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Publication numberUS2777677 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1957
Filing dateOct 6, 1954
Priority dateOct 6, 1954
Publication numberUS 2777677 A, US 2777677A, US-A-2777677, US2777677 A, US2777677A
InventorsWilliam Bunch
Original AssigneeWilliam Bunch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air tempering equipment
US 2777677 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1957 w, BUNCH 2,777,677

AIR TEMPERING EQUIPMENT Filed on. e, 1954 I N VEN TOR.

WILLIAM BUNCH United States Paten 2,777,677 AIR 'I'EMPERING EQUIPMENT William Bunch, Grand Prairie, Tex. Application October 6, 1954, Serial no. 460,579 Claims. (Cl. 261

This invention relates to air conditioning and air tempering equipment and more particularly to a selfcontained unit that will be compact and easy to handle and transport. It has among its objects to provide a new and improved air tempering unit that will avoid, one or more of the disadvantages and limitations of the prior art. Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved air tempering unit, that will be arranged for cooling air to be dispersed in a room or chamber, Without the use of conventional refrigerating equipment normally essential in apparatus of this nature.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved airtempering unit employing evaporative cooling principles. An additional object of the invention is to provide a new and improved air tempering unit that will not only cool the air that is dispersed by it, but will have control of the moisture content therein. I w v Still another object of this invention isto provide a new and improved air tempering unit that will be simple in construction, economical to man'u'fa'cture and maintain, andefiective in operation, as well as afford a filtering arrangement in its structure to remove dust and objectional matter, as the air, is passed through the device and before it is distributed thereby. I

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the invention is more fully set forth. The provision of a unit or system for the conditioning of air in a room or public space, has become an important adjunct in modern civilization. However the cost of an installation for this purpose and its operation is high, too much to appeal to families of moderate means.

This invention is intended to meet the conditions and resulting demand for a reasonably priced installation, having a low maintenance and operating cost. It is feasible to make the system in small or moderate sized units and include automatic features as additional conveniences. M M p The partial vacuuminduced by the exhaust pump, in conjunction with a suitable regulating valve is employed to give a balancing effect in the cooling results. This arrangement avoids the apparatus required in a conventional refrigerated system and its expensive sundries. The recirculating coil employed in this invention is an advantageous feature in that it stretches the temperature limits over a considerable range. This unit can be utilized in cold and warm climates. This invention em phasizes in its operation: (1) a vacuum eifect on the treated air; (2) control of the amount and pressure of the entering air by a regulating valve; (3) a heat interchanger coil for varying the cooling action; (4) and a humidity control for the dispersed air and (5) a panel for creating a bubbling system of streams through water, evenly and fully distributed for producing a humidifying, cooling and. moisture saturation effect; (6) a comparatively noiseless action.

For a better understanding of the invention and the objects thereof, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form ofthe invention: is indicated. These drawings in conjunction with the following description, illustrate the invention; explain its principles and explain its method of operation.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a sectional elevation taken longitudinally throughan air tempering unit on line 1-1 of Figure 2, together with its connections, and embodying this invention;

Figure 2 is a" transverse sectional elevation taken" on line 2--2 of Figure 1'; and

Figure 3 is a View in perspective of the filtering and air distributing panel used in this embodiment.

Similar reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the drawings: v M

In the construction shown in the drawings, a cabinet 10' of formal rectangular contour and suitable material, thickness, and strength is" provided to contain the various items that make up the equipment of an air tempering unit. The interior of the cabinet includes an air ing and coil section" 12, perforated baffles and drip plates 21 and 22, and an upper secondary. chamber 14, for holding the tempered airready for disp'rs'al.'

The chamber 11 is separated and partitioned on from the section; 12 by a relatively thin perforated anel 15. Its perforations 16 are evenly distributed over the panel 15, and are made very minute. I The perforations are small eaougnto avoid leakage (because of surface tension) of appreciable quantities of water resting on the panel 15. The chamber is fed with air under pressure through a piping inlet connection 17 and after accumulating in the chamberapassels it in' fine needle-size streams through the holes 16, into the water section 1 2'. The air continues through the water 18 and fills the space 20 above the latter. 4 Then a suction or vacuum device, pump or exhaus'tfan 1 9 rriounted on outer top rf 'l of the c bi et a a d q de la pe t a vacuum in the sp'aceQll induces the air to flow out f h a e t n id ab e t fii i up h heat to reduce its temperature a cor'isiderable number of degrees. As the airleaves the space, it passes w n a s o bfliam ri pl ll W 2 .11 lower baflie 22 has perforations 23 to allow any egicelss water. condensing outpfthe air, to accumulate on ita'nd drip back into the water 18 below. The device 19 is driven r m tor 0 The baffle plates are placed relatively close to cine atiother and serve to squeeze or comprejss the air stream as itpasses to the upper chamber 1 4 for the tempered air. From the upper chamber 14 the air passes through main outlet piping connection 24 to the. suction devige. pump or exhaust fan 19 and is discharged intothe piping 25 The piping carries the air to a diversion valve 2 6 of the three way type. The valve 25 canbeoperated to send the air into mann r 27 from a pipeline 28 connected to it. At the outlet, the air is distributed i nto a room (not shown) intended to be supplied by it and cooled; If the valve 26 is operated in another direction it diverts the air through the piping connection 29 at the water pool in section '12. The air continues through into a tubular copper coil 30 which is cooled further by the water 18; already cooled by the evaporative action of the air passing through it under pressure and ,vacuum. Leaving the tubular coil 39 throughtheconnectign 3'1, it ente'rsinto the piping SZ andflows to ar outlet 33in ano h r s l te rq m; sn tah il atasla a b v er :e. qe taest qas th93 l sW RiR H 3.5 h water section to a predetermined level, and can be drained through the piping;35. l Ahfloat and valve mechanism 36 of conyentionaltype keep the water at the proper level.

