Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2781555 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1957
Filing dateMay 19, 1953
Priority dateMay 19, 1953
Publication numberUS 2781555 A, US 2781555A, US-A-2781555, US2781555 A, US2781555A
InventorsMachenry Richard
Original AssigneeAmerican Viscose Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Abraded-yarn production
US 2781555 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- Feb. 19, 1957 R. M HENRY ABRADED-YARN PRODUCTION Filed May 19, 1955 thee Patented Feb.- 19,. 1957 2,781,555 ABRADED-YARN PRoD crIoN Richard-MacHenr-y, Prospect Park-Pa, assignor to American' Viscose Corporation, Philadelphia, Pa, a corporation of Delaware Application l t lay 19, 1953, SerialNo. 356,008

6 Claims. (Cl. 19-.64)

This invention relates to improvements in apparatus for producing broken filament yarn from yarn comprising continuous filaments. The invention is concerned particularly with the production of multiple-ply yarns of the type used as a reinforcing medium for vulcanized products of rubber or rubber-like material.

Many of the yarns that are preferred for the reinforcement of flexible fluid-impervious goods, such as those yarns comprising continuous rayon filaments and especially continuous filaments formed from organic resins, examples of which are the polyamides, polyacrylonitrile, and polyesters (e. g., a polymer of ethylene glycol and dimethyl terephthalate), are characterized by filamentary surfaces that are smooth and unbroken as compared with cotton or other natural staple fiber. An important reason accounting for the superior adhesion of the staple fiber type yarn to a vulcanizate' is the large number of fiber portions which protrude laterally from the main" body of the yarn. Such fiber portions are interlockedwith the vulcanizable' material during vulcanization and thus inhibitthe movement of theyarn' within the surrounding vulcanizate.

In the manufacturing of fabric-reinforced flexible tubes, tubing of resilient vulcanizable material is ordinarily drawn along an upward path, thus functioningas a moving mandrel, through a braiding machine which progressively forms a braid of tire cord along the exterior surface of the tubing. The yarns which form the braid are led off of packages divided into two groups which are traversed in opposite directions along two interweaving sinuous paths extending in a circle about the tubing. A common occurrence in the operation of such a braiding machine is the tendency for loops of yarns, as the yarns relax'when the'machine is stopped, to settle down around the lower portions of the packages and under the lower end thereof when the braiding machine is stopped; Such behavior is particularly true of yarns which have the smooth finish characteristic of continuous filament yarns. Upon starting of the machine again, the loops of' yarn which have settled under the ends of the package are drawn tightly around respective supporting spindles and are broken as the machine takes up on such yarns. It is found that yarns which ar'e'roughened in accordance with the present invention reduce this tendency of loops of yarn to become loosened and to drop downwardly along the side of a yarn package supported with its axis aligned vertically. Moreover, the braidof the tubing discharged by thebraiding machine is subject, during subsequent handling, to'disarrangement of the yarns. Irregular spac ing. of yarns within the braid, of course, causes non uniform reinforcement of the vulcanizate, and the pro duction of :1 flexible tubular product of inferior quality. It isfound, however, that fuzzy yarns hold their desired relative positions within the braid of the partly manufactured product. in spite the disadvantages attendant to the use of continuous filament yarns for reinforcing Yulcanizates or other fluid-impervious products, the i nl2 dustry prefers to use such yarnsbecause of their relative low cost and superior strength.

It is an object of the present invention to'prov-ide an essentially continuous filament yarn havingfilament portions protruding laterally from the main body of the yarns. It is a further object to obtain protruding'filament portions in accordance with the foregoing object: by abrasion. It is also an object to provide a multiple-ply yarn of continuous filaments particularly adapted for forming the reinforcement braid of vulcanized products of circular cross section. It is still another object to modify the construction of a conventional winding machine by providing a device which rnay be readily substituted for an existing portion of the machine. Still another object is to utilize normal movements of the machine without adding to its mechanism to obtainsufiicient abrasive action on such larger type strands as those comprising multiple yarns or plies twisted together into a cord. Other objects, features, and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the invention and the drawing relating thereto in which Fig. l is a fragmentary perspective view of apparatus for simultaneously abrading the yarn and winding it into a supply package;

Fig; 2 illustrates in enlarged view a section of the product yarn; and

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view of a modified apparatus for abrading and winding a yarn.

To accomplish the objects of this invention, a textile strand, particularly a cord or yarn of a size suitable for incorporation into pneumatic tires orflexible conduitresistant to high pressure is wound into packages on an apparatus comprising a yarn-traversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambitextending' lengthwise of the winding spindle with the guide closely adjacent to, or actually in engagement with, the surface of a package being formed on the spindle, an elongated rounded abrasive surface extending in substantially fixed parallel relationship with the ambit of the reciprocable guide, anda yarn-tensioning device spaced laterally from the spindle and'angularly about the spindle axis from the radial dis position of the abrasive surface with respect to such axis whereby yarn passing from the tensioning device to the guide engages said abrasive surface and is traversed lengthwise thereof during reciprocation of the guide. Stated otherwise, the abrasive surface, while disposed closely to the traverse guide, extends transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the traverse guide and the yarn discharging point of the tension device, and the abrasive surface faces away from such a line.

