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Publication numberUS2778047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1957
Filing dateJan 13, 1954
Priority dateJan 13, 1954
Publication numberUS 2778047 A, US 2778047A, US-A-2778047, US2778047 A, US2778047A
InventorsNiels E Nielsen
Original AssigneeNewark Brush Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Staple strip rotary brush and method of making
US 2778047 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 22, 1957 N. E. NIELSEN STAPLE STRIP ROTARY BRUSH AND METHOD OF MAKING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 13, 1954 M6 2? Z. Mi wz Jan. 22, 1957 VN. EJNIELSEN 2,778,047

STAPLE STRIP ROTARY BRUSH AND METHOD OF MAKING Filed Jan. 15, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 BY :6. 214%? a United States Patent STAPLE STRIP ROTARY BRUSH AND METHOD OF MAKING Niels E. Nielsen, Summit, N. J., assignor to Newark Brush fompany, Kenilworth, N. 1., a corporation of New ersey Application January 13, 1954, Serial No. 403,728

7 Claims. (Cl. 15-198) This invention relates to a rotary brush made up of bristles of suitable material such as relatively fine iron wire which are mounted by means of staples on a relatively narrow strip of metal such as steel that has holes punched or drilled therein in proper spaced relation and then this strip is rolled up into a circle and the ends welded together after which the ring with the brush assembly thereon is mounted on and between a pair of circular plates.

It is the object of my present invention to provide a new and improved brush construction that can be economically manufactured and one that will give satisfactory service and operation.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of one of the disc type support plates.

Figure 2 is a plan view of a strip on which the bristles are initially mounted.

Figure 3 is a view of the strip shown in Figure 2 but with the holes therein properly spaced to receive the brush units, one of which is illustrated on the strip.

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a side view of the strip showing three of the brush units mounted thereon.

Figure 6 is a view showing one of the steps in the assembly operation.

Figure 7 is a view similar to Figure 6 but showing a further step in the assembly operation.

Figure 8 shows a further step in the process of assembly across the line 8-8 of Figure 1.

Figure 9 is a view on the line 99 of Figure 1 after the brush material B has been assembled as shown in Figure 8.

Figure 10 shows a complete assembled view of the greater portion of the brush.

Figure 11 shows a view similar to Figure 10 but showing a slightly modified form of construction.

Figure 12 is a view on the line 12-12 of Figure 11.

Figure 13 is a view on the line 1313 of Figure 11.

In the various views wherein like numbers refer to corresponding parts, 1 and 2 are the two plates used for supporting the brush assembly. Plate 1 has an annular shoulder 3 forming the principal support for the brush assembly. Plate 2 has a relatively narrow shoulder 4 which gives additional strength to the shoulder 3 for rigidly supporting the brush assembly. Each of the plates 1 and 2 has inwardly projecting fingers 5 to which reference will be further made. A strip S of suitable material preferably of steel is provided with holes 6 having a spacing 7 to receive staples 8 that receive the bristles B. The staples 8 have their ends 9 bent toward each other over the strip S as clearly shown in Figure 5. I prefer to punch or drill the holes 6 in the strip S but staples may be forced directly through the strip. In either case after the bristles or brush material have been fastened to the strip S the same is rolled up so that the opposite ends come together where they are welded. Then the 'ice ' assembled rolled up strip is placed between the two plates 1 and 2 as shown in Figure 6 and preferably welded to at least plate 1 and the plates 1 and 2 are then brought together so that their central portions come into contact as shown in Figure 7, at which time they are spot welded together as shown at 10 in Figure 10. Then the plate flanges 11 and 12 are forced into final position as shown in Figures 8 and 9 whereby the fingers 5 arranged in staggered relationship on the two plate flanges 11 and 12 are forced between the bristles as shown in Figures 8 and 9.

