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Publication numberUS2781561 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1957
Filing dateFeb 26, 1953
Priority dateFeb 26, 1953
Publication numberUS 2781561 A, US 2781561A, US-A-2781561, US2781561 A, US2781561A
InventorsRobert T Gifford, Vernet Sergius
Original AssigneeDicks Pontius Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glazing construction
US 2781561 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

,-1957 R. T. GIFFORD ETAL 2,731,561

GLAZING CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 26, 195: 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG -1 F I G INVENTORS ROBERT T. GIFFORD &

BY 'SERGIUS VERNET ATTORNEYS Feb. 19, 1957 R. 1-. GIFFORD ETAL 2,781,561

GLAZING CONSTRUCTION 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 26. 1953 JNVENTORS 20 ROBERT E GIFFORD 5 BY SERGIUS VERNET ATTORNEYS U ite t s/Pa n 5m 7 2,781,561 Patented Feb. 19 1,3,5?

2,781,561 GLAZINGCONSTRUCZIIQN Robert T. Gifiord and Sergius Vernet, Yellow Springs, Qhio, a ssignors ,to-Dicks-Pontius Company, Dayton, I Q ia-a'sPr'norafimn Qhi Application February 26, 1953,'Sc rial No. 339,126 Claims. :(Cl. :69)

This invention relates to glazing construction, and more particularly to a preformed glazing strip of composition material adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame provided with stops, and a method of maintaining uniform cross-sectional contour in forming such strips.

It is a principal object of the invention to provide a preformed glazing strip of'resilientyield'able material for sealing the space between the pane and the stops without nails or other fastening means passing therethrough, which when fitted in place is retained thereby reason of its shape and resiliency without special fasteners or other devices, and which affords a ylieldable support for the pane, compensating for thermal expansion and contraction, wind pressure loads, and shock loads.

Another object .of the invention is to provide such a glazingstrip which will compensate for surface irregularities in both thepane and the stops to provide a good seal without requiring excessive .pressure for fastening it in place, and which is adapted for use with either multiplepane or single pane installations, irrespective of the size .of the panes orof the material of which the frames may be made.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a method for maintaining a predetermined cross-sectional contour during theextrusion of such a strip in a plastic moldable tate during handling and before curing for maintaining uniformity in the cured product.

A further object is the provision of such a glazing strip which may be made in a variety of colors and is pleasing in appearance so i that it may be used without being painted, but which will not be adversely affected by paint or varnish, which will maintain a good seal throughout wide variations in weather and temperature conditions, which is long-lived, which may be readily packaged and shipped, andwhich having in mind the advantages which it affords over glazing materials now in use such as putty or mastic may be used without substantial increase in cost over that of such other materials.

Other-objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.

In the drawings- Fig. 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic view vof a form of the glazing strip in accordance with the invention, partly in perspective and partly in section to show the details of construction,

Fig. 2 is a sectional view on a somewhat smaller scale of the gflazing strip of Fig. 1 in use in a double pane installation having wooden stops;

Fig. 3 is a view similar to 'Fig.' 2, butwith metal stops;

'Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary details of the window assembly of Fig. '2 showing two forms of corner construction, with portions broken away;

Fig. -6 is a view similar to Fig. '1' of another form of theglazing strip;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Figs. 2 and 3 showing the strip" of Fig. 6 in use in a single pane installation between woodenstops;

2 Figs. 8 to 12, inclusive, are views of other forms of glazing strips in which the respective cross-sections are adapted to provide controlled sealing-pressure characteristics, as desired;

Figs. 13 and 14 are cross-sectional views of still other shapes of glazing-strips adapted to be fitted to the pane before it is installed in a frame;

Fig. 15 is a view in section of another form of strip adapted for use with ,a form of stop which is designed to limit the compression of the strip;

Figs. 16 and 17 are views showing the progressive steps in assembly of the glazing strip and frame of Fig. 15; and

Fig. 18 is a cross-sectional view of another form of strip designed to limit the compression of the strip.

In installations employing insulating glass, such for example, as those sold under the designations Thermopane or Twindow, the glass units or panes are composed of two or more lights of glass separated by a factory dehydrated air space and hermetically sealed around the edges, ordinarily by either a metal framing or a metal,- to-glass bonded strip. Units of this kind are commonly employed in a large variety ofinstallations of comparatively large area such as store fronts, picture windows, window walls and the like, which are ordinarily assembled on site, and also in units of relatively small area such as double hung sash, casement sash, and similar installations, frequently factory assembled for delivery as a prefabricated unit. The frame may be either of wood, or of metal such as steel or aluminum, or of other materials.