As shown in Fig. l, a supply package 4, supported on a stationary holder 5 with the axis of the package extending upwardly, is unwound as the strand 6 thereof passes in a direction extending generally axially from the package toward and through a tension device, such as the conventional grid tension device 7 shown; The yarn 6 passes therefrom over an abrasion member supported fixedly on what is known as a traverse frame 1010f a conventional winding machine. The traverse frame functions primarily to support a strand guide 11" having. a reciprocating holder 12 which moves along agroove formed'within the frame it) and extending longitudinally of the axis of spindle 14 on which a product package 15 is Wound. As the conventional winding machine is usual ly arranged, the portion of the frame 10" providing a guide groove for the strand guide-holder 12 is aligned parallel with respect to the longitudinal direction. oftheperipheral surface of the package core 16 onto: which athe spindle 14 and, if the core 16 is conical, the frame portion for the holder 12 is skewed with respect to the spindle axis to provide an alignment thereof parallel to the core surface. A ball is normally provided on the frame and has a smooth polished surface along which the yarn may slide laterally as well as longitudinally with respect to its linear movement as it advances thereover to become wound on the package 15. The lengthwise direction of the bail is parallel to the ambit of the guide 11 so that the guide is spaced an equal distance from the bail at all portions of its ambit.

In accordance with the present invention, however, the bail or a portion of the machine analogous thereto is supplanted by the abrasive member 8. The abrasive member 8 may be supported by being secured to the frame 10, for example, by attachment to a surface thereof, such as the trough-shaped surface 18, by screws 20 and 21, or by being cemented to said surface. The abrasion member may be constituted of any material such as metal or stone having suitable hardness and surface characteristics adapting it to sever filaments in the outer surface of a yarn passing thereover. Very satisfactory and inexpensive abrasion media are the synthetic carborundum stones and aluminum trioxide stones molded in elongate shapes of uniform transverse cross section. A type of stone found very satisfactory is the one shown which is simply a sickle-sharpening stone of medium fineness and oval cross-section of the type found generally in hardware stores. The fineness or the size of the stone selected will depend to a large extent upon the size of the yarn to be abraded, the extent of abrasion desired, and the tension to which the yarn is subjected. Ordinarily, the amount of abrasion desired will be obtained through control of the tension. The tension is readily regulated by adjustment of pressure with which the grids of the tension device 7 are urged together.

Fig. 2 illustrates a section of the yarn 6 as it occurs in the prodouct packages 5 after being abraded. As depicted, the yarn comprises two plies of continuous filaments. Extending along the outer surface of the cord is an elongate surface 22 which extends in a helix of which one revolution includes a plurality of twists in the plies of the cord. Extending laterally from the body of the cord within the surface 22 are many filament portions which comprise portions of filaments adjacent points of rupture therein and portions of other filaments which have been pulled away from the body of the cord by its passage over the stone 8. Under ordinary conditions, a microscope is required for clear observation of the pattern of filament displacement shown in Fig. 2.

The helical surface 22 of displaced filaments, just described, is produced by longitudinal as well as lateral movement of the cord 6 across the stone, due to the simultaneous rotation of the package 15 as a drawing means and the reciprocation of the guide 1.1 lengthwise of the abrasive member 8. The spirality of the surface 22 may extend clockwise along one portion of the cord and counterclockwise along another portion with respect to the longitudinal direction of the cord due to the tendency of the yarn to roll on the member 8 and talre a false twist as the yarn is traversed laterally of itself and lengthwise of the member 3 by the guide 11 while also advancing longitudinally of itself.

Fig. 3 illustrates by perspective view portions of the winding spindle 14 and the traverse frame of the conventional winder hereinbefore described. The winder is modified in accordance with the present invention to provide an abrasive device which may be mounted in place of the bail normally mounted on such a winder. The bail has legs, usually cylindrical, which extend into holes of the frame at A and B. The abrasive device to be presently described comprises a cylindrical abrasive member 25, a supporting axle or shaft 26 therefor, and a pair of holders 27 and 28 through which the end portions of the axle extend. Each holder has a leg portion extending into the hole at A or B.

