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Publication numberUS2778543 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1957
Filing dateJul 27, 1953
Priority dateJul 27, 1953
Publication numberUS 2778543 A, US 2778543A, US-A-2778543, US2778543 A, US2778543A
InventorsUrlaub George S
Original AssigneeHarry B Hollander
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metering dispenser
US 2778543 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan.

ll I,| II

G. S. URLAUB METERING DISPENSER Filed July 27, 1953 INIEN 0A 6661 96 5- Urlaub E ww A TTOR NEYJ';

United States Patent METERING DISPENSER George S. Urlaub, West Hempstead, N. Y., assignor of one-half to Harry B. Hollander, Middletown, N. J.

Application July 27, 1953, Serial No. 370,559

7 Claims. (Cl. 222-394) This invention comprises an improvement in fluid pressure operated dispensing devices.

The main object of the invention is to provide automatically acting mechanism which may take various forms, by means of which a predetermined or controlled quantity of the contents of a pressurized container is discharged upon each actuation of the main control valve.

An object of this invention in one form thereof is to provide in combination with the pressurized container a metering device operated upon actuation of the main control valve to eilect the discharge of a given quantity from the contents of the container.

Other and more detailed objects of the invention will be apparent from the following disclosure of several embodiments thereof as illustrated in the attached drawings.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure l is a plan view of a pressurized dispensing container;

Figure 2 is a vertical, central, cross-sectional view thereof on the line 2-2 of Figure 1, illustrating one form of the invention of this disclosure;

Figure 3 is an enlarged, central, cross-sectional view of the structure of the form of metering device shown in Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line i-4 of Figure 2;

Figure 5 is a vertical, central, cross-sectional view through a modified equivalent of the structure of Figure 3;

Figure 6 is a vertical, central, cross-sectional view through still another modified form of metering valve to be included in the dip tube of the container of Figure 2 in place of the metering device shown in Figure 2;

Figure 7 is a vertical, central, cross-sectional view through still another modification;

Figure 8 is a similar view of a final modification.

This invention is adapted for use in combination with a pressurized container type of dispensing device in which the contents of the container are held under pressure and discharged therefrom upon actuation of a main control valve by the pressure in the container.

As those familiar with devices of this type are well aware, the quantity of material which is discharged therefrom is not easily controlled. For example, repeated actuation of the main discharged valve for the same length of time will produce varying amounts of discharge as the pressure in the container falls off as it does with continued use. Furthermore, as is well understood, it is difficult to actuate the main discharge valve for exactly the right amount each time to produce a desired discharge. Since the rate of discharge is relatively rapid, small variations in actuated opening and time of opening the main valve will produce large variations in the amount of material discharged. The difiiculty of controlling quantitatively the discharge from devices of this type is also complicated by many other factors which need not be defined here since the basic difficulty is well recognized.

2,778,543 Patented Jan. 22, 1957 The main purpose of this invention is to provide an automatically operating metering device in combination with such pressurized containers to insure the ejection of substantially equal quantities of the contents upon each actuation of the main valve.

There is illustrated in the drawings one form of pressurized dispensing container now in common use. it consists of a cylindrical housing 11 of any desired configuration having a bottom wall 12 attached at one end and a top wall 13 at the other end. These parts are connected in any suitable manner as by crimp joints, soldering and other well known expedients. Mounted normally in the top wall member 13 in fiuidtight relation is a sleeve 14 which is provided at its inner end with an end Wall 15 having a valve seat. A valve 17 mounted on a valve stem 16 cooperates with this seat and is normally held seated by means of a compression spring 9. The valve stem 16 projectes exteriorly of the sleeve 14 and through cap member 18, so as to receive an operating knob 20. The cap 18 is commonly formed of a plastic material suitably shaped and provided with an integral dispensing or discharge spout 19. This cap member is so proportioned that the control knob 20 which is threadedly mounted on the valve 16, can be screwed down if desired to lock the Valve 17 on its seat.

Mounted on the inner end of sleeve 14 is a dip tube 21 which is commonly made of any one of a large number of available commercial plastic compositions. This tube extends down close to the bottom of the container as shown. As is well known the contents of the containers are usually in liquid form and are trapped therein under pressure with a suitable vaporizable fluid or gas which forces the contents through the discharge nozzle 19 when the main valve 17 is open. All of the structure so far described is well known in this art and represents a commonly used form of such device.

In accordance with the invention as shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4, the lower end of the dip tube 21, which is normally unobstructed, is provided with a metering valve member 22. In this case the valve member 22 is integral with the dip tube 21, and of course is composed of the same plastic material. The disc or valve member 22 is of circular configuration as shown in Figure 4 in the case of a dip tube of circular cross-section and is only connected to the dip tube over a limited area such as that indicated at 23. The dip tube with the valve disc 22 is preferably made of unitary construction with the parts arranged so that the disc 22 is normally in closed position across the end of the dip tube as shown in Figures 2 and 3. The disc is provided with a small venting aperture 24, as shown. While the valve disc 22 may be formed integral with the dip tube, it is also possible to form it as a separate member and mount or otherwise attach it to the peripherial edge of the dip tube 21 over an area such as the area 23 of Figure 4. in this case these parts are assembled so that the disc 22 normally closes the end of the dip tube which could be said to be the relaxed position of the material.