Panes of this type may be held in place on one face by a backing stop, which may be integral with the frame and on the other by a front stop fixedin place by nailing, bolting or similar means after the glass has been placed in position. Regardless of size and of the framing material, it is necessary to allow for expansion and contraction of both the panes and the frame due to heat and cold, for movement of the pane due to wind-shocks, particularly in installations of substantial area, for window vibrations of various kinds and for minor irregularities in the inner surfaces of the stops, and accordingly the pane should be separated from the frame at all points, including its outer edge as well as its faces, and "the space thus defined must be securely sealed. The same considerations apply to single pane installations in which an outer stop'is used.

The glazing strip of the invention provides an efiic-ient seal for this space which is quickly and easily installed and. is unusually adaptable and flexible in use, offering important advantages over putt-y, mastic and similar glaz ing compounds conventionally used for such purpose.

Referring to the drawings, which disclose preferred embodiments of-the invention, Figs. 1-5 show a glazing strip 20 comprising a body portion 21 of resilient yieldable spongy rubber-like material such, for example, as sponge rubber, having a weather resistant surface or skin 22. The strip may conveniently be made in a continuous extrusion operation through a die formed to furnish a cr oss section designed to provide the pressure characteristics particularly desired. ln-the form of Figs. 1-3, which is especially adapted for-use with a metal-bound multiplepane installation, it includes fiat outer face 23 and upper face 24 meetingat an obtuse angle along edge 25, and a slightlyconcave inner face 26 broadened out at the top andhot QIn :to provide an upper'forwardly extending lip or marginal pressure portion 27 and a lower marginal portion 28. ,Quter face. 23 is provided with an adhesive area 29, and a strip 30 of nonstretchable cellulosic or brous material coextensive in length with strip 20, such as a strip vof cellophane, Scotch tape, or the like ad hesively securedto inner face 26, is allixed to such face fo p vent nss sps ti a thstsq pris t i stallation, and when the strip is compressed in installing it.

Fig. 2 shows the glazing strip of Fig. 1 in use in a typical installation of double pane insulating glass 31 fitted in a wooden frame, which is provided with an inner stop 32 formed integrally therewith. The pane includes two glass lights 35 spaced so as to provide an insulating air space between them and sealed in a metal frame 36, and is held in place against the inner stop by outer stop 37, secured in position by nails 38.

The glass and frame may be assembled in either a horizontal position or a vertical position as desired. In either case, glazing strip 20 may be supplied in the form of a roll and a strip of proper length unrolled therefrom along the face of inner stop 32, where it is held lightly in position by adhesive 29. The strip is sufliciently soft and compressible that in most instances the two ends at a corner may overlie each other to form a lap-joint and insure a void-free corner as shown in Fig. 4, although the two ends may be mitered as shown in Fig. at the corners. In fitting the strip edge 25 is placed substantially flush with the top of inner stop 32 which results in upper face 24 bulging upwardly providing a water shed in the completed assembly. Appropriate lengths of glazing strip are similarly affixed to stop 32 around all four sides of the frame, and the glass assembly 31 is then fitted into position against the inner faces of the strips where it is supported in place by clips or mounting blocks indicated diagrammatically at 39.

Additional lengths of glazing strip are then afiixed by adhesive 29 to the proper face of outer stops 37 and cut so that their ends are coextensive with those of the stops, and assembly is completed by pressing the outer stops into position with strips 20 hearing against the surface of glass 31, where they are secured in place by fastening means such as nails 38.

