Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2781583 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1957
Filing dateApr 20, 1955
Priority dateApr 20, 1955
Publication numberUS 2781583 A, US 2781583A, US-A-2781583, US2781583 A, US2781583A
InventorsGrimble Donald O
Original AssigneeGrimble Donald O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gunsight attachment
US 2781583 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1957 o, GRlMBLE 1 2,781,583

GUNSIGHT ATTACHMENT Filed A ril 20, 1955 l INVENTOR. M 0 2M /9/ 0...! iv 10/ I "7 7 Arm/Mfrs.

United States Patent GUNSIGHT ATTACHMENT Donald 0. Grimble, Eagle Harbor, N. Y.

Application April 20, 1955, Serial No. 502,661

1 Claim. (CI. 33-47) This invention relates to a gunsight attachment for a single barrel shotgun.

As conventionally constructed at the present time, a single barrel shotgun is provided with a front sight in the form of a small ball or bead suitably mounted on the top of the gun barrel adjacent the muzzle end thereof. Such a bead type sight is satisfactory enough for hunting small game with buckshot, but is unsatisfactory because not permitting sufliciently accurate aiming when the gun is used with slugs for hunting big game such as deer.

It is accordingly the primary object of the present invention to provide an attachment for a single barrel shotgun to convert its normal front bead type sight into one having a blade extending upright and longitudinally of the gun barrel, such as is used on rifles, thereby permitting the shotgun to be aimed more accurately when firing slugs.

Another object is to provide such a gunsight attachment which in its mounting on the shotgun barrel mechanically cooperates with some part of the existing front bead sight so as to insure that the attached blade type sight is properly oriented on the gun barrel insofar as its angular position is concerned.

Another object is to provide such a gunsight attachment which does not require any preliminary modification or alteration of the shotgun barrel in order to adapt it to receive the attachment.

A further object is to provide such a gunsight attachment which is simple in construction and which can be easily and quickly applied or removed as is required for the type of hunting being engaged in by the hunter.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a gunsight attachment embodying one form of the present invention and showing the same removed from the muzzle of a single barrel shotgun which is also illustrated in this figure, such gun barrel having one conventional form of bead type front sight shown thereon.

Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view through the gunsight attachment shown in Fig. 1 but showing the same mounted in operative position on the gun barrel.

Fig. 3 is a vertical transverse sectional view thereof taken on line 3-3, Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view thereof taken on line 44, Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view through a gunsight attachment embodying another form of the present invention and showing the same mounted in operative position on a gun barrel which has a slightly different construction of bead type front sight from that shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a vertical transverse sectional view thereof taken on line 66, Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a horizontal sectional view thereof taken on line 77, Fig. 6.

Referring to Figs. 1 through 4, there is illustrated therein the barrel 10 of a shotgun having one form of a conventional bead type front sight mounted on the top of the barrel adjacent the muzzle end thereof. Such sight includes a small ball or head 11 suitably centrally mounted on a boss or base 12 which is shown as having opposite parallel vertical sides 13, 13. The sides 13 extend longitudinally of the gun barrel and the boss 12 is suitably fixed to the gun barrel.

The gunsight attachment indicated generally at 14 is shown as being adapted for quick and easy application to and removal from the shotgun barrel just described.

The gunsight attachment 14 is shown as comprising a cylindrical sleeve 15 adapted to embrace the exterior of the gun barrel 10 as illustrated in Figs. 2 through 4. Such sleeve 15 is held on the gun barrel 10 in any suitable manner such as by the set screw 16 shown as arranged in a threaded hole at the bottom central part of the sleeve 15. The set screw 16 preferably has in its outer end an out-of-round recess (not shown) adapted to receive an Allen type wrench (not shown) whereby this set screw can be readily turned either to tighten or loosen the same.

The continuity of the sleeve 15 at the top thereof is interrupted and is shown as having an upstanding head 18. This head 18 is shown as being in the form of an inverted channel running longitudinally of the sleeve 15 and formed integrally therewith. The head 18 thereby has a groove defined by parallel opposite vertical surfaces 19 transversely spaced from each other. The spacing between the opposing surfaces 19 is equal to the spacing between the opposite vertical sides 13 of the boss 12 for the ball sight 11 on the gun barrel. The groove so defined by the opposing surfaces 19 is open at its rear end and closed at its front end by a transverse web 20 which serves to tie together the two ends of the otherwise split sleeve 15. The web 20 is preferably formed integrally with the sleeve 15 and head 18.