Figure 11 is the same as Figure 10 except for safety lock fingers 13 which are spaced radially near the central mounting hole 14 in the two plates. Here again as in my co-pending application entitled Staple Plate Rotary Brush the fingers 13 are positioned so that when the plates are forced together as shown in Figures 12 and 13 the fingers having a tapered side will engage the top part of the staples 8 thereby further assuring a safety lock of the strip in the mounting plates each of which has holes 15 positioned in the two discs so as to give the proper alignment positions for the fingers 5 and 13.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have provided a new and improved form of rotary brush.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A rotary brush of the character described having a pair of disc shaped plates of substantially the same diameter, one plate having an inwardly projecting circular shoulder portion radially spaced a substantial distance from its outer rim and forming a principal brush support, a relatively narrow strip of strong material having groups of staples carrying brush material fastened thereto, said strip being in circular form and fitted onto said shoulder portion support, the other plate having a narrow shoulder and being fastened to the innerside of said shoulder portion, each plate having fingers which project into the brush material on the final assembly of the brush structure.

2. A rotary brush as set forth in claim 1 further defined in that said strip is of fiat metal having holes properly spaced therein to receive the staples of the brush material units to form a continuous brush surface.

3. A rotary brush as set forth in claim 1 further defined in that said strip is of fiat metal having holes properly spaced therein to receive the staples of the brush material units to form a continuous brush surface when the strip is rolled up and its ends welded together for placement on said shoulder and further defined in that the metal strip is welded to said shoulder to fix it securely to the shoulder.

4. The process of making a rotary brush which consists in forming a pair of circular plates with projecting fingers and mounting holes centrally located in the plates,

one of the plates having a centrally located shoulder with its mounting hole therein, taking a relatively narrow flat strip of metal and stapling thereto in close relationship a plurality of brush units, coiling up the strip and welding its ends together and to said shoulder and then applying the other plate and welding it to the shoulder plate and finally pressing the finger carrying portions of the plates toward each other and forcing said fingers into the brush material, the brush material extending a substantial distance beyond the outer periphery of said plates.

5. A rotary brush as set forth in claim 1 further defined in that safety fingers are provided on each plate and these are located so as to be forced into the brush material directly over and in contact with a staple.

6. A rotary brush as set forth in claim 1 further defined in that when the final assembly operation is performed, the outer rims of the two plates are in substantial parallel relationship.

7. A rotary brush of the type described having a pair of side plates, each plate having an inwardly projecting circular shoulder-with the outer parts of the shoulder in the same cylindrical surface, theshoulder onone plate preferably projecting laterally farther than the shoulder on the other plate, a relatively narrow strig of strong metal having groups of staplescarrying brushv material fastened to the strip, said strip being in circular form and fitted onto at least the shoulder having the greater,

width and anchored thereto, means for fastening the References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Radinse May 21, 1929 Mertes Oct. 27, 1931 Parry Feb; 9; 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1714137 *Apr 27, 1928May 21, 1929Manufacturers Brush CompanyRotary brush
US1829665 *Jul 28, 1930Oct 27, 1931Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoCup shaped rotary brush
US2668311 *Nov 29, 1949Feb 9, 1954Fuller Bursh CompanyBrush element with fibers held in channel member and method of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5160187 *Oct 17, 1991Nov 3, 1992Drumm Arthur EStrip brush for mounting on a rotary drum
US5251355 *Oct 9, 1992Oct 12, 1993Drumm Arthur EStrip brush for mounting on a rotary drum
US5358311 *Oct 5, 1993Oct 25, 1994Drumm Arthur EStrip brush for mounting on a rotary drum
US5358312 *Dec 16, 1993Oct 25, 1994Drumm Arthur EMethod of making a strip brush for mounting of a rotary drum
US5445438 *Sep 6, 1994Aug 29, 1995Drumm; Arthur E.Strip brush for mounting on a rotary drum
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/198, 15/199, 29/525.14, 29/525.5, 300/21, 29/525.15, 29/463
International ClassificationA46B3/18
Cooperative ClassificationA46B3/18
European ClassificationA46B3/18