As clearly appears from the drawing, strips 20 on each side of the pane, being yieldable and resilient, will be compressed somewhat between the glass and the stops. The marginal enlarged portions are thus distorted, and press both inwardly and outwardly to provide a complete weather-resistant seal entirely around the glass. Nonstretchable material 30 secured to the entire length of strip 20 prevents elongation thereof in a lengthwise direction prior to use and during this compression, and deformation is largely limited to the upper and lower portion of the strip, which tends to assume the position shown in Fig. 2. Upper pressure lip portion 27 is forced or bulged upward and provides a water shedding surface, while the enlarged lower marginal portions 28 project beyond the edges of pane 31 and retain the strip securely against any tendency to work out of place. The inherent resilience of body portion 21 serves both to force the adjacent portion of the strip into any irregularities in either the glass or the stop, sealing them tightly, to allow limited movement to compensate for thermal expansion and contraction, and also to cushion the glass against sudden shocks or strains caused, for example, by wind-pressure in installations of considerable area such as large display windows, as well as jarring due to the movement of traffic, or during transportation and other handling where the glass is installed in a finished Window frame before shipment. At the same time resistance of the body of the strip limits compression sufficiently to avoid compression set which would tend to impair the desired resilience of the strip.

The installation shown in Fig. 3 is substantially similar to that of Fig. 2, except that in this instance the frame is of metal, and outer stop 37 is held in position by appropiiate fasteners 40 such as the stud shown or by pins, rivets, screws, bolts or other similar means in lieu of nails 38.

The embodiment illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 difiers from that of Figs. l5, inclusive, only in that the particular cross-sectional contour of strip 20 is in this instance adapted to installations in which substantially equal pressure is desired on both the upper and lower edges of the strip as, for example, in the single-pane installation illustrated in Fig. 7. Here the glass does not have the surrounding frame 36, and the enlarged marginal lower edge 41 may be in substantially the same form as upper pressure portion 27, serving when installed to lock the strip in position while permitting free adjusting movement, as shown in Fig. 7. Assembly and use are the same as described in connection with the embodiment of Figs. 1-5.

The sureness of the seal depends upon maintaining a firm yieldable sealing engagement of the glazing strip against both the glass pane and the stop. The strip should not be over-compressed so as to acquire a permanent set and lose its resilient yieldable sealing quality. The points at which pressure of the strip is desired, furthermore, will vary with the particular type and size of installation. Proper balance between the desired sealing engagement and necessary limitation of degree of compression may be secured in accordance with the invention by so forming and contouring the strip as to provide the desired predetermined characteristics. Thus, the pressure portions may be made in a wide variety of shapes. So also the non-stretchable material may be either inside or outside body portion 21, and may be in different form than the cellulosic tape already referred to. Figs. 8 through 18 illustrate strips of varying contours adapted to provide particular sealing qualities, as desired.

The embodiment of Fig. 8 is similar to those of Figs. 1 and 6, with the variations that here the seal is concentrated at the top edge, rather than at both top and bottom edges of the strip and non-stretchable material 30 is in the form of an ungummed strip of paper, cellophane or the like applied to adhesive area 25, the adhesive area remaining providing ample support for fixing the strip to the stop.

In the embodiment of Figs. 9 and 10, the material 47 for preventing elongation is indicated as a length of nonstretchable material which may, for example, be cellulose tape, impregnated fabric tape, or one or more strands of plastic filament or wire, embedded in the body portion 21 of the strip and extruded with the uncured sponge rubber as part of the original forming process. The material may be so located and single strands so spaced as not to interfere with particular pressure etfects desired.

The forms of both Figs. 9 and 10 are intended for producing a seal with smaller pressure than required by the forms previously illustrated and described. That of Fig. 9 uses double concave lips 48 and 49 at both the top and bottom of the strip, on both inner and outer faces, thus reducing the sealing surface with consequent desired reduction in pressure necessary to compress the strip in place. Here adhesive 29 is preferably placed in the two spaced concavities at the outer faces of the strip, as shown in the drawing. The form of Fig. 10 provides a plurality of small projecting lips 55 each individually easily compressed, and is particularly well adapted for use where there may be dimensional variations in the window stop; here the adhesive 29 is affixcd to one side and in practice does not interfere with proper compression and sealing.

Figs. 11 and 12 illustrate other shapes of the glazing strip. Here, also, a different method is used for securing the non-stretchable material 56'to the strip. In this form a length of substantially non-stretchable material is coated with a rubber compound dissolved in a suitable solvent and applied in its uncured state along one side of the extruded body portion 21 of the strip before the strip is cured, as indicated at 57. In the curing process this rubber compound is vulcanized and bonds the nonstretchable material firmly into the strip. The shape of Fig. 11 is adapted to provide pressure at both top and bottom on both the inner and outer faces, while that of Fig. 12 is diiferent in cross-section and includes a lip eas est portion 58 on its outer face for extending over the upper edge of the outer stop to provide a water shed.

