Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2781525 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1957
Filing dateMar 7, 1955
Priority dateMar 7, 1955
Publication numberUS 2781525 A, US 2781525A, US-A-2781525, US2781525 A, US2781525A
InventorsLester L Bauer
Original AssigneeGendron Wheel Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible stretcher
US 2781525 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1957 L. BAUER COLLAPSIBLE STRETCHER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 7, 1955 I 4:11 m AT TY.

INVENTOR.

LESTER L.BAUER BY Fl 6. 7 i

6 z 4%. w m 2 2 El 5 a v 2 my 2 2 I m B 7 "I w'l L 1, ,1? 7 9 9 2 Mm 3M1 ww 3 2 m 2,781,525 COLLAPSIBLE S'TRETCHER Lester L; Bauer, Toledo, Ohio, assignor to Gendron gfiiieel Company, Perrysburg, Ohio, a corporation of Application March 7, 1955, Serial No. 492,555

4 Claims. (Cl. -81) This invention relates to collapsible stretchers and its objects are to produce a structure of this character which is positively secured or fastened in its extendedposition of use; and to enable the stretcher to be retained in its collapsed position by its own weight and without the use of separate securing means.

A further object is to simplify and improve the latching means, rendering the same positive in action and providing for the free and unhampered movement from useful to collapsed position.

A still further object resides in the construction and arrangement of parts which are such as to occupy a minimum amount of space in collapsed position and automatically to retain same in such position and without interfering with the simple movement of the parts to position of use.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will here inafter appear and for purposes of illustration but not of limitation, an embodiment of the invention is shown on the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of the collapsible stretcher in position of use;

Figure 2 is an end elevation of the stretcher;

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the stretcher in collapsed condition;

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the central portion of the stretcher showing the latch mechanism and associated parts;

Figure 5 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view of one side portion of the stretcher showing the latching mechanism and associated parts, the stretcher being in position of use;

Figure 6 is a view similar to Figure 5 showing the position of the parts during the movement from position of use to collapsed position; and

Figure 7 is an enlarged transverse sectional view on the line 77 of Figure 5.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises a collapsible stretcher for use in hospitals, doctors oflices and the like, which can be readily collapsed so as to occupy a relatively small space. As shown, the stretcher comprises two flat panel sections 10 which, when in aligned horizontal position, as indicated in Figure 1, are in position of use. Depending from the underside of each of the panel sections 10 at an intermediate point are brackets 11, which are arranged in pairs, one being disposed adjacent each side edge. Extending through each pair of brackets 11 is a transverse rod 11a, over which tates Patent O fits a spacer tube 111). The ends of each spacer tube 11b 1 wardly and outwardly curved end portion 13. Rigid with 2 the end of the curved end portion 13 is a vertically dis posed sleeve 14 and each pair of sleeves 14 is connected by a transverse brace 15. Mounted for pivotal movement in each of the sleeves 14 is a caster unit 16, which can swivel about a vertical axis to facilitate the ambulatory movement of the stretcher.

Pivoted at 18 to the lower end of each of the vertical legs 12 and projecting inwardly therefrom is a brace rod 17.

The adjacent ends of the brace rods 17 are flattened for a portion of their length as indicated at 19 and the extreme rod ends overlap each other and are pivotally mounted on a transverse rod 20, thereby enabling the rods 17 to pivot around transverse axes. Particularly as shown in Figures 5 and 6, the rods 20 is enclosed by a spacer tube 21 which abuts at its ends against the adjacent flattened end portions 19 of the brace rods 17 at opposite sides of the stretcher.

Also pivoting about the transverse rod 20 and abutting against the outermost of the flattened ends 19 of brace rods 17 are flattened end portions 23 respectively of vertically disposed arms 22. It will be understood that an arm 22 is disposed on each side of the stretcher and both arms are pivotally mounted upon the rod 20. The upper ends of the arms 22 are pivoted to a transverse rod 24a which is connected to downwardly and inwardly inclined brackets 24 fixed to the adjacent ends respectively of the panel sections 10. Enclosing the transverse rod 24a is a spacer tube'24b which abuts at its opposite ends against the inner side of the arms 22, thereby retaining these parts against lateral movement.