The axle 26 extends entirely through the abrasive member which may be mounted on the axle in non-rotatable fixed relation therewith, or in rotatable bearing relation therewith to allow the abrasive cylinder to turn with the longitudinal movement of the yarn 6 as it passes thereover. When the member 25 does not turn as a result of longitudinal movement of the strand thereover, the strand, of course, reciprocates lengthwise of the package 15 and the strand is carried over substantially the length of the member 25. The pattern of abrasion along the outer surface of the strand remains the same as that produced by the embodiment of Fig. l. The rotatable type abrasive member has the advantages of being self-cleaning to some extent and allowing substantially all of the surface of the abrasive member to be used. Somewhat more uniform wear and longer life of the rotatable member may be obtained than in the non-rotatable type. However, a rotatable member having a harsher or coarser surface may be used to compensate for the loss of abrasion by longitudinal movement of the strand thereover as compared to that obtained in using the stationary of non-rotatable type of abrasion member. The member 25 may be ordinarily manufactured as a molded tube or cylinder. The interior diameter of the member, when rotatable, is large enough to accommodate a bearing 29 at each end of the tube which fits the exterior surface of the axle 26.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. in apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambit extending lengthwise of the spindle and adjacent the surface of a yarn wound about the spindle, and yarntensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; means having an elongate abrasive surface disposed in adjacent substantially fixed relation to said ambit, the lengthwise direction of: the abrasive surface being substantially parallel to that of the ambit and the transverse direction of said surface extending away from the ambit and the spindle, the longitudinal direction of the abrasive surface extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the guide and a yarn-discharging point of said tensioning and guiding means, the surface facing away from said line.

2. In apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambit extending lengthwise of the spindle and adjacent a surface of a yarn wound about the spindle, and yarntensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; means having an elongate abrasive surface disposed in substantially fixed adjacent relation to said ambit at a greater radial distance from the spindle than the ambit, the lengthwise direction of the abrasive surface being substantially parallel to that of the ambit and the transverse direction of said surface extending away from the ambit and the spindle, the longitudinal direction of the abrasive surface extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the guide and a yarn-discharging point of said tensioning and guiding means, the surface facing away from said line.

3. In apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambit extending lengthwise of the spindle and adjacent the surface of a yarn wound about the spindle, and yarn-tensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; means having an elongate abrasive surface disposed adjacent to, and in substantially fixed relation to said ambit, the lengthwise direction of the abrasive surface being substantially parallel to that of the ambit and the transverse direction of said surface extending toward and away from the ambit and the spindle; the yarn-tensioning and guiding means, the abrasive surface, and the guide defining during operation of the apparatus a non-rectilinear path for passage of the yarn from a yarn supply to the winding spindle, the abrasive surface extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the guide and a yarn-discharging point of said tensioning and guiding means, the surface facing,

away from said line, said abrasive surface being convex in its transverse direction and disposed to place different transverse portions of said surface in tangency to portions of the path extending therefrom.

4. In apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambit extending lengthwise of the spindle and adjacent the surface of a yarn wound about the spindle, and yarn tensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; an elongate stone disposed adjacent the ambit having a medium grain finished in the range of 30 to 120 supported in substantially fixed relation to said ambit, the lengthwise direction of the surface of the stone engaged by the strand being substantially parallel to that of the ambit and the transverse direction of said surface extending toward and away from the ambit and the spindle, said surface being rounded with respect to its transverse direction and extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line'extending between the guide and a yarn discharging point of said means, the surface facing away from said line.

5. In apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide mounted for reciprocation along an ambit extending lengthwise of the spindle and adjacent the surface of a yarn wound about the spindle, the yarntensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; an elongate stone member, and a standard for supporting the stone member in a position adjacent the ambit which aligns the lengthwise direction of that surface of the member which is normally engaged by a yarn passing from said means to the winding spindle substantially parallel to the length of the ambit and at a greater radial distance from the spindle than the ambit, the transverse direction of said surface extending away from the ambit and toward said means, the yarn-engaging surface of the member being rounded in its transverse direction and extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the guide and said means, the surface facing away from said line.

6. In apparatus comprising a winding spindle, a yarntraversing guide, a traverse frame having a pivotal axis spaced from, and extending substantially parallel to, the spindle axis, a yarn collector of circular cross section associated coaxially with the spindle, said frame having a guideway for the yarn-traversing guide extending parallel to a longitudinal portion of the circular surface, said guideway defining areciprocal ambit of the guide parallel to said portion of the circular surface, means for urging the guide and a portion of the traverse frame supporting said guide toward the spindle and the ambit, and yarntensioning and guiding means spaced and positioned laterally from the spindle; an elongate abrasive member mounted on the traverse frame adjacent the ambit with the lengthwise direction of the member in approximately parallel relation to said ambit, said member being disposed on the frame radially outwardly with respect to the spindle axis beyond said ambit, the abrasive surface extending transversely in spaced relation to a straight line extending between the guide and said means, the surface facing away from said line.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,184,254 Koster Dec. 19, 1939 2,234,947 Clark Mar. 18, 1941 2,358,854 Elvin et al Sept. 26, 1944 2,363,205 Smith Nov. 21, 1944 2,596,306 Storey May 13, 1952 2,599,256 Hartley et a1 June 3, 19 52