The extruded strip is relatively unstable until cured and it has been found that difficulty may be experienced in maintaining proper dimensional stability. If the strip is carried away from the extruder faster than the extrusion rate it tends to be drawn out and its cross-section narrowed, and if it is carried through the curing oven at a rate slower than the extrusion rate it tends to pile up and be subject to strains and undesirable variations in crosssection. This difliculty. may be avoided by extruding through the die along with and preferably embedded in the rubber-like material at the same rate at which the strip is formed, a supporting strand which may, for example, be ordinary cotton string, as shown at 51 in Figs. 8, 13 and 14. With a strand thus simultaneously incorporated it has been found that by a light but constant pull on the string embedded in the uncured strip longitudinal stability is obtained and unsupported lengths of constant cross-section extending sufiicient distance for easily handling the strip before curing are obtained.

The embodiments of Figs. 13 and 14 are in the form of channel sections, including inner and outer sections 60 and 61 respectively, adapted to be affixed directly around the edges of the window before it is fitted in the frame,

rather than to the frame stops as previously described. In the embodiment of Fig. 13 the non-stretchable material 62 for preventing elongation is placed at the bottom portion only of channel 63 defined by the inner and outer portions, and adhesive area 29 is provided on the inner face of both sponge rubber sections 61 and 62. In the form of Fig. 14 the non-stretchable strip extends completely around the inner surface of channel '63, and the adhesive area 29 is provided on the inner faces of this material. V

As .pointed out, to insure long life the strip should .not :be excessively .compressed so as to set the compression permanently and destroy the yielding resilience of thematerial which effects the seal. Figs. 15 to 317, inclusive, illustrate a .form ;of the glazing strip in accordance withthe invention which is adapted for use with aspecial- .ly formed stop for controllingclosely the desired degree of compression. In this .form only a singlestop .65 is shown, which includes a tongue 66 extending inwardly :in the direction of window 31. The glazing strip is sub- .stantially rectangular in exterior cross-section and is provided with an intermediate groove or channel 67 adapted .to receive the tongue. The body portion 21 of "the strip on both sides .of groove 67 is of sponge rubber, and in this form the non-stretching material 68 is substantially solid rubber which-is extruded at the same timeas and is integral with the'sponge rubber sections, and is substantially non-compressible.

The length of tongue 66 is less than the depth of groove 67, so that in assembling a unit with a strip of this form the mainbody portions 21 of the-strip are compressed only to the'extent by which the length of tongue v66 and thickness of non-stretchable portion .68, taken together, is less than the initial thickness-of the'strip before compression. Thus by dimensioning the various parts in accordance with the predetermined degree of compression-desiredflhe compression can be closely controlled.

Fig. 18 illustrates means for controlling the extent of compression to obtain results similar to those of Figs. l5- 17 without necessityfor a special stop. In this embodiment the section of solid rubber 70, which may be extruded with sponge-rubberportion 71, is proportioned so as to extend for a substantial portion of the width of'the strip. When astrip in this form -is installed between a pane and a stop, the extent of compression possible will be substantially controlled by the thickness of portion 70, thus insuring that sponge rubber portion 71 is not compressed beyond the desired extent.

Although, if-desired, an adhesive area may be applied on both sides of the strip, adhesive ordinarily is not necessary .on the windowor glass side and in facttends to hinder installation byadheringto the pane before the strip is properly 'in place, and more satisfactory results have beenobtained by placing the adhesive on the outer or stop side of the strip only; The primary function .of the adhesive is to facilitate placing and holding the strip in proper position during installation, the sealing being accomplished by the resilient pressure of thes'trip against both pane and stop.

The glazing construction in accordance with the invention is illustrated and described herein for convenience and clarity in connection with installation of various forms of glass panes in window frames, but the invention is not limited to such use and is adaptable to the mounting or installation of other panels or elements for different purposes, where the sealing strip is supported on both sides of the panel by a suitable retaining strip or stop, and the reference to panes is understood to include such other elements. It is not necessary, moreover, that the stops should be straight, the strip being adaptable for use in curved surfaces such as automobile windows or panels and the like.