In order to keep the pressure of the :air flowing into the air distributing chamber at the proper amount, a suitable regulating "valve 37 i's insertedinatheservice line 38% and 1; controls :the new of airf'through the-unit. 'There are' ceritain adjustments made and rendered practical by thebalpered air through the coil and to the exterior atmos- 'iancing of the suctionorvaeuumdevicei19 'against'ione another, in conjunction with the-conditions imposed by the Water, panel, baffles and piping;-* Wnen the proper balance is acquired the unitltempers the air :pas'sing through and provides the necessaryitemperature and hue-midityi desired GIJ-S1CId before the-air is distributed at 'theoutlets' Various channelsgsuch as radiators and the like can be utilized for the delivery of the temperedtair ifiOm "ther-deviceic The term --.partition is usable in this specification to include in itsmeaning the drip plates'or inbaffies zlh'anddlk as-well as the panel 16, employing it in a generic way. v a v V lfhe-arrows used on the drawing .enable the observer to follow the path of the air through the system;

While butone formof the-invention is indicated in thisapplication it is not desired to-limit this application tifor Letters-Patent to such form, as it is appreciated that other forms and constructions could be designed and used that would use the same principles andcome within the scope of the appended claims. I a

1. An airtempering unit comprising in combination, a cabinet, minutely perforated panel disposed across saidcabinet dividing it into an air distributing chamber 'and a secondary chamber; baffles staggered across said secondary chamber for diverting air drawn from said first mentioned chamber throughthe perforations in said panel into said secondary chamber, said panel being adapted to support a quantity of water thereon without it appreciably leaking through said perforations but allowing air under pressure to pass upwardly through the panel and water and be humidified thereby and temperedlby evaporation before continuing by the battles; a main inlet for supplying air to the distributing chamber, a main outlet for the outflow of the tempered and humidified air, and a device for inducing the air to fiow through the chambers fromthe main inlet to the main outletflunder pressure, with the addition of a. tubular coil.disposed in the'secondary chamber to be immersed by said Water,

connections between the said outlet and said coilfor transmitting the tempered airtherethrough and an additional outlet for exteriorly dispersing the air after it passes through the coil. L v

2. An air tempering unit comprising in combination,

a cabinet, a minutely perforated panel disposed across said cabinet dividing it into an air distributing chamber and a secondary chamber; bafiies staggered across said secondary chamber for diverting air drawn from said first mentioned chamber through the perforations in said panel into said secondary chamber, said panel being adapted to support a quantity of water thereon without it appreciably leaking through said perforations but allowing air under pressure to pass upwardly through the panel and water and be humidified thereby and tempered by evaporation before continuing by the bafiles; a main inlet for supplying air to the distributing chamber, a main outlet for the outflow of the tempered and humidified air, and a device for inducing the air to flow through the chambers from the main inlet to the Having thus described the invention what is claimed a phere. v

3. An air tempering unit comprising in combination a cabinet, 2. minutely perforated panel disposed across said cabinet dividing it into an air distributing chamber and a secondary chamber; baflles staggered across said secondary chamber for diverting air drawn from said first mentioned chamber. through the perforations in said panel into said secondary chamber, said panel being adapted tov support aquantityuof water thereon without it appreciably leaking through said perforations but allowing air under pressure to pass upwardly through the paneland water and be humidified therebyand; tempered by evaporation before continuing by the baflles; a main inlet for supplying air to the distributing chamber, a main outlet for the outflow of the tempered and humidified air, and a device for inducing the air to flow through the chambers from the main inlet to the main outlet under pressure, with the addition of a tubular coil disposed in the secondary chamber to be immersed by said water, connections between the said outlet and said coil for transmitting the tempered air therethrough and an additional outlet for exteriorly dispersing the air after it passes through the coil with the addition of a valve for selectively controlling the passage of the tempered air through the coil and to the exterior atmosphere with the addition of meansfor supplying and draining the water in the secondary chamberand means for automatically controlling the supplying means" .1