The construction is provided in this form to permit both the filling of the container and the controlled discharge of the contents when the main valve is opened. These containers are normally propellent filled through the dip tube, and it will be apparent that the valve 22 will move to the dotted position shown in Figure 3 during filling. The hinge connection 23 between the dip tube 21 and the valve 22 is stressed during filling. After the container is filled the stressed section 23 will gradually return to normal or relaxed position because of the balanced pressure conditions over all areas thereof, until it reaches the closed full line position in Figure 3.

With this arrangement when the main valve 17 is opened by pressure on the button 20, the discharge of the contents of the container will be through the restricted aperture 24, thus giving a much more accurate, and hence metered discharge of the contents. Normal variations in the opening and time of opening of the main valve will not produce such wide variations in the quantity of the materiall discharged.

The structure of Figure 5 is substantially the same as that previously described. The only diiference is that in the latter case the valve disc 27 with its metering aperture 29 is formed as a part of a short sleeve 26 which can be slipped on the end of the dip tube 21 and cemented in place with a suitable solvent or adhesive. In this case the valve disc 27 is connected to the sleeve 26 at the area 28 corresponding to the area 23 of Figure 4. This provides a less expensive structure than that of Figure 3, while providing the same functions which facilitate filling of the container and metering of the material to be dispensed.

The arrangement of Figure 7 is also an equivalent of that previously described in that in this case a sleeve 34) which will slide into the dip tube 21 is secured in place therein and is provided with a valve disc 31 with its metering orifice 32 like those previously described. The valve disc 31 is attached to the sleeve 39 over a limited area, as before.

While the structures previously described meter the discharge, they do not measure out a predetermined quantity if the main valve 17 is held open. With these structures material will discharge from the nozzle 19 as long as valve 17 is open.

The structure of Figure 6 will for all practical purposes attain the discharge of a predetermined quantity, no matter how long the valve 17 is open. in this arrangement a plug is formed internally of the dip tube 21, or

is formed separately and mounted and secured therein to form a Wall, as shown. This wall 33 is provided with a relatively large central aperture 34 and an eccentric much smaller venting aperture 35. The wall 33 is mounted in the dip tube 21 at some suitable point along its length. Positioned between the wall 31 and a motion limiting member 37 which can be a pin or an open spider mounted across the passage of the dip tube 21 is a valve member 36 shown in the form of a ball.

With the structure of Figure 6 mounted in the dip tube 21 it will be apparent that when the main valve 17 is open the contents of the container 1% will move up through the :dip tube and Will carry with it the ball 36. This ball may be made of a material whose specific gravity will be low in relation to the viscosity of the contents of the container, its velocity, etc., so as to be carried along with the material. The result will be that the ball 36 will seat on the wall 33 and seal the passage 34 after a predetermined quantity of the material has passed by the dip tube and been discharged from the nozzle 19. The quantity of material discharged will depend upon the internal diameter of the dip tube 21 and the placement of the stop member 37. As soon as ball 36 seals the aperture 34 the flow of material will be interrupted with the exception of the very restricted flow which will pass through the vent passage 35. Thus for each actuation of the main valve 17 a substantially limited and predetermined quantity of material will be discharged. The vent passage 35 is for the purpose of permitting the pressure in the dip tube on opposite sides of the wall 34 to gradually equalize itself when the main valve 17 is closed. This permits the ball valve 36 to gradually settle back against the stop member 37 in preparation for the next actuation.

In order to prevent augmentation of the metered quantity after the ball 36 is seated the modified structure of Figure 8 is suitable. In this case the structure is basically like that of Figure 6 with the following modifications. For structural purposes. the sleeve 14 is provided with a cylindrical extension 42 which projects below the valve 17., Mounted in this extension 42 is the wall member 33 corresponding to that of Figure 6. This wall member, as before, is provided with a main passage 34 and a venting passage 35. Pivota lly mounted internally of and on the tubular extension 42 is a bell crank lever comprising the arms 38 and 4t). Pivotal mounting is at 41. The free end of the arm iii of the bell crank is secured to the lower face of the main valve 17 in any suitable manner. The free end of arm 38 of the bell crank is provided with a valve disc 39 axially aligned with the venting passage 35. These parts are shown in Figure 8 in the position they assume when the main valve 17 is closed.

With this arrangement when the main valve 17 is open the bell crank 38-40 is actuated to cause the valve disc 39 to seal the venting passage 35. Thus with this arrangement a metered quantity, as in the case of structure of Figure 6 is discharged but is not augmented by additional material passing through the vent 35' since at this time it is held by the disc 39. When the main valve 17 closes disc 39 moves away from the venting passage 35 to permit equalization of pressure as before. Thus in this final form a very accurately metered quantity of material is discharged upon each actuation of the main valve.

