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Publication numberUS2782756 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1957
Filing dateSep 12, 1955
Priority dateSep 12, 1955
Publication numberUS 2782756 A, US 2782756A, US-A-2782756, US2782756 A, US2782756A
InventorsHunt William G
Original AssigneeHunt William G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for applying spots of glue to sheets of paper
US 2782756 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1957 w. G. HUNT 2,782,756

MACHINE FOR APPLYING SPOTS OF GLUE TO SHEETS OF PAPER Filed Sept. 12, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet l IN VEN TOR.

W/LL/AM 6 Hum- ATTORNEY Feb. 26, 1957 w, HUNT 2,782,756

MACHINE FOR APPLYING SPOTS OF GLUE TO SHEETS OF PAPER Filed Sept. 12, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 88 94 /04 /06 INVENTOR.

MLL/AM 6. HUN?- 7% 4' ATTORNEY United States PatentC MACHINE FOR APPLYING SPOTS F GLUE To SHEETS OF PAPER William G. Hunt, Laurinburg, N. C. Application September 12, 1955, Serial No. 533,668

7 Claims. (Cl. 118-211) This invention relates to printers machines and more particularly to gluing machines for use in applying glue to sheets of paper that are assembled to form multi-leaf forms.

The assemblage of a plurality of printed sheets and carbon paper into what is commonly known as a collated form has heretofore required the use of a very complicated and expensive machine which is well beyond the financial reach of the average printing establishment or business oflice. Hence, a relatively few large printing businesses are the only ones that are equipped with facilities for the economical production of collated forms.

It is the principal object of this invention to provide an improved machine for forming multi-leaf forms.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a much simplified and inexpensive gluing machine which is to be used in the production of collated forms for applying the glue to the individual sheets.

. Another object of the invention is the provision of a gluing machine provided with novel means for controlling the amount of glue transferred to the sheets.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a gluing machine of the type described incorporating a simplified and improