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Publication numberUS2777603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1957
Filing dateApr 4, 1952
Priority dateApr 4, 1952
Publication numberUS 2777603 A, US 2777603A, US-A-2777603, US2777603 A, US2777603A
InventorsHarold D Baum
Original AssigneeHarold D Baum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vending machine
US 2777603 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1957 H. D. BAUM VENDING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 4, 1952 INVENTOR.

HAROLD D. BAUM BY 11 AHY Jan. 15, 1957 H. D. BAUM 2,777,603

VENDING MACHINE Filed April 4. 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. HAROLD D. BAUM ATTY.

Jan. 15, 1957 H. D. BAUM 2,

VENDING MACHINE Filed April 4. 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet s H FIG. F I

FIGJZ 35 36 29 M 32 #[l on 0Q 'FIGJIS INVENTOR. E" HAROLD 0.5141114 2 BY K) 22 I F O.I--

Jan. 15, 1957 H. D. BAUM 2,777,603

' VENDING MACHINE Filed April 4, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. HAROLD D. BAUM United States Patent VENDENG MAC Harold D. Baum, Chicago, ill.

Application April 4, 1952, Serial No. 280,612

15 Claims. (Cl. 22184) This invention relates to vending machines. It provides an automatic machine, of this type which commands a particularly high degree of selling appeal, while involving simple and inexpensive construction and maintenance.

The new machine has a number of superposed shelves, each with a number of magazine channels, arranged side by side. The shelves and channels are so disposed that a variety of types of merchandiseusually one type per channelcan be displayed and automatically vended, and that it is possible at least for a great majority of types of merchandise to be fully displayed and efiiciently manipulated without wrapping or packing; a feature which is desirable both from the standpoint of sales appeal and cost and which has not previously been achieved in workable vending machines for a plurality of types of mechandise.

The machine can be serviced rapidly and simply. Both reloading and maintenance operations can be performed by relatively unskilled personnel; pertinent complications of earlier machines of this class being avoided. The display of goods for sale, in this new machine,

resembles that in some of the self-service stores de- Fig. l is a diagrammatic front view of. a vending machine in accordance herewith. Figure 2 is a side view of the machine, with a side panel removed. Figures 3 and 4 are sections along lines 33 of Fig. 2 44 of Fig. 1 respectively.

Fig. 5 is a view on a larger scale, taken along lines 5-5, of Fig. 1. Figures 5A and 6 are views taken along the respective lines in Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a bottom view of Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is a view on approximately the same scale as in Fig. 5, taken along lines S8 of Fig. 1. Figs. 9, 10 are views taken along lines 99 and 10-10 in Figs. 8 and 9, respectively. 7

Figs. 11 and 12 are views taken along lines 11-11 and 1212, respectively, in Fig. 8. Fig. 13 is a modification of Fig. 6.

Fig. 14 is a wiring diagram for the electrical system forming part of the machine.

In this machine there are vended a variety of types of merchandise, either packaged or not, having different outer dimensions, weight, hardness, etc. An item of one type is diagrammatically indicated by the circle M-l; it may consist for instance in a flat cylindrical container,

and

displayed with a flat side facing thefront. An item of 1 2,777,603 Patented Jan. 15, 1957 another type is similarly indicated by the square M-Z; this may consist for instance in a deeper cylindrical container, displayed with part of the cylindrical side facing the front. Obviously, it is desirable to vend an endless variety of containers, bottles, boxes, articles, etc.; and while no more than two items M-1 and M2 are specifically illustrated, the present machine has almost unlimited possibilities in this respect.

When the machine is loaded with mechandise it receives a number of items of each type M-1, M-2 etc., forming a row R-l, R-Z etc. These rows of merchandise items are supported on superposed shelves 10-A, ill-B etc. Each row extends from the back to the front of the machine, displaying mainly the front item. The vending mechanism is so arranged that the specific item of merchandise, vended in each successive, automatic vending operation, is identical with the item in full display; not only represented thereby. This feature, together with the variety of items on display, adds greatly to the sales appeal of the machine.

