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Publication numberUS2777697 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1957
Filing dateApr 26, 1952
Priority dateApr 26, 1952
Publication numberUS 2777697 A, US 2777697A, US-A-2777697, US2777697 A, US2777697A
InventorsCrossot Eugene A
Original AssigneeArchie Berkowitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf instruction device
US 2777697 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1957 E. A. CROSSOT 2,777,597

GOLF INSTRUCTION DEVICE Filed April 26, 1952 2 Sheets-Sheet l aiif IN VENTOR. EUGENE A. CROSSOT 74 246 Attorney Jan. 15, 1957 E. A. CROSSOT GOLF INSTRUCTION DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 26, 1952 m M52 T5 mm VC y m e A m N m E A w E United States Patent GOLF INSTRUCTION DEVICE Eugene A. Crossot, Milwaukee, Wis, assignor of onehalf to Archie Berkowitz, Milwaukee, Wis.

Application April 26, 1952, Serial No. 284,582 3 Claims. or. 273-187.

This invention relates to an aid for learning the game of golf and more particularly relates to a device for improving the stance of a golf player.

Although some effective devices have existed heretofore which can .be used by a golf player to improve 'his stance or swing or both, most of these have been clumsy, complicated, and dih'icu'lt to use. Many of the devices which have been designed .to serve this purpose have been either partially or wholly inefiective due to difficulty of operation or due to the inhibiting effect upon delicate muscular reaction'patterns of having leather or steel bands encircling head, shoulders, waist and feet. in some devices scales have been provided to show where the golf ball should be located; these have been divided into standard unitsof measurement such as inches or centimeters. Suchscales are of little or no use whatever to the novice who does not known where on the scale to place the ball or that part of body to which the scale pertains.

Scales in the prior devices have also been unsatisfactory because of undue complexity which required a great deal of experiment in adjusting the interrelationship between the various scales before they could be operated.

An object of the present invention is, therefore, to provide a device which will be useful to a novice in learning the game of golf.

Another object is to provide an aid which is extremely simple and is both efficient and etfective in learning the game of golf.

Another object is to provide such a device which is, in addition, economical and readily portable by a single person walking long distances.

Another object is a device which establishes the correct positions in which a golf ball should be placed in relation to the stance of the player and as a corollary, the correct position his feet should take in relation to the position of the ball.

Other objects will become apparent as the following description proceeds.

For a more complete understanding of the nature and scope of my invention reference can be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals refer to similar or'like elements.

Figure '1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of the device;

Figure 2 is a plan view of a portion of still another embodiment;

Figure 3 is a partially cut away perspective view of another embodiment.

In the embodiment shown in Figure 1, mat 1 is placed on the floor or ground. Mat 1 has embossed, inlaid, 'imprinted, or otherwise imposed on its surface a facsimile of a left foot print2 "and may or may 'nothave sirnil'arly impressed on the surface a facsimile of a right foot print 3, and on a line within 30 of normal to the axesof foot prints 2 'and 3 and parallel to a line drawn through the '-toe ends of said footprints, it has a series or group S Patented Jan. 15, 19.57

of snap receptacles 4 which may be designated scale 5. The position of snap receptacles 4 constitutes the indexing of scale 5. Each receptacle is numbered beginning at the receptacle nearest the left foot print. The numbers correspond to the numbers of the golf clubs which are to be used respectively in connection with the correspondingly numbered receptacles. For example the third receptacle from the left foot print is numbered 3 and is to be used in connection with the Number 3 wood club if the lie of the golf ball is such that this club should be used in playing the shot. Flexible strip 6 is provided at one end with a series ofsnap plugs 7 and is adapted to be removably attached at .this end to mat 1. Any other suitable attaching means such .as various types of friction snaps, rivets and buttons may equally well be used. Strip 6 has on its upper surface a series 8 of indexing marks which may be referred to scale 8. The indexing marks or Vertical scale 8 are numbered with the numbers of the clubs to be used respectively in connection with each mark.

In using .the device the line which passes through the center of snaps or scale 5 -or a line parallel thereto is placed parallel to the desired line of flight of the ball. Next the club is selected in view of the situation or lie of the ball with regard to the golf course. The subsequent steps which should be taken in using the device will be illustrated by the following examples, which indicate the mode of use of the embodiment shown in Figure l. Slight variations may be necessary in using the embodirnents as shown by the other figures.