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2184254 *Mar 21, 1939Dec 19, 1939 Method and apparatus for the production of broken
US2234947 *Dec 1, 1939Mar 18, 1941AmericanMethod and apparatus for the production of broken
US2358854 *Jul 8, 1941Sep 26, 1944Celanese Corporation of AmericaStabilizing yarn
US2363205 *Jun 23, 1943Nov 21, 1944Western Electric CoStrand handling apparatus
US2596306 *Aug 12, 1947May 13, 1952Celanese Corporation of AmericaDevice for producing stabilized
US2599256 *Apr 11, 1951Jun 3, 1952Courtaulds LtdYarn twisting machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3007298 *May 22, 1956Nov 7, 1961British Cclanese LtdMethod and apparatus for jet bulking of yarn
US3140526 *Mar 17, 1961Jul 14, 1964Tlamicha Adolf JaroslavMethod and apparatus for delustering plastic thread for textiles
US3158983 *Mar 18, 1964Dec 1, 1964Tlamicha Libuse AntonieDelustered plastic thread or textile
US3229347 *Sep 23, 1963Jan 18, 1966Libuse A TlamichaMethod and apparatus for roughening the outer surfaces of filaments made of high molecular plastic material
US3311960 *Jul 31, 1964Apr 4, 1967Milton KesslerMethod of making pile weather stripping
US3973359 *Jun 23, 1975Aug 10, 1976David Gessner CompanyWeb abrading assembly
US4164836 *May 31, 1978Aug 21, 1979Teijin Seiki Company LimitedBulky yarn producing apparatus
DE1254816B *Mar 24, 1958Nov 23, 1967Libuse Tlamicha Geb PeterkovaVerfahren zum Aufrauhen von vollsynthetischen Einzelfaeden, insbesondere Polyamidfaeden
EP0185353A2 *Dec 17, 1985Jun 25, 1986E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyComposites reinforced with high strength aramid fibers having fibrillated ends
EP0185353A3 *Dec 17, 1985Jan 7, 1987E.I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyComposites reinforced with high strength aramid fibers having fibrillated ends
WO2006106274A1 *Apr 7, 2006Oct 12, 2006RitmMethod for transforming and treating a textile yarn and implementing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification19/.64, 451/183, 28/220, 57/2
International ClassificationD02J3/02, B29C70/16, B29B15/08, B29C53/80
Cooperative ClassificationB29K2105/10, B29C53/8016, D02J3/02, B29K2021/00, B29C70/16, B29B15/08
European ClassificationB29C53/80B2, B29C70/16, B29B15/08, D02J3/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 15, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: BALBOA INSURANCE COMPANY C/O THE PAUL REVERE EQUIT
Owner name: JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY JOHN HA
Owner name: KELLOGG CREDIT CORPORATION A DE CORP.
Free format text: AGREEMENT WHEREBY SAID HELLER AND RAYONIER RELEASES ALL MORTGAGES AND SECURITY INTERESTS HELD BY AVTEX ON APRIL 28, 1978, AND JAN. 11, 1979, RESPECTIVELY AND ASSIGNS ITS ENTIRE INTEREST IN SAID MORT-AGAGE AGREEMENT TO ASSIGNEE;ASSIGNORS:WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC. A NY CORP.;ITT RAYONIER INCORPORATED, A DE CORP.;AVTEX FIBERS INC., A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0350
Effective date: 19800326
Owner name: NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 501 BOYL
Owner name: PAUL REVERE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY THE C/O THE PAU
Free format text: AS SECURITY FOR INDEBTEDNESS RECITED ASSIGNOR GRANTS , BARGAINS, MORTGAGES, PLEDGES, SELLS AND CREATES A SECURITY INTEREST WITH A LIEN UNDER SAID PATENTS, SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS RECITED.;ASSIGNOR:AVTEX FIBERS INC. A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0219
Effective date: 19810301
Owner name: PROVIDENT ALLIANCE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY C/O THE
Owner name: WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF DEL.
Free format text: AGREEMENT WHEREBY AETNA RELEASES AVTEX FROM ALL MORTAGES AND SECURITY INTERESTS IN SAID INVENTIONS AS OF JANUARY 11,1979, AND ASSIGNS TO ASSIGNEE THE ENTIRE INTEREST IN SAID MORTAGE AGREEMENT TO ASSIGNEE;ASSIGNORS:AETNA BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., A CORP. OF N.Y.;AVTEX FIBERS, INC, A CORP. OF NY;KELLOGG CREDIT CORP., A CORP. OF DEL.;REEL/FRAME:003959/0250
Owner name: WESTERN AND SOUTHERN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY THE C/