The basic principle of operation, in this machine, provides that the purchaser first selects the desired row R-l, R-2 etc. by operating a device such as a handwheel 11 to move a vertical row indicator and motor standard 12 to the proper position. He must then insert the proper coin or coins in a coin slot 13. Next he can press one of several superposed push-buttons 14-A, 14-B etc.,-corresponding in position and number to the shelf .10-A, Ill-B selected. The so-selected item of merchandise is promptly discharged from its magazine row by a mechanism which responds to the dropping of the coin; this mechanism comprising linkage actuated by one of several superposed motors 15A, 15B etc. on the motor standard 12. The discharged merchandise item falls, in front of the purchaser, into a suitable trough 16 at the bottom of the machine, from which it is picked up manually.

' In order to allow this simple form of a vending process,

the shelves 10A, 10B etc. are combined into a rigid frame 17 (Fig. 5), inserted in a cabinet 18 which has in front a window 19, substantially as wide and high as is the set of shelves (Fig. l). The display obtained in this manner is more direct than that connected with the ususal vertical-chute vending machine. Further, this display is considerably more varied than the usual one of chute type machines and the like; the flat shelves can be loaded with a great variety of types of merchandise, without much regard for dimensions and proportions. The difierent types can rather be arranged according to price levels; for instance ten cent items on the lowest shelf; twenty-five cent items on the next; thirty-five cent items on the next; etc. This manner of display resembles that of successful self-service stores. The idea had occurred to me that a miniature store of this kind, with automatic vending provisions, should be particularly efiicient in operation. I found this true, and found it further possible to make it economical in both manufacture and service; more so than any combination of chute type machines and the like. I also found it possible to avoid all difiiculties arising from the storage or discharge of merchandise items of different size and shape. Such ditficulties existed and were known for a long time.

I form each shelf 10A etc. with a series of magazine channels 20A, 2013 etc.; generally using one channel for each row R-l, R-Z of merchandise, although specially wide items of merchandise may cover more than one channel. These channels, asbest shown in Figs. 4 and 5, run the entire distance from the front to the back of the shelf. Thereby they allow the use, in each channel, of an endless conveyor band 21, with an operating run directly below the shelf, a parallel return run further for the actuator rod bearings 29 and further supports for the transverse shafts 24, 25.

I have found it particularly desirable to shape the lugs 22 and their guide and attachment clips 39 in the preferred manner shown in Figs. 8 and 11. Each clip 39 of this form substantially consists in a metal strip at least somewhat wider than the conveyor band 21, and having four definite portions as follows: (1) an upright, normally upstanding portion forming the lug 22 for attachment of the merchandise cage or holder 38; (2) a fiat, short, normally more or less-horizontal portion 22A, having a top surface in contact with the undersides 40 of the shelf plates A, 10B; (3) another flat, shortnor-v mally more or less horizontal portion 22B connected to 22A by a vertical component 22C, disposed slightly below 22A, and secured to the band 21, as by rivets 22E; the band 21 being in contact with and'supported by the surface 41; and (4) an upright, normally depending portion forming the service lug 34 and connected to the back edge of the portion 22B. The portions 22A, 22B are slightly wider than the band 21. The upstanding lug 22 is preferably disposed centrally of the portion 22A, the depending lug 34 laterally of the portion 223. It will thus be seen (Fig. 8) that each clip 39 has substantially a zigzagshaped form, in side view, comprising three vertical components 22, 22C, 34 and two horizontal components 22A, 22B.

I have further found it very desirable to support the underside of the higher portion 22A from the band 21 in order to prevent it safely from distortion; for instance by rivets 22D secured to the band below such platform, and similar to the rivets 22E. This will be understood more clearly when it is considered that the channel 20 desirably has a height at least slightly greater than the thickness of the clip-attaching portion 22B, in order to avoid mechanical binding even in the event that the shelves are slightly bent by the variable load of merchandise thereon, or that some dust or dirt has been.

deposited in the channels.

. It will further be seen that the conveyor band 21 of each row has approximately one-half of its total length (the equivalent of the length of a channel 20) connected with article-holding clips 39. When the machine is newly loaded with merchandise all these clips and their article containers 38 and items of merchandise therein are on top of the shelves. When the machine is empty, all but the last of the clips 39, with empty containers .38, are below the shelves. For reloading with merchandise they are manually retracted; the operating mechanism will not interfere, by virtue of the guards 37 as described.