The top or crest of the head 18 is shown as provided with a slot 21 which runs longitudinally completely through the head 18 from front to rear and partly through the transverse web 20 as shown in Fig. 2.

Arranged within the slot 21 is a sight blade 22. This sight blade 22 may be of any desired configuration but as shown is in the form of a flat-sided relatively thin plate having an upwardly and forwardly inclined rear end face 23 and at its front and opposite end a depending portion 24 adapted to rest on the upwardly facing shoulder 25 on the top of the web 20. As best shown in Fig. l, the rear upper edge portion of the head 18 is inclined as indicated at 26 on opposite sides of the blade 22 so as to be coplanar with the inclined rear end face 23 thereof.

The blade 22 may be firmly held in the slot 21 in the head 18 of the gunsight attachment in any suitable manner. As shown in Figs. 1 through 4, the blade 22 is pressfitted into the slot 21 and the bottom edge of this blade, in rear of the depending portion 24, is shown as being in alinement with the inner surface of the groove formed by the channel shaped head 18.

It will be noted that the height of this groove in the head 18 is slightly greater than the vertical distance between the top or peak of the ball sight 11 and the upper surface of the gun barrel 10. In applying the gunsight attachment shown in Figs. 1 through 4, the set screw 16 is first loosened or backed ofi to permit the sleeve 15 to he slid over the external periphery of the gun barrel 10 with the opposing parallel faces 19 of the attachment sliding along the opposite vertical fiat sides 13 of the boss 12 for the head 11. When the gunsight attachment has been arranged in the position shown in Fig. 2 with respect to the gun barrel 10, the set screw 16 is tightened so as to firmly maintain the gunsight attachment in this position. When so mounted the gunsight attachment covers the bead sight 11 which, in effect, is arranged in a pocket closed at its front end so that when the user of the gun with the attachment thereon sights down the barrel he will not see the bead sight but the blade sight 22 will be upstanding and exposed and he can sight along this blade. It will be noted that the straddling of the opposite lateral sides 13 of the base 12 for the head 11 by the opposing faces 19 of the head 18 of the gunsight attachment, orients the blade 22 in vertical alignment with the center of the bead 11 and thereby the proper angular position of the blade 22 on the gun barrel will be automatically determined.

The modified form of gunsight attachment indicated generally at 28 in Figs. 5 through 7 is adapted for a different type of front bead sight from that shown in Figs. 1 through 4. Referring to Figs. 5 through 7 the gun barrel 101 is shown as being equipped with a front sight 111 which is in the form of a small ball or bead. This bead 111 is shown as mounted on the gun barrel 101 by a very short post 121 which is suitably connected to the bead and barrel at opposite ends so as to support the bead slightly above the top surface of the barrel. The post 121 at no point has a thickness greater than the diameter of the bead 111.

In the form of gunsight attachment 28 shown in Figs. 5 through 7 there is direct engagement between the bead 111 and the attachment 28 when mounting the latter on the gun barrel 101. The gunsight attachment 28 has a cylindrical sleeve 151, a set screw 161 at its bottom, and an upstanding head 181 at its top and formed similarly to the head 18 previously described for the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 through 4, except that the groove or recess of the head 181 is provided with inner vertical opposing surfaces 191 which converge toward the front end of the gunsight attachment and are joined by the transverse web 201. The convergent inner surfaces 191 are adapted to engage the opposite sides of the bead 111 as shown in Fig. 7.

The head 181 of the gunsight attachment 28 is shown as provided with a longitudinally running slot 211 adapted to receive the sight blade 221. The sight blade 221 is similar in construction to the blade 22 described in connection with Figs. 1 through 4. However, instead of being press-fitted into its slot, the blade 221 is shown as being held in the slot 211 by means of a pair of transverse pins 29 which are arranged in registered holes provided in the upper part of the head 181 and the blade 221.