The strip in accordance with the invention easily lends itself to incorporating a wide range of colors in its formation. This may effectively be done by applying a coating of resistant rubber polymer suitably pigmented or dyed to the exterior of a carbon-black-filled strip of sponge rubber-like material in order to insure that proper resiliency is maintained. Thus it is possible to produce a variety of color effects without having to paint the strip affording the possibili y of substantial savings in the preparationof, for example, windows sold as an assembled unit.

An important advantage of the invention is that in the use of mastic or other non-setting sealing materials such as used heretofore, compensation during movement of the pane and'the frame due .to the differences of thermal expansion rates between the two materials is allowed only through external deflection and flow. This movement is restricted in proportion to the viscosity of the material, and once displaced from the original glazed position, the material, having no memory, resists repositioning. when thenormal position is reassumed. This material deflection exists only while there is constant adhesion against the glass and stop surfaces. When the adhesiveness of a mastic strip surface is reduced through aging, oxidation, or other causes, the mastic-strip surfaces will slide along the :glass or stop surface, breaking the seal and promoting leakage.

In a sponge rubber sealing strip such as herein provided, this relative movement between the strip and the compressing stop is relatively unrestricted due to the ability of one surface to roll or slide against the position of the opposite surface, and this movementdoes .not affect the compression seal of the strip and the sealing effect is accordingly maintained.

It will thus be apparent that the glazing strip of the invention is quite simple in construction and application, and highly flexible and adaptable in use. It provides in itself, without requiring any special tools or fastening means, an efiicient, simple, certain seal for the space between the glass pane and the frame in which it is supported. There are no nails or other fastening means passing through it which would tend to rust out or otherwise to fail so as to permit air or water to seep in, and this absence of fastening means also prevents any tendency to tear the strip or to break its protective surface, both during installation, and after long use. As pointed out, the strip may be used in frames of substantially any material, and is equally useful in connection with glass or panels of single or multiple pane construction, and of substantially any size.

The strip lends itself particularly ,well to manufacturing operations on a production line basis in that it assures substantially greater uniformity in results than can be obtained with putty. or mastic. Additionally, it is simpler and cleaner to use,.and may be installed considerably 7 more quickly. A particular advantage in connection with manufacturing operations is that it does not require any change in the materials, equipment or methods already in use, but may merely be substituted for the putty or other glazing compound previously used without other change, and requires if anything less skill on the part of the labor employed.

The glazing strip offers substantially the same ad vantages for on-site installations on a commercial scale as for factory operations, and at the same time is so simply and easily used that it may readily be installed by an ordinary handy-man or home owner.

While the several forms herein described constitute preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise forms and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A glazing strip of preformed composition adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops, without nails or fastening means passing therethrough comprising, in combination, an elongated strip of spongy rubberlike material of substantially greater heighth than thickness having a weather resistant surface, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and fixed to said strip along its longitudinal extent for preventing elongation of said strip prior to its installation, and a coating of adhesive on at least one side of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stops during assembly, the opposite side of said strip being adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement against said pane, said strip including a lower marginal portion adapted to project below the edge of said pane when assembled in said frame for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip.

2. A glazing strip of preformed plastic composition adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops, without nails or fastening means passing therethrough comprising, in combination, an elongated relatively flat strip of spongy rubberlike material having an integrally formed weather resistant surface, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to the exterior of said strip for preventing elongation of said strip prior to and during the installa tion thereof, and a coating of adhesive on at least one side of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stops during assembly, the opposite side of said strip being adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement against said pane, said strip including a lower marginal portion adapted to project below the edge of said pane when assembled in said frame for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip.

3. A glazing strip of preformed composition adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops without nails or fastening means passing therethrough comprising, in combination, an elongated relatively fiat strip of spongy rubberlike material having a weather resistant surface, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said strip for preventing elongation of said strip upon lateral compression thereof, and a coating of adhesive on the frame side of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stops during assembly with its outer edge extending at least to the edge of the stop and its inner marginal portion projecting beyond the edge of said pane, the opposite side of said strip being adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement against said pane with its inner marginal portion extending beyond the edge of said pane for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip.

4. A glazing strip of preformed plastic composition adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops without nails or fastening means passing therethrough comprising, in combination, an elongated ribbon-shaped body of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body including an enlarged marginal portion at the upper edge adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement against said pane, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said body for preventing elongation of said strip prior to its installation, a coating of adhesive on at least one side of said body for securing the glazing strip in position on said stops during assembly with its marginal portion at the lower edge thereof extending beyond the edge of said pane for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip when assembled between said pane and said frame.