4. An air tempering unit comprising in combination a cabinet, a minutely perforated panel disposed across said cabinet dividing it intoan air distributing chamber and a secondary chamber; bafiles staggered across said secondary chamber forv diverting air drawn from said first mentioned chamber through the perforations in said panel into secondary chamber, said panel being adapted to support a quantity of water thereon without it appreciably leaking through said perforations but allowing air under pressure to pass upwardly through the panel and water and be humidified thereby and tempered by evaporation before continuing by thebaffles; a main inlet for supplying air to the distributing chamber, a main outlet for the outflow of the tempered and humidified air, and a device for inducing the air to flow through the chambers from the main inlet tothe main outlet under pressure, with the addition of a tubular coil disposed in the secondary chamber to be immersed by said water, connections between the said outlet and said coil foriransmitting the tempered air therethrough and an additional outlet for exteriorly dispersing the air after it passes through the coil with the addition of a valve, for selectively controlling the passage of the tempered air through thecoil and to the exterior atmosphere with the addition of means for supplying and draining the water in the secondary chamber and means for automatically controlling the supplying means with the device for inducing the air floW including a vacuumatic mechanism adjacent the main outlet and connected therewith to produce a suction within the cabinet to draw air from the main inlet through the distributing chamber, the perforations in the panel, through the water into the space above in the secondary chamber, against the baflies to remove excess particles of water and collect and drain .them back into the water, and thence to the main outlet.

5. An air tempering unit comprising in combination a cabinet, a minutely perforated panel disposed across said cabinet dividing it into an air distributing chamber and a secondary chamber; bafiles staggered across said secondary chamber for diverting air drawn from said first mentioned chamber through the perforations in said panel into secondary chamber, said panel being adapted to support a quantity of Waterthereon without it appreciably leaking through said perforations but allowing air under pressure to pass upwardly through the paneland water and be humidified thereby and tempered by evapo- 5 ration before continuing by the baffles; a main inlet for supplying air to the distributing chamber, a main outlet for the outflow of the tempered and humidified air, and a device for inducing the air to flow through the chambers from the main inlet to the main outlet under pressure, with the addition of a tubular coil disposed in the secondary chamber to be mimersed by said water, connections between the said outlet and said coil for transmitting the tempered air therethrough and an additional outlet for exteriorly dispersing the air after it passes through the coil with the addition of a valve for selectively controlling the passage of the tempered air through the coil and to the exterior atmosphere with the addition of means for supplying and draining the water in the secondary chamber and means for automatically controlling the supplying means with the device for inducing the air flow including a vacuumatic mechanism adjacent the main outlet and connected therewith to produce a suction within the cabinet to draw air from the main inlet through the distributing chamber, the perforations in the panel, through the water into the space above in the secondary chamber, against the bafiies to remove excess particles of water and collect and drain them back into the water, and thence to the main outlet with the said bafiies being horizontally positioned and including holes therethrough to facilitate the draining of the water particles collecting thereon, and the main inlet being disposed centrally in the bottom Wall of the cabinet and the main outlet in the top Wall of the cabinet ofiset to create a longer path between the bafiles for the air flow whereby the flow of air therein will be zigzagged vertica'lly upward.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,014,893 Moeller Jan. 16, 1912 1,575,292 Tyler Mar. 2, 1926 1,723,810 Ryan Aug. 6, 1929 1,954,949 Roe Apr. 17, 1934 1,968,698 Meyer July 31, 1934 1,982,305 Hunicke Nov. 27, 1934 FOREIGN PATENTS 25,866 Great Britain Oct. 14, 1899

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1014893 *Aug 5, 1911Jan 16, 1912Henry MoellerCooling device.
US1575292 *Apr 30, 1925Mar 2, 1926Daniel C TylerAir washer
US1723810 *Apr 21, 1927Aug 6, 1929Sigismund Ryan JohnCool chest or chamber
US1954949 *Oct 26, 1932Apr 17, 1934Ralph C RocAir cooling and air conditioning device
US1968698 *Aug 25, 1933Jul 31, 1934Meyer William AFuel vaporizer
US1982305 *Sep 26, 1932Nov 27, 1934Clarence C HunickeAir conditioning system
GB189925866A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2937506 *Feb 7, 1956May 24, 1960Eastern Ind IncCooling system
US3242689 *Mar 13, 1964Mar 29, 1966Worthington CorpCooling system and apparatus
US3293150 *Nov 30, 1960Dec 20, 1966Cook Ralph WApparatus for recovering essencebearing vapors
US3766914 *Jul 15, 1971Oct 23, 1973H JacobsHigh pressure resuscitating and ventilating system incorporating humidifying means for the breathing mixture
US4676956 *Dec 21, 1983Jun 30, 1987Kei MoriApparatus for photosynthesis
US4724214 *Jan 5, 1983Feb 9, 1988Kei MoriApparatus for photosynthesis
US5524848 *Aug 23, 1993Jun 11, 1996Ellsworth; Scott P.Humidification process and apparatus
US5699983 *Apr 12, 1996Dec 23, 1997Ellsworth; Scott P.Atomizing and mixing nozzle for humidification process
US6568202 *Jan 3, 2002May 27, 2003Sam HodgesPortable air conditioner
US7669838 *Jan 20, 2006Mar 2, 2010Co-Ordinated Thermal Systems Pty LtdAir handling heat exchanger humidifying apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/158, 62/314, 261/24, 261/121.1, 62/307
International ClassificationF24F3/14, F24F3/12
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/14
European ClassificationF24F3/14