Slidable vertically on each of the upright arms 22 is an elongate sleeve 25 which bears against the brackets 24 when the stretcher is in use. Each sleeve 25 has fixed to its inner side adjacent its lower end a cross-arm 26 which projects equally upon opposite sides of the sleeve and is arranged generally parallel to the flat panel sections 10 when the latter are disposed in horizontal position of use. Pivoted to the opposite ends of each crossarm 26 are downwardly and outwardly inclined links 27, the lower ends of which are pivoted to a respective brace rod 17 substantially midway of its length.

On the outer side of one of the vertically disposed arms 22 is an elongate leaf spring 28 which is of slightly less length than that of the arm. The lower end of the spring 28 is fixed to the arm 22 adjacent the flattened portion 23 by a pair of attaching screws 29, the remainder of the spring being free for flexing movement. The upper end portion of the leaf spring 28 overlaps a portion of the sleeve 25 when the latter is in its uppermost position. Fixed to the upper end of the spring is a post 30 which extends outwardly from the spring and provides an actuating handle. Above the handle post 30 and fixed to the end of the spring 28 is a substantially C-shaped guard 31 which is adapted to hook around the sleeve 25 or the tube 22 for restraining the outward flexing movement of the s rm Fifed to the spring 28 on the inner side thereof and in alignment with the handle post 30 is a pin 32 which is adapted to enter registering holes 33 and 34 in the sleeve 25 and tube 22 respectively for locking the stretcher in its position of use. Additionally, a pin 35 fixed to the lower end portion of the sleeve 25 and projecting toward the spring 28 is adapted to enter a hole 36 in the spring as indicated on Figure 5, thereby to aid in securing the stretcher in position of use. It will be observed, particularly on Figures 5 and 6, that the upper portion of the leaf spring 28 is straight as indicated at 37, this portion being substan tially parallel and juxtaposed tothearm 22. -Approximately midway of the length of the spring is an outwardly inclined portion 38 which merges with a lower spring porr Patented Feb. 19, 1957 tion 39 which. is also approximately parallel to thearm 22 but spaced at greater distances outwardly therefrom.

In operation, when it is desired to collapse the stretcher from its position of use, the handle-post 39*is graspedand pulled outwardly inorder to release the pins 32 and 35 from their respective lioles andthereby rel'easinggt-he parts from their secured position, such outward movement ofthe handle post being limited by the guard 31?. Then bylifting upwardly on the post, it will be manifest that the arms 22 and associated parts are lifted upwardly, pulling upwardly on the horizontal-brace rods 17'. At the same'time. the sleeve 25 tends to move relatively downward on the respective arm 22, due to the articulation of parts. Asthe arm 22 moves upwardly, the pin 35 on the inner face of the sleeveZa' rides alongthespri'ngportion 37 and thereby' in fastening the parts in a position of use and when the.

parts are moved from position of use toward collapsed position, the leaf spring 28 ispositivel'y held in an outward flexed position to militate against the pin 32' entering the hole 34 and locking the parts.

One important feature of the above structure is the arrangement which enables the parts to be held in collapsed position and automatically retain the parts. in such position until such time as the stretcher is positively moved from that position to the position of use. This. is achieved by providing the flattened ends 19 of the horizontal braces 17 of a sufficient length so that when the.