The vending process consists in moving the operating run of a proper conveyor 21 to the front of the machine, by a proper distance controlled by the guard 37, and simultaneously removing the preceding, empty article holder 38 and lug 22 from the cabinet space in front of the shelves 10 to allow free falling of the newly vended merchandise item; and in suitably controlling these several motions etc. as will be described hereinafter. During the mechanical motion of the conveyor and attached parts, the previous holders 22, 38 are being swung around the front roller 23, in vertical planes, while the new item of merchandise, in the next container 38, is still being supported at least in part by the shelf plates 10A, 10B. As the new item reaches the front position shown in Figure 8, it loses the support of the shelf plates and falls.

I greatly prefer the shelves 19A, etc. to be installed with a pronounced backward slope. This results in a forward slope of the lug 22 and back wall 38A of the article container. Such forward slope, when sufliciently pronounced, causes the items to slide out and consequently to fall in a direction containing a forward component sufficient to counteract interception of falling items by lower shelves 113 and hoppers 38.

It might seem that such a forward slope can be provided also without a backward slope of the shelves; however, closer consideration shows a special advantage of the construction as shown and described. In this connection reference is made to Figure 8, which shows the front item of merchandise in process of falling. It must be kept in mind that in the present machine, the merchandise may have various forms, side and bottom configurations, frictional characteristics, etc. It must further be kept in mind that the shelf plate 10 stops, and practically must stop, somewhere above the front rollers 23; preferablyabove their front portions. Consideration of Figure 8 will show that due to the backward slope of the tray and forward slope of the lug 22, practically all types of merchandise which can be handled by the conveyor at all will be in sliding contact with and subject to sliding support by the lug 22 and attached container back wall 38A at the precise instant of discharge. If Figure 8 be changed, for instance by making the shelf and conveyor strictly horizontal while leaving other features unchanged, it would be unpredictable whether a given item of merchandise, at said instant, leans against the front of the back wall of the container 38it being necessary for obvious reasons to allow some little looseness in said container. This indefiniteness of position and support would lead to the possibility, at least for a great many typical forms of items, that wedging instead of free discharge occurs at the critical moment.

In some cases the discharge of articles from the universal merchandise conveyors can be made still safer, and the conveyor construction still simpler, by omitting the holders 38 entirely or partly, while retaining the other features as described, which insure proper display, propelling and discharge. When omitting part of the holders 38, it may still be desirable to retain their side walls 38 B. However, it also is possible to hold the articles only by the movable lugs 22 and/ or added stationary, lateral, vertical walls 44 extending between the channels (see Figure l3). Lateral tilting of merchandise is then prevented by walls 44 instead of clips 38B.

In order to cause the vending and discharging process described, the purchaser as mentioned operates a handwheel, coin device and push button, before picking up the article from the trough at the bottom of the machine. Details of this handwheel, coin device etc. will now be described.

The handwheel 11 is preferably located at a convenient elevation above the floor, and at one side of the cabinet as shown. It rotates a shaft 45 (Figs. 2, 3), which extends horizontally adjacent to and parallel with a sidewall 46 of the cabinet 18. Within the cabinet, adjacent the back wall 47, a pair of sprockets 48, 49 are mounted on the shaft 45. Each sprocket operates a chain, one chain (50) extending to the top and another (51) extending to the bottom of the cabinet. Each of these chains engages a further sprocket, in the top part (52) and in the bottom part (53) respectively; each of the latter sprockets 52, 53 being interconnected by a horizontal chain 54, 55, with an upper or lower countersprocket 56, 57 adjacent the other sidewall 58. All sprockets may be of the same size, thereby insuring uniform horizontal motions of the upper and lower chains 54, 55.