In applying the gunsight attachment 28 to the gun barrel 101, the attachment, with its set screw 161 first being loosened, is slid over the barrel until the opposing convergent inner surfaces 191 engage firmly the bead 111. Thereafter the set screw 161 is tightened so as to hold the attachment in this position. It will be noted that the gunsight attachment 28 is adapted to accommodate beads similar to 111 of different diameters, a different diameter for such a bead merely changing the axial position of the attachment relative to the bead. A relatively 4 larger bead than the bead 111 illustrated will engage the surfaces 191 closer to the open and more widely spaced end of these surfaces.

As with the form of the invention shown in Figs. 1 through 4, the modified form of gunsight attachment shown in Figs. 5 through 7 covers the front bead sight on the gun barrel and by cooperation therewith insures the vertical alinement of the sight blade 221 with the center of such bead.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention provides a simple, easily and quickly mountable and demountable gunsight attachment for converting a single barrel shotgun provided with the usual front bead sight into a gun equipped with a front blade type sight which will be properly angularly positioned on the gun barrel since the attachment is centered by mechanical cooperation with some part of the bead sight. It will further be seen that the gunsight attachment of the present invention is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and since its use requires no preliminary alteration of the gun barrel for its reception, it can be sold as an accessory item for conventional single barrel shotguns. Of course, the internal diameter of the cylindrical sleeve portion of the gunsight attachment will vary for the particular gauge of shotgun for which it is intended. It will also be seen that the sight blade carried by the attachment can be removed without great difficulty for repair or replacement with another configuration of blade type sight, as the user may prefer.

I claim:

A gunsight attachment for a shotgun barrel having a bead sight adjacent its muzzle end and including a bead, said attachment comprising a sleeve adapted to be slid onto said barrel, means for holding said sleeve fast to said barrel after being mounted thereon, an upstanding head on said sleeve and having a recess therein open at its rear end and closed at its front end and on its inner side; opening to the interior of said sleeve and having opposing fiat side walls converging toward the front end thereof, the angle between said side walls being bisected by an imaginary plane in which the central longitudinal axis of said sleeve lies, said recess being adapted to receive said bead with said convergent side walls engaging opposite sides thereof so as to angularly position the attachment on said barrel, and a sight blade on said head and projecting upwardly from the top thereof in vertical alinement with said axis and hence with said bead.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 852,047 Westlake Apr. 30, 1907 1,222,620 Gaynor et a1 Apr. 17, 1917 1,318,424 Williams Oct. 14, 1919 1,743,906 Valeriano Jan. 14, 1930 2,079,266 Vaver May 4, 1937 2,239,231 Hooks Apr. 22, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US852047 *Sep 6, 1906Apr 30, 1907Bertrand B WestlakeSight.
US1222620 *Feb 23, 1916Apr 17, 1917Thomas Francis GaynorSighting and range-finding device for firearms.
US1318424 *Feb 14, 1919Oct 14, 1919 Gun-sight
US1743906 *Jan 29, 1923Jan 14, 1930Valeriano Benito DRifle sight
US2079266 *Feb 20, 1936May 4, 1937Benjamin A TetzlaffGun sight
US2239231 *Jul 12, 1939Apr 22, 1941Draper Hooks JamesGun sight
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3090123 *Jun 10, 1958May 21, 1963Barnes Frank AShotgun sight
US4008536 *Mar 10, 1975Feb 22, 1977Adams Jean MDetachable gun sight mounts
US5210953 *Sep 6, 1991May 18, 1993Small Roger EDurable sight system for a firearm
US5918374 *Sep 23, 1997Jul 6, 1999Thompson & Campbell LimitedSight for a firearm and firearm including same
US6968643Feb 3, 2004Nov 29, 2005Martin WoodburyDual-zero sight for a firearm
US7181882Nov 29, 2005Feb 27, 2007Martin WoodburyDual-zero sight for a firearm
US20040226213 *Feb 3, 2004Nov 18, 2004Martin WoodburyDual-zero sight for a firearm
US20150027027 *Jul 25, 2014Jan 29, 2015Aaron Wade FrederickFirearm Lead Sight
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/144
International ClassificationF41G1/02, F41G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/02
European ClassificationF41G1/02