EXAMPLE 1 if the position of the ball in relation to the golf course is such that the ball would be'played with a wood club or either .a 2, 3, or 4 iron the following steps would be carried out. After selecting the proper club, for example the 3 iron, the player selects one of the snaps on the end or" flexible strip '6. Six such snaps are shown in Figure 1, and this number is preferable although any number can be used as will be seen below. In one embodiment the player would make a selection, based on the following table, of the snap which would be proper for this height. Since scale 8 determines the position of the ball in relation to the reach of the player, the indexing of scale :8 and the positions of the snaps at the end of strip 6 are based :on the normal reach of a person of normal height whereas the reach of most persons difiers somewhat from normal. If the player therefore should find that the ball seems definitely too close or too far away from him 'he should choose respectively a snap position one-digit greater or one digit less in number as indicated by Table l.

Table 1 For men:

Position #1 Less than 5" 4 in height. Position #2 5' 4" to 5' 6" in height. Position #3 '5 6" to 5' 8" in height. losition #4 '5 '8" to 5 10" in height. Position #5 5" 10" to 6' in height. Position #6 Over 6 in height.

For women:

Position #1 Less than 5 in height. Position #2 .i 5' to 5' 2." in height. Position #3 5' 2" to 5 4" in height. Position #4 5 4" to 5 6" in height. Position #5 5' 6" to 5 8" in height. Position #6 Over 5' 8" in height.

The player then snaps flexible strip 6 onto mat 1 at that position of one of receptacles 4 adjacent the numeral 3 of scale 5 and then adjusts strip 6 so that it 'runs through the toes of the foot prints.

3 forms a right angle with the edge of mat 1. This may be facilitated by providing a line on the surface of mat 1, at each receptacle position in scale 5, which is perpendicular to the edge of the mat or by providing dots or index marks 'on the surface of mat 1, in a line parallel to the index marks of scale but at a distance removed therefrom and in positions corresponding to the positions of scale 5 so that an index mark at the extreme end of strip 6 can be lined up with the corresponding index mark on mat 1 for each receptacle position on scale 5 which is used, to establish a right angle between scale 8 and scale 5 for each position on scale 5 that is used.

The golf ball is then placed alongside the appropriate one of index marks or scale 8 which in this case would be the index mark adjacent the numeral 3. The ball is then in proper place to play the Number 3 iron. Since there is then no longer a need for index marks 8 the strip 6 may be placed aside so that it will not interfere with the players swing. The player then takes the Numher 3 iron and stands on the mat and places his left foot on left foot print 2. He then places his right foot on mat 1 in any position which he finds comfortable except that his toe must be on or near the straight line which A good rule to follow is to have the heels of both feet directly below the shoulders; this gives the player maximum balance when playing the 1, 2, 3, 4, woods and the 2, 3, 4, irons. The player must remember not to place his right foot in right foot print 3 on the mat unless his foot falls there naturally. The player then places his club head behind the ball and is then in the proper position to play the selected shot;

EXAMPLE 2 In order to play the 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 irons, the player follows the steps set forth above in Example 1 down to the point at which he places his feet on the mat. In the case of these irons, instead of using the left foot print 2 on the mat he places his right foot in right foot print 3; he then places his left foot any place on the mat which he finds comfortable except that his left toe should be on or near the straight line running through the toes of the foot prints. He then places the club head behind the ball and is in proper position to play the selected shot.

These examples have described in detail the procedure to'be followed in using one embodiment of the device of this invention. The procedure for using other embodiments is quite similar but varies in details.

The embodiment of Figure 2 has the advantage that means are provided for mechanically locating scale 8 perpendicular to scale 5.

The two lines of holes, designated A and C correspond to one indexing of scale 5 and the two lines of holes designated B and D correspond to a slightly different indexing of scale 5. The indexing of lines A and C is identical and the indexing of lines B and D is identical. It will be noted that in this embodiment the indexing of scale 5 is established by holes in mat 1" which provide suitable means of attaching a flexible strip with a rivet as shown in Figure 3 or with any other means of attaching such as that shown in Figure 1 which may, of course, be used. Strips such as strip 6" and 6, each carrying one of several various arrangements for the possible lines of holes which constitute a pair of lines, such as either lines A and C or lines B and D in mat 1".