These chains are vertically interconnected by, and used for the lateral motion of, the motor standard 12, which is supported and guided at least at one end by suitable means such as a small carriage 59. Clockwise rotation of the handwheel moves the motor standard to the left; counterclockwise rotation returns it to the right. The position of the motor standard is clearly indicated to the purchaser by an index finger 60 secured to the top of the standard, reaching over the set of shelves, and depending in front of the machine, as best shown in Fig. 4. This index finger and the standard carrying it will register, at any one operative position thereof, with an ena ing motor A or 153 etc. is prepared.

' may be indicated by the lighting up of a signal lamp 9t},

, 7 fire' set of merchandiserows R*"1or'R-2 etc'.; these-rows being accurately superposed above one anotlier'fon-this purpose.

Irtorder to insure positioning of the standard and index in proper operative positions, the shaft carries a' mechanical and electrical indexing device 61' (Fig. 14). This device comprises a first cam 62, in form of-a'n'otched circular disc. Two notches 63, at 180 degrees from one another, are shown. They can be engaged or disengaged by a locking bar or latch 64, actuated for engagement withthe cam by a solenoid 65. The second cam 66 of the indexing device has two low lobes 67 at locations angularly aligned with the notches 63, to operate a cam follower roller 68 for the control of a single throw switch 69. The peripheral spacing between the notches 63 and low lobes 67 coincides with the lateral spacing between channels 20 on the shelves 10, so that the latch 64 and switch 69 can be operated only when the motor standard 12' is in operative position behind such a channel. That such a position has been reached can be noted by observation of the index finger an and-also by a slight clicking noise which occurs when the roller-'68 falls into the low lobe 67. At such points, and only there, the switch 69 closes a slug reiecto'r circuit 70 through a slug reiector' 71 having a rejector relay coil 70A or the like, as is well known to the art.

When a coin is then inserted in the slot 13 and allowed to fall through the chute 72 of the slug rejector (see Fig. 2), one or several of the usual doublethrow coin switches 73, 74, 75'are momentarily deflected from their normal position, shown in Fig. 14, to a position wherein they break the slug reiector circuit and close a momentary stepper circuit for instance circuit 76 or 77, through a solenoid 78, 79 or 80 of a conventional totalizer, 81. These solenoids, when so energized, raise a lever 82, by'diiferent numbers of degrees respectively, thereby producing different amounts of rotation of a pawl and ratchet mechanism 83 and of a tctalizer contactor 84 coupled therewith. Depending on' the total rotation obtained, the contactor stops at some point of the periphery of a stationary disk $5, and establishes contact with one of several contacts 86 thereon. The lever 82 and contactor 34 are then held in each position so established, by a spring-loaded latch 87 engaginga notch 87A, against the pressure'of a torsion spring 38 tending to return the contactor to its normal or zero position. As the contactor establishes and holds Contact with one of the contacts 86 a starter circuit 89 through a correspond- (This preparation corresponding in position with the proper shelf 16A, .188 etc. The lamp circuit is shown at 91.) The deflection of a coin switch, the operation and latching-in of the totalizer mechanism, and the preparation of the corresponding starter circuit follow practically in an ins'te'nt'upon the dropping of the coin.

Thereupon the purchaser can complete the proper starting circuit 89 by pressing a push button 14A adjacent the lighted lamp 90, unless he prefers on final thought to change the plan and produce, by conventional means not shown, a return of his coin and return of the electrical system to its normal and original position. it should be understood that various refinements of this last-mentioned kind are known to the art; also for purposes such as temporary retention of coins, automatic coin changing and the like. The pressing of the push button l-tA temporarily reverses the pertinent double throw switch 92, and thereby completes the starting circuit previously prepared, starting the selected motor LlSA, 153 etc. As soon as such 'a motor starts running, its reducer output shaft 93 begins to rotate a cam and crank unit 94L This unit (Fig. 10) has a crank pin 95, rotating in'the plane of the pertinent shelf 10, which pin now begins to engage a slot 96 extending transversely of the pertiiii) neat Chennai-20, ina oke 97. This oke is guided for reciprocation in a direction parallel with the channel 20, bystr ips 98 securedto the motor-reducer base. The-yoke is adaptedto engage the-back end of the pusher rod 28, and does so when it has been moved forward by a rsufficient distance, depending on the aforem'e'ntionedadjust ment of the actual stroke. Every full revolutionof the pin and reciprocation of the yoke 97 may occupy for instance a few seconds; it begins with a'forw'ard stroke and endswith the return stroke to the original position. Desirably the forward stroke of the yoke is slightly longer than the total stroke of the pusher'rod, in order to insure the absence of jammingon pusher rods utilizing the entire stroke length. In this manner, undue starting loads areav'oided.