pairs of pivotally connected braces 17 are swung upwardly to the collapsed position of the. stretcher, suflicient movement is allowed to form a relatively small angle therebetween and such as to enable the adjacent pairs of legs 12' to tilt inwardly at their upper ends toward each other. Thus in effect, the legs 12 are cit-center since they incline toward each other at their upper ends, the weight of the fiat panel sections 10 hearing against the parts causing the stretcher to remain in collapsed condition by its own weight. Manifestly this is of advantage because after the stretcher is collapsed and moved into storage, then no further concern need be given it so far as its moving of its own accord to its extended position. For the stretcher -to resume its extended position, a positive force is necessary, such as lifting the outer ends of the panel sections 10. By virtue of this structure, a smaller space is occupied by the stretcher when in its collapsed position. Maniiestly if the flat portions 19 were shortened causing a greater angular disposition of the legs, not only would greater storage space he required, but the stretcher would automatically open up to its extended position due to the disposition of 1 the weight of the parts unless restraining means were used.

Numerous changes in details of construction, arrange.- ment and operation may be efiected without departing from the spirit of the invention, especially as defined in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A collapsible stretcher having a pair of articulated assemblies movable between a position of use and a coliapsed position, each assembly comprising a bodysupporting panel section, supporting leg elements pivoted to the sidesof said sleeve respectively atone end and an intermediate portion of said brace arm members respectively, the improvement which comprises an elongate spring arm fixed at one end to said post with its upper end overlapping said sleeve, pins rigid with said sleeve and spring arm and extending in opposite directions, said spring arm having a hole to receive the sleeve carried. pin, there. being holes in the sleeve and post adapted to register when the stretcher islupositiouof usefor reception, of the spring armcarricd.

pin, the arrangement. being. such. that. in the collapsing movement of the parts the spring arm engages the sleeve carried pin thereby to hold the spring arm carried pin from entering the hole in the post, and a handle rigid with said spring arm for moving the. partsto collapse position.

2. A collapsible stretcher having a pair of articulated assemblies movable between a position of use and a collapsed position, each assembly comprising a body-supporting panel section, supporting leg elements pivoted to. the outer end position of the panel section, brace arm members pivoted to the lower portion of said leg elements respectively, means for pivotally connecting the adjacent ends of said arm members, said connecting means includingverticalpost members, and pivotal connections between the upper ends of said post'members and the adjacent ends of said panel sections respectively, a sleeve slidable on one of said post members, diagonal braces pivoted to opposite sides of said sleeve respectively at one end and an intermediate portion of said brace arm members respectively, the improvement which, comprises an elongate spri'ngarmfixed' at one end to said post with its upper end, overlapping said sleeve, pins rigid with said sleeve and spring arm and extending in opposite directions, said spring arm having a hole to receive. the sleeve carried pin, there being holes in the sleeve and post adapted to. register when the stretcher is in position of use for reception of the spring arm. carried pin, the arrangement being such. that in the collapsing movement of the parts the spring arm engages the sleeve carried pin, thereby to hold the spring arm. carried. pin from entering the hole in the post, an oflset portion of the spring arm at the lower region thereof to accommodate the sleeve pin and enable the spring to lie closely to the post in collapsed position of the parts, and a handle rigid with said spring arm for moving the parts to collapsed position.

3. A collapsible stretcher having a pair of articulated assemblies movable between a position of use and a collapsed position, each assembly comprising a body-supporting panel section, supporting leg elements pivoted to the outer end. position of the panel section, brace arm members pivoted. to the lower portion of said leg elements, respectively, means for pivotally connecting the adjacent ends of said arm members, said connecting means including vertical post members, and pivotal connections between the. upper ends of said post members and the adja cent ends of said panel sections respectively, a sleeve slidable on one of said post members, diagonal braces v pivoted to opposite sides of said sleeve respectively at one outer end position of the panel section, brace arm memend and an intermediate portion of said brace arm members respectively, the. improvement which comprises means on adjacent end portions of said brace arm members enabling same to overlap sufficiently when the stretcher is in collapsed position as to be over center so that the structure will be. automatically retained in such position.