Referring to Figure 3 there is shown flexible strip 6"" partly cut away at one end to show how it may be attached to mat 1" with a rivet Where a hole is provided in strip 6"" and a corresponding hole in mat 1". The indexing of scale 8' is established by spherical indentations 14 instead of indexing marks. In using this embodiment the golf ball is placed directly in the spherical indentation in the surface of strip 6"" which constitute the appropriate position on scale 8, instead of being placed adjacent to an appropriate indexing mark on the surface of the strip.

The establishment of an appropriate indexing which will provide for proper stance and correspondingly proper balance and ball placement for the majority of the very great number of golf players is part of the essence of my invention and although the specific dimensions of scale 5 and S are not part of the essence of the idea of establishing such scales, appropriate indexings are shown in the following tables.

Table 2.Indexing of scale 5 Designation of Golf Index Position Club One line perpendicular to line running through toes of foot prints, said perpendicular line tangent to the heel of left foot print 2.

ii; inch to the right of 1 wood.

as inch to the right of 2 Wood.

1; inch to the right of 3 wood.

1% inch to the right of 4 Wood.

iq inch to the right of 2 iron.

M0 inch to the right of 3 iron.

5%; inch to theright of 4 iron.

as inch to the right of 5 iron.

l inch to the right of 6 iron.

l inch to the right of 7 iron.

2 inch to the right; of 8 iron, 3 inches to the left of the line drawn perpendicular to line running through toes of foot prints and tangent tance from said tangent to the left heel print to the above described tangent to the right heel print is thus 14%; inches.

of points for attaching strips 6 to mat 1 Table 3.-P0siti0ns.

Position No.:

2 Each one inch apart Table 4.Indexing of scale 8 Designation of Club 22%2 inches. 23%6 %2 inch from 9 iron). 24 inches 16 inch from 8 iron). 24 dn ("An inch from 7 iron). 25% 946 inch from 6 iron). 26 inch from 5 iron). 27% is) inch from 4 iron. 28 546 (its inch from 3 iron). 34%; (5% inch from 2 iron). 7 34% 10 inch from 4 wood). 35 MB inch from 3 Wood). 367%; (V4 inch from 2 wood).

In order to establish these scales a thorough search of available literature was made but in addition a survey of professional and expert amateur golfers was made to determine the optimum indexing for persons having various physical characteristics. Embodiments of the device were used by a number of-these well qualified experts to further determine the preferable indexing. The indexes which are set forth above are those which are preferred.

It will be understood that substantial variations from each of these indexes will fall completely within the purto the heel of the right foot print. Total disawn-ens view of this invention. it is believed that the .indexing of scale 8 as presented in the above tables is appropriate, when used in conjunction with the table set forth above for persons of different height, for about 90% or more of golfers and is preferable without more than change in the indexing or useable with as much as 30% change in the indexing. These percentages refer to both change in spacing between next adjacent indexing marks and also the change in distance from the index marks to the base line which runs through'the toes of the two foot prints, it being understood that the relative position of the index marks as shown in Tables 2 and 4 would always be maintained.

Certain parts of the indexing of scale 5 can be changed only a relatively slight amount whereas certain other parts can be changed a good deal within what is considered a preferable range of indexing. The distance between the index positions for the 3 and 4 irons is in no way critical if the method of Examples 1 and 2 is followed and the embodiment of Figure l is used.

However, instead of establishing the position of the body from the left foot for the playing of some clubs and from the right foot for the playing of some clubs, the left foot alone can be used as a basis for establishing the position of the body for the playing of all clubs. In this case the distance between the indexing marks for the 4 iron and the 5 iron may be reduced to as little as of an inch or as much as about 3 inches. In this event one of left foot prints 15, 16 and 17 in Figure 2 is used in first establishing the position of the left foot. The several left foot positions are used respectively in playing the wood clubs, the 2, 3, and 4 irons and the 5 to 9 irons. In playing the first two groups of clubs, the right foot may then take any position which is comfortable except that the toe of the right foot must be on the line running through the toes of the foot prints. In playing the last group, namely the 5 through 9 irons, the right foot must be placed in one of the several alternative foot prints 18, 19, and on mat 1". An advantage of using this form of indexing is that the well known rule that the 5 iron should be played with the ball in a position equidistant from the two heel is followed. On the other hand a concomitant disadvantage is that in addition to being a complicated scale to use it provides an undesirably rigid relationship between the position of the two feet and this violate to some degree the rule that the stance should be the one which is most comfortable for the player; it also produces a stance which is .too broad in some instances. This latter disadvantage may be corrected by providing a great number of foot prints for each foot but it has been found that this makes the device complicated, diificult, hard to understand, hard to use, and tends to make the player undesirably and improperly tense in trying to maintain his feet in positions which are defined with an unnecessary degree of specificity.