Each unit 94 also has a cam 99 adapted. to control a double-throw snap-action switch 100. In normal position this switch closes the aforementioned starting.circuit.89 for the motor 15. Promptly upon the start of rotation of the motor and cam 99, and practically over the entire remaining part of the periphery of this cam, the switch 100 is and remains reversed, to close an operating circuit 101- for the motor 15. From the moment when this circuit 101 has been established the push button 14 :can safely be released. Only a split second isv required for the change from the starting to the operating circuit, and the normal period of push button depression extends well beyond this interval. Exceptionally, if a push button be merely touched in passing rather than normally depressed, the motor 15' may stop before the switch 100 hasbeen reversed; however, this is readily corrected by pushing the push button again and more properly.

When an entire revolution of the pin 95 has been completed the .cam 99 opens the operating circuit 101 by reversing the switch 100. again. At that time no starting circuit remains, regardless of possible intervening operations either intentional or faulty. Even the dropping of additional coins, pushing of push buttons, or attempted turning of the handwheel will not interfere. This is achieved'mainly by a double throw switch 102 in a relay 103, energized by a switch 104 in the totalizer. The switch 104 is open when, and only when, the contactor 84 is in its normalzero position. The turning of the contactor to any one contact 86 has closed the switch 104, thereby energizing the relay 103, which has reversed the relay switch 102 from its normally closed position 102-A to its normally open position 102-13. In said position 10243 the switch 102 has allowed the establishment of the'aforementioned operating circuit 101. It has also estabhshed a parallel circuit 101S, including the aforementioned solenoid 65. This has locked the cam 62 and motor standard 12, insuring undisturbed completion of the vending operation even in the event of accidental interference with the handwhcel 11. The opening of switch 102 imposition 102-A has broken the slug rejector circuit 70, although that circuit remains closed at 69.

Due to the opening of both the starting and operatin motor circuits 89, 101, the previously energized motor 15 now stops, at the point where its yoke and push rod have completed a forward and reverse stroke.

Shortly before this time, when the forward stroke was completed, the purchaser could see the selected item of merchandise fall into the trough-16. He should now open the trough to remove the merchandise. Premature opening of the trough and initiation of dependent. actions can be avoided by a conventional, automatic lockingarrangement (not shown). 0 7

By the time the purchaser can have opened the trough pursuant to the fall of the merchandise, the motor cycle is complete. The opening of the trough momentarily closes a normally open switch 105, completing a reset circuit 106 (through the switch 104 which is still closed due to the latching-in of the totaliz'er) and thereby momentarily'energizing a'reset or'latch-out solenoid'107 in the totalizer. This unlocks'the lever 82, pawl and ratchet mechanism 83 and contactor 84 and allows the spring 88 to return the contactor to its normal zero position. This in turn opens the switch 104, terminating the reset circuit even if the trough remains open for some more moments. (This trough can be counterweighted for automatic closing by well-known means not shown.) The opening of the switch 104 also deenergizes the relay 103, thereby reversing the switch 192 to position 102-A (to prepare for or make a new slug rejector circuit 70) and removing it from position 102-13 (to make sure that the proper sequence of starting and operating motor circuits ensue again, pursuant to the next coin insertion; and also to unlock the handwheel shaft and motor standard).

It will be seen that the described conveyor mechanism is actuated only pursuant to proper selection by vertical selector means (11, 45, 48, 49. 59, 60) and horizontal selector means (13,71, 81, 100), by separate actuator means (14) to start the automatic vending operation and (16, 105) to complete it. The inherent sales appeal of the machine is basically insured by the possibility of making said proper and definite selection, involving the actual item of merchandise to be delivered, and of manually actuating the vending operation when the definite selection has been made; not before.