Many modifications in the details of the structures shown will be apparent to those skilled in the art. For example, the extension 42 has been described as a sleeve, but it could be merely an arm positioned and formed to provide the pivotal support 41, in which case wall 33 would have an external diameter equal to the internal diameter of the dip tube 12 and would be sealed directly thereto or formed integral therewith. One advantage of the construction as only shown in Figure 8 is that the parts within the sleeve 14 and the extension 42 can all be assembled and inserted as a single unit.

in view of the possible equivalent modifications it is preferred that the scope of this invention be decided by the appended claims rather than by the specific embodiments herein illustrated.

What is claimed is:

l. The combination with a pressurized sealed container for a dispensible fiuid having a dip tube discharge nozzle and a normally closed main valve for controlling the movement ofrnaterial through the dip tube to the nozzle, means for actuating said valve of a hinged flap on the dip tube having an orifice for limiting the discharge from the nozzle, of said fluid in a metered quantity, upon actuation of said main valve.

2. The combination with a sealed container for a dispensible pressurized material having a dip tube discharge nozzle and a normally closed main valve for controlling the movement of material through the dip tube to the nozzle, and an external member for unseating said valve means for interrupting the flow of material through the dip tube upon actuation of the main valve after the discharge of a predetermined quantity of material from the nozzle.

3. In the combination of claim 2, said last means comprising a metering valve having a finite time of operation.

4. In the combination of claim 2, said last means comprising a wall having a discharge passage, a valve member for closing said passage as a result of the movement of material through said dip tube when said first valve is opened.

5. In the combination of claim 2, said last means comprising means forming a main discharge passage for said dip tube, a valve member for closing said passage as a result of the movement of material through said clip tube when said first valve is opened and a venting passage forming part of said means to permit unseating of said valve member after said main valve is closed.

6. In the combination of claim 2, said last means comprising cooperating valving members in the passage of said clip tube including a restricted venting port, a movable valve member for closing said aperture, and means actuated with said first valve for sealing said venting opened and to open the venting passage when said first passage while said first valve is opened. valve is closed.

7. In the combinfiition of claim 2, gals! last I:neans com- References Cited in the file of this patent prising a wall in t e passage of sai ip tu e having a dispensing aperture therethrough and a restricted venting 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS port therethrough, a movable valve member for closing 252,519 Righter et al Jan. 17, 1882 said dispensing aperture, and means actuated by said first 2,281,604 Smith May 5, 1942 valve for sealing said venting passage when said first valve 7 2,305,286 Ward Dec. 15, 1942 is opened, said last means being actuated by said first 2,401,391 Vale et al June 4, 1946 valve to seal the venting passage when the first valve is 10 2,701,163 Teller Feb. 1, 1955

Patent Citations
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US252519 *Nov 16, 1881Jan 17, 1882 Oil-can
US2281604 *Apr 24, 1936May 5, 1942Aeration Processes IncContainer for holding liquid under pressure
US2305286 *Jul 29, 1940Dec 15, 1942Knapp Monarch CoAerator and charging mechanism therefor
US2401391 *Nov 10, 1941Jun 4, 1946ValeValve for dispensers
US2701163 *Nov 1, 1951Feb 1, 1955Pharma Craft CorpMetering aerosol bottle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2839225 *Jun 18, 1956Jun 17, 1958Dev Res IncDispenser valve providing controlled flow and quick gassing
US2978152 *Jan 15, 1959Apr 4, 1961Batty Edward GAerosol can
US3001210 *May 12, 1958Sep 26, 1961Charles C DiehlDeodorant supply mechanism for toilets and urinals
US3080676 *Feb 19, 1959Mar 12, 1963Victor StanzelJet propelled model aircraft
US3169677 *Dec 17, 1962Feb 16, 1965Precision Valve CorpValve mechanism with metering ball for aerosol pressure containers
US3499581 *Apr 16, 1968Mar 10, 1970Valve Corp Of AmericaHand-held dispenser with mixing valves
US4117958 *Jun 7, 1977Oct 3, 1978Spitzer Joseph GVapor tap valve for aerosol containers used with flammable propellants
US4124149 *Dec 27, 1976Nov 7, 1978Spitzer Joseph GAerosol container with position-sensitive shut-off valve
US4154378 *Nov 1, 1977May 15, 1979L'orealMetering valve for pressurized container
US5429280 *Feb 18, 1993Jul 4, 1995L'orealFluid dispensing container for dispensing a predetermined quantity of a liquid
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US7014072 *Aug 26, 2003Mar 21, 2006L'orealValve for a pressurized receptacle
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US9254954 *Feb 14, 2014Feb 9, 2016Summit Packaging Systems, Inc.Metering valve
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US20160115911 *Oct 28, 2014Apr 28, 2016Ford Global Technologies, LlcCrankcase ventilation for turbocharged engine
EP2390009A1 *May 31, 2010Nov 30, 2011Scandinavian Amenities A/SMetering arrangement for dispensing metered quantities of liquid from a deformable container
WO1993016941A1 *Feb 18, 1993Sep 2, 1993L'orealFluid dispensing container
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/402.2, 222/402.11, 222/402.25, 222/464.1, 222/484
International ClassificationG01F11/00, B65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/32, G01F11/00, B65D83/425, B65D83/54
European ClassificationB65D83/54, B65D83/32, B65D83/42B, G01F11/00