It would seem that it might be either necessary or desirable to vary the distance between the extreme index positions on scale 5, namely the distance between the 1 Wood position and the 9 iron position for persons of various height, weight, sex, and reach and accordingly to vary the proportionate relationship between the other index positions. It has been found that thi seems neither necessary nor desirable and that it appears best to maintain the same spacing on scale 5 for persons of said different physical characteristics so long as a comfortable stance is provided, as it is in the preferable indexing set forth above. This conclusion has been based primarily on empiricial considerations.

It might also seem desirable to vary the index relationship on scale 8 for various persons of different height, weight, sex, and reach as well as to vary the distance of the ball from the players feet. However, experts have been found to agree that this step is not only unnecessary but is undesirable, primarily I believe because such pro- ".port'ronal change would 'be so slight as to be of no practical efie'ct.

The figures show the use of certain materials and fastenings for the various parts of the device for 'tny invention. It is to be understood that these are not to be considered as liimting since the mat has been made successfully out :of rubber, several plastics, wood, and fabrics, and the detachable :strip carrying scale 8 has been made out of the same materials and leather, leatherette and metal. 'Other materials which would be suitable for either of these parts include sheet metal, woven wire, glass and plastic fabrics, natural fiber fabrics, plywood, and water resistance paper compositions. Neither the mat nor the detachable strip need be flexible since either or both can be entirely rigid. I have, however, found it preferable that both of these parts be flexible. The flexibility is preferably such that the mat and the detachable strip can be rolled up and carried. I have found rubber and moderately elastomeric plasti to be preferable materials for all parts of the device except the fasteners. Any sort of fasteners known to the prior art may be used and I have found a number of types of metal rivet and snap fasteners to be suitable.

Having thus disclosed my invention I claim:

1. A device to indicate a golf players stance, comprising a mat adapted to lie on a flat surface and a strip removably attachable thereto, a facsimile of at least the left foot print of a human on the upper surface of said mat, on the same surface a series of attachment means for removably attaching said strip, said attachment means being disposed in a straight line adapted to be placed substantially parallel to any desired line of flight of a golf ball, and being substantially equal in number to the clubs used in playing the game of golf, and spaced apart according to a series of predetermined preferred distances from said facsimile, attaching means near one end of said strip for attaching said strip to said mat at said attachment means therein and a series of indicating means on said strip consisting of marks spaced apart from one end of said strip at distances in accordance With a series of predetermined preferred positions for placement of a golf ball when played respectively with each of a predetermined number of clubs.

2. A golf stance indicator, comprising a mat of flexible material adapted to lie on a substantially flat surface such as the ground and a strip of flexible material removably attachable thereto, at least one facsimile of a human left foot print and one facsimile of a human right foot print on the upper surface thereof, said foot prints being disposed in the manner of those of a standing human, on the same surface a series of friction snap members disposed in a straight line parallel to a line drawn tangent to the toe end of said left foot print and passing near the toe end of said right foot print, each said snap member spaced apart along said line a distance from said foot prints in accordance with a series of predetermined preferred positions for placement of a golf ball when utilizing respectively each of a predetermined number of clubs, a plurality of friction snap members near one end of said strip providing means for attachment thereto of said strip and a scale on said strip composed of a series of index marks and disposed at such distances from one end of said strip as to indicate positions for placement of a golf ball for utilization of each of a predetermined number of golf clubs.