5. A glazing strip of preformed plastic composition adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops without nails or fastening means passing therethrough comprising, in combination, an elongated ribbon-shaped body of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body including an enlarged marginal portion at the upper edge adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement against said pane and an enlarged marginal portion at the lower edge adapted to project around the outer edges of said pane for locking said strip in position when assembled in said frame, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said body for preventing elongation of said strip prior to its installation, a coating of adhesive on at least one side of said body for securing the glazing strip in position on said stops prior to and during installation.

6. A preformed glazing strip for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops comprising a body portion of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body portion being relatively thin and flat in cross-section, a resilient yieldable portion on at least one side of said body portion adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement between said pane and said stops, said strip including a lower marginal portion adapted to project below the edge of said pane When assembled in said frame for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said strip for preventing elongation thereof prior to installation while permitting lateral motion thereof during and following installation, and a coating of adhesive on at least one face of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stops during assembly.

7. A preformed glazing strip for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops comprising a body portion of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body portion being relatively thin and fiat in cross-section, a resilient yieldable portion at the upper edge of at least one side of said body portion adapted to bear in yieldabl'e sealing engagement between said pane and said stops, an enlarged marginal portion on the lower edge of said body portion adapted to extend beyond the edge of said pane for locking said strip in place, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said strip for preventing elongation thereof while permitting laterial motion of said body portion during and following installation, and a coating of adhesive on at least one face of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stops during installation.

8. A preformed glazing strip adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops comprising a relatively fiat body of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body including at least one enlarged pressure portion on at least one face thereof adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement between said pane and said stops when said strip is compressed therebetween, a relatively non-stretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said strip at a portion spaced from said enlarged pressure porportion for preventing elongation of said strip upon compression thereof between said pane and said stops while permitting lateral movement of said pressure portion, a coating of adhesive on at least the stop side of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stop, said strip including a lower marginal portion adapted to project below the edge of said pane when assembled in said frame for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip.

9. A preformed glazing strip adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops comprising a relatively thin flat body of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, said body including a plurality of pressure portions integral therewith on at least one face thereof adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement between said pane and said stops when said strip is compressed therebetween, a relatively nonstretchable material secured to said strip throughout its length at a portion spaced from said enlarged pressure portion for preventing elongation of said strip upon compression thereof between said pane and said stops while permitting lateral movement of said pressure portion, and a coating of adhesive on at least the stop side of said strip for securing said strip in position on said stop during assembly, said body including a lower marginal portion adapted to project below the edge of said pane when assembled in said frame for tending to resist displacement of said strip in direction transverse to the strip.

10. A preformed glazing strip adapted for use in the assembly of a pane in a frame having stops comprising an elongated channel-shaped body portion of spongy rubber-like material having a weather resistant surface, the inner faces of said channel being relatively flat for receiving the edge of said pane therein and the outer faces being adapted to bear in yieldable sealing engagement between said pane and said stops, at relatively nonstretchable material coextensive in length with and secured to said strip for preventing elongation thereof upon compression of said strip between said pane and said stops and a coating of adhesive on the inner face of said channel for securing said strip in position on said pane prior to installation thereof in said frame.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2971616 *Dec 6, 1956Feb 14, 1961William Bayley CoBuilding panel
US3037810 *Sep 8, 1959Jun 5, 1962Gen Motors CorpWindshield and rear window seals
US3167827 *Jan 24, 1963Feb 2, 1965Gen Motors CorpVinyl weatherstrip
US3177534 *Nov 13, 1962Apr 13, 1965Gen Motors CorpCushioned sealing strip
US3288667 *Apr 29, 1964Nov 29, 1966Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoSealing element
US3333381 *Apr 20, 1964Aug 1, 1967Daimler Benz AgSealing strip
US3344573 *May 17, 1965Oct 3, 1967Durell Products IncWindow glazing system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/204.591, 52/204.593
International ClassificationE06B3/58, E06B3/62
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/6232, E06B2003/6229, E06B2003/6273, E06B2003/6291, E06B2003/6279, E06B2003/6282, E06B2003/6276, E06B2003/6285, E06B3/62, E06B2003/6258
European ClassificationE06B3/62