This sales appeal is further enhanced by the foolproof operation of the machine; mainly by the feature that the transaction, once definitely started, is undisturbedly completed even in case of attempted interference. The locking features (61, 103) are particularly useful in this connection.

A number of modifications will occur to persons skilled in this art upon a study of this disclosure. Underlying features of the invention are claimed to the extent defined as follows.

I claim:

1. A vending machine for miscellaneous articles, comprising a set of spaced superposed shelves; a plurality of spaced, juxtaposed channels in each shelf; conveyors in such channels; a plurality of article holders spaced along and secured to each of said conveyors, such holders extending from the upper run of the conveyor upwardly through and from the respective channel, spacing the articles which rest and slide on the respective shelf, by at least one half the front roller circumference of each conveyor and holding such articles against tilting; an actuator lug secured to each article holder, extending downwardly through and from the respective channel; an actuator rod extending adjacent to and parallel with each of said conveyors, adapted to be reciprocated along the conveyor over predetermined distances greater than said respective spacing of articles, and adapted when moved in one direction to contact an actuator lug and to impel it and the parts secured thereto by a distance substantially equal said respective spacing; and motor control means so to reciprocate a selected actuator rod and thereby to discharge a selected, displayed article from its channel.

2. A vending machine as described in claim 1, wherein each article holder and actuator lug is formed by a onepiece clip having a portion extending along the conveyor.

3. A vending machine as described in claim 2, wherein each article holder has attached thereto, beyond the channel, an article container open at the top and bottom.

4. A vending machine as described in claim 3, wherein each article container is at least partly open in front.

5. A vending machine as described in claim 1, additionally comprising stationary partition Walls extending upwards from and secured to the shelves, to prevent articles from falling or tipping laterally.

6. A vending machine for miscellaneous articles, comprising a set of spaced superposed shelves; a vertical window spaced from and substantially coextensive with the set of shelves; article receiver means below the space between the Window and the set of shelves; a plurality of spaced, juxtaposed channels in each shelf; conveyors in such channels; a plurality of article holders spaced'along and secured to each of said conveyors, such holders extending from the upper run of the conveyor upwardly through and from the respective channel, displaying at least front portions of the foremost article on each conveyor, behind said window, and holding the articles which rest and slide on the-shelves, spaced by at least one half the front roller circumference of each conveyor; an actuator lug secured to each article holder, extending downwardly through and from the respective channel; an actuator rod extending adjacent to and parallel with each of said conveyors, adapted to be reciprocated along the conveyor over predetermined distances greater than said respective spacing of articles, and adapted when moved toward the window to contact an actuator lug and to impel it and the parts secured thereto by a distance substantially equal said respective spacing; and motor control means so to reciprocate a selected actuator rod and thereby to dischargea selected, displayed article into the article receiver means.

7. A vending machine according to claim 6, wherein the motor control means comprises coin receiver means, shelf selector means, channel selector means, and electric interlock means so arranged that vending of any articles requires removal of any previously vended article from the article receiver means and subsequent operation of the coin receiver and selector means.

8. A vending machine according to claim 7, comprising means to lock the selector means upon insertion of a coin in the coin receiver means, and means to unlock the selector means upon removal of a vended article from the article receiver means.

9. A vending machine for miscellaneous articles, comprising a cabinet; a window in the front of and coextensive with a major part of the front of the cabinet; a set of spaced superposed shelves sloping slightly in the direction away from the window, the set being substantially coextensive with the window; article receiver means below the space between the window and the set of shelves; a plurality of spaced, juxtaposed channels extending in and parallel with each shelf toward the window; conveyors extending in and parallel with such channels; a plurality of article holders spaced along and secured to each of said conveyors, such holders extending from the upper run of the conveyor upwardly through and from the respective channel, displaying at least front portions of the foremost and uppermost article on each conveyor, behind said window, and holding the articles which rest and slide on the shelves, spaced by at least one half front roller circumference of each conveyor; an actuator lug secured to each article holder, extending downwardly through and from the respective channel; an actuator rod extending adjacent to and parallel with each of said conveyors, adapted to be reciprocated along the conveyor over predetermined distances greater than said respective spacing of articles, and adapted when moved toward the window to contact an actuator lug and to impel it and the parts secured thereto along and parallel with the shelf, by distances substantially equal said respective spacing; and motor control means so to reciprocate a selected actuator rod and thereby to downwardly and slightly forwardly discharge a selected displayed article, for interception in the receiver means.

