decalcomania and coated paper base
US4238531 *Nov 21, 1977Dec 9, 1980Lever Brothers CompanyAdditives for clothes dryers
US4327133 *Jun 20, 1980Apr 27, 1982Lever Brothers CompanyAdditives for clothes dryers
US4421792 *Mar 10, 1982Dec 20, 1983Lever Brothers CompanyAdditives for clothes dryers
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/487, 106/271, 427/416, 106/270
International ClassificationD21H19/24, D21H19/18, D21H27/06, D21H19/00, D21H27/00
Cooperative ClassificationD21H19/24, D21H27/06, D21H27/001, D21H19/18
European ClassificationD21H27/00B