4.. A. collapsible stretcher having a pair of articulated assemblies movable. between a position of use and a collapsed position, each assembly comprising a body-supporting panel section, supporting leg elements pivoted to the outer end position of the panel section, brace arm members pivoted to the lower portion of said leg elements respectively, means. for pivotallv connecting the a jacent ends of said arm members, said connecting means. including vertical post members, and pivotal connections be: tween the upper ends of said post members and the adjacent ends of said panel sections respectively, a sleeve slidable on one of said post members, diagonal braces pivoted to opposite sides of said sleeve respectively at one end and an intermediate portion of said brace arm members respectively, the improvement which comprises flattened end portions on the adjacent end of said brace arms enabling same to overlap sufliciently when the stretcher is in collapsed position as to be over center so that the structure will be automatically retained in such position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Goshorn Apr. 13, 1897 Boraks Oct. 17, 1911 Trautwein July 24, 1917 Klingler May 13, 1952 Heideman Nov. 4, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US580665 *May 8, 1896Apr 13, 1897 Piano-stool
US1006427 *Oct 17, 1910Oct 17, 1911Elias Howe CompanyMusic-stand.
US1234510 *Aug 19, 1916Jul 24, 1917Henry G TrautweinFoldable scaffold-jack.
US2596250 *Mar 23, 1950May 13, 1952Ira C KlinglerCollapsible stretcher
US2616719 *Jan 2, 1951Nov 4, 1952American Carry Products CompanConvertible baby carriage
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2943334 *Jun 9, 1958Jul 5, 1960Aeon Ind IncExtensible leg for furniture
US2975792 *Oct 3, 1958Mar 21, 1961Heiser Bruce DFolding tent structure
US3212463 *Apr 17, 1963Oct 19, 1965Hamilton Mfg CoFolding table assembly
US3476061 *Dec 28, 1967Nov 4, 1969Takahashi SasukeFolding table
US3656439 *Oct 9, 1969Apr 18, 1972Bremshey & CoTilting table
US3884160 *Nov 23, 1973May 20, 1975Gutierrez JulianFolding table center leg structure
US3976209 *Aug 9, 1974Aug 24, 1976Burton Edward EPick-up truck loading ramp
US4579381 *Feb 3, 1984Apr 1, 1986Williams James DFlexible utility stretcher
US5283919 *Nov 29, 1991Feb 8, 1994Grant Fred WFolding trauma stretcher
US6125485 *Jun 22, 1998Oct 3, 2000Stryker CorporationAmbulance cot
US7461601 *May 19, 2005Dec 9, 2008Lifetime Products, Inc.Fold-in-half table
US7765941 *Nov 2, 2007Aug 3, 2010Pro-Iroda Industries, Inc.Collapsible support stand for barbecue stove
US8196529Nov 11, 2009Jun 12, 2012Andrej WitkowskiFoldable table
US9167893 *Jun 2, 2014Oct 27, 2015Newtec Japan Co., Ltd.Folding table
US9603764Feb 11, 2014Mar 28, 2017Medline Industries, Inc.Method and apparatus for a locking caster
US20050274302 *May 19, 2005Dec 15, 2005Ju-Young JinFold-in-half table
US20090114780 *Nov 2, 2007May 7, 2009Jan-Nan ChenCollapsible Support Stand for Barbecue Stove
US20100116176 *Nov 11, 2009May 13, 2010Andrej WitkowskiFoldable table
US20120047650 *Aug 24, 2010Mar 1, 2012Ming-Hsien LinBed that is Folded and Expanded Easily and Quickly
US20140373760 *Jun 2, 2014Dec 25, 2014Newtec Japan Co., Ltd.Folding Table
EP2183993A1 *Nov 11, 2009May 12, 2010Andrej WitkowskiFoldable table
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/620, 108/173, 135/40, 108/174, 296/20, 248/436, 108/177
International ClassificationA61G1/02, A61G7/05
Cooperative ClassificationA61G2007/0528, A61G1/0237, A61G1/0212
European ClassificationA61G1/02