3. A golf stance indicator, comprising a mat of flexible material adapted to lie on a substantially flat surface and a strip of flexible material removably attachable thereto, at least one facsimile of a human left foot print and one facsimile of a human right foot print on the upper surface thereof, said foot prints being disposed in the manner of those of a standing human, on the same surface a series of snap fastener members disposed in a straight line parallel to a line tangent to the toe end of said left foot print and passing near the toe end of said right foot print,

line inaccordance with a series of predetermined preferred positions for placement of a golf ball when utilizing respectively each of a predetermined number of clubs,

a plurality of snap fastener members near one end of said a strip providing means for attachment of said strip to said mat on said strip a series of index marks disposed from one end of said strip in accordance with a series of predetermined preferred positions for placement of a golf 'ball when utilizing respectively each of a predeter- 10 mined number of golf clubs.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS V Gibbs Feb. 19, 1924 Estabrook Aug. 3, 1926 Lingg Dec. 24, 1935 Rau e Aug. 22, 1939 Crowley Dec. 28, 1948 Fitterling Aug. 1, 1950 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain 1911

Patent Citations
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US1484390 *Nov 1, 1922Feb 19, 1924Gibbs Edmund DInstruction chart for playing golf
US1594359 *Dec 4, 1924Aug 3, 1926Estabrook Thomas WPractice board
US2025519 *Oct 3, 1933Dec 24, 1935Timothy L LinggGolfer's stance gauge
US2170216 *Feb 26, 1938Aug 22, 1939Edwin B Stimpson CompanySnap fastener
US2457351 *May 13, 1947Dec 28, 1948Robert CrowleyGolf training and recording apparatus
US2517189 *Dec 9, 1946Aug 1, 1950Mishawaka Rubber & Woolen MfgClosure flap structure for overshoes or the like
GB191116930A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2886326 *Jun 24, 1958May 12, 1959Olds Clifford EGolfer's stance gauge
US3141675 *Jan 9, 1961Jul 21, 1964Street Grover WCombined golf ball and golfer's feet positioning device
US3166327 *Oct 16, 1961Jan 19, 1965Champion Robert SArrow-shaped frame with adjustable foot and golf-ball position indicators
US3244421 *May 8, 1963Apr 5, 1966Hanna William MLaterally and longitudinally adjustabl feet positioning device for golfers
US3300219 *Jan 22, 1965Jan 24, 1967Sipos Steve GGolfer's stance training device
US3363903 *Jun 22, 1964Jan 16, 1968John P. O'brienGolf practice tee-off station
US3979116 *Mar 7, 1975Sep 7, 1976Matchick John TStride-box
US4023810 *Mar 22, 1976May 17, 1977Lorang Walter RGolf training apparatus
US4101130 *Jan 10, 1977Jul 18, 1978Earl RichardsGolf mat
US4355810 *Dec 22, 1980Oct 26, 1982Rydeck Joseph PGolf club swing training device
US4384718 *Aug 6, 1981May 24, 1983Michael J. PiperidesGolf stance and swing practice device
US4805913 *Sep 11, 1987Feb 21, 1989Bott Roger LDevice for developing golf ball address stance
US4915387 *Nov 30, 1988Apr 10, 1990Bax-Go, Inc.Golf practice and training device
US5171017 *Jan 10, 1992Dec 15, 1992Beta Systems, Inc.Golf alignment aid
US5478082 *Sep 24, 1993Dec 26, 1995Swingtrue LimitedApparatus for teaching or correcting the stance of a golfer
US5482284 *Aug 9, 1993Jan 9, 1996Vandever; Claude S.Golf address and stance teaching and practice device
US5492328 *Mar 7, 1995Feb 20, 1996Lundquist; T. R.Golf stance alignment device
US5944613 *Oct 29, 1998Aug 31, 1999Dubois; EnriqueGolf stance and ball alignment practice aid
US6024656 *Oct 8, 1997Feb 15, 2000Lane; JosephGolf swing training method
US6503148 *Apr 4, 2001Jan 7, 2003Joseph LaneGolf swing training device and method
US7066827 *Feb 9, 2005Jun 27, 2006Kevin Lamar StringerGolf training apparatus
US7527562Jan 13, 2006May 5, 2009Mason John VMethod and devices for aiming and aligning for a golf shot
US7575522Oct 2, 2007Aug 18, 2009Affrunti Joseph AGolf setup training device
US20050239568 *Feb 9, 2005Oct 27, 2005Stringer Kevin LGolf training apparatus
WO1987000762A1 *Aug 6, 1986Feb 12, 1987William James CrossleyGolf mat
WO2000025873A1 *Oct 25, 1999May 11, 2000Dubois EnriqueGolf stance and ball alignment practice aid
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/218
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3667
European ClassificationA63B69/36M