10. A vending machine according to claim 9, wherein each shelf comprises a series of separate plates and means, comprising shafts for the conveyor rollers, to hold such plates together as a shelf.

11. A vending machine according to claim 10, additionally comprising an elongated, rigid channel element extending along each channel and secured to the shelf at and below each channel; the shafts being held by said channel elements.

12. A vending machine according to claim 11, additionally comprising slide bearing means for the actuator rods, spaced along and secured to said channel elements.

13. A vending machine for miscellaneous articles, com- 11 prisingiaset. ofyspaced superposed shelves; a plurality of spaced, juxtaposed channels in each shelf; conveyors in such. channelsya plurality of article holders spaced along and-secured to each of said conveyors, such holders extending from the. upper run of the conveyor upwardly through and from the respective channel; an actuator lug secured to each article holder, extending downwardly through and fromthe respective channel; an actuator rod extending adjacent toand parallel with each of said conveyors, adapted to be reciprocated along the conveyor over predetermined distances greater than said respective spa-o ing of articles, and adapted when moved in one direction to contact an actuator lug and to impel it and the parts secured thereto by a distance substantially equal said respective spacing; a standard substantially as high as the motor means comprises atleast one motorized reducer; a disc on the output shaft of the reducer; acam surface peripherally formed on the disc; a cam switch associated with the cam surface and forming part of the means to control the motor means; a pin extending from the disc in a direction parallel with the output shaft; and a yoke adapted to reciprocate transversely of said direction, having an elongated, transverse slot associated with the pin, and being adapted to reciprocate actuator rods.

15. A vending machine according to claim 1-3, wherein the motor m ans comprises one of said motorized reducers, discs, cam switches and yokes for each shelf; such reducers being mounted on a vertical standard, and the standard being adapted to be reciprocated behind and along the set of shelves.

References Cited in the'file 'of this'patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 919,324 Chisholm Apr. 27, 1909* 1,181,590 Gresham May 2, 1916 2,253,447 Stanford Aug. 19, 1941 2,290,275 Childers July 21, 1942 2,354,896 Weiler Aug. 1, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US919824 *Oct 29, 1908Apr 27, 1909Thomas R ChisolmCoin-controlled vending apparatus.
US1181590 *Jun 23, 1915May 2, 1916Lucious C GreshamCombination peanut and popcorn vending machine.
US2253447 *Sep 26, 1939Aug 19, 1941J I GibsonVending machine
US2290275 *Sep 22, 1939Jul 21, 1942Childers Harry SBottle vending machine
US2354896 *Oct 28, 1939Aug 1, 1944Weiler Edward GroverCoin controlled vending apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3113656 *Sep 30, 1960Dec 10, 1963Micro Products IncSnack vendor
US3125244 *Jun 6, 1960Mar 17, 1964 Vending machine
US3185279 *Sep 6, 1963May 25, 1965Spears Willard BVending machine
US3219234 *Mar 6, 1961Nov 23, 1965Standard Packaging CorpAutomatic vending machine for greeting cards and the like
US3269595 *Oct 2, 1964Aug 30, 1966Merrill KrakauerArticle vending machine
US3344953 *Feb 18, 1965Oct 3, 1967Merrill KrakauerArticle vending machine having helical feeder coil
US4269325 *May 23, 1979May 26, 1981Polyvend, Inc.Can vending apparatus
US4278182 *Sep 7, 1979Jul 14, 1981Ahlstroem AVending machine
US4598810 *Apr 17, 1984Jul 8, 1986Abm Industries, Inc.Apparatus and method for vending and accepting return of re-usable articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification221/84, 221/258, 221/126, 221/155, 221/5, 221/129, 194/223, 221/247
International ClassificationG07F5/18
Cooperative ClassificationG07F11/002, G07F5/18
European ClassificationG07F11/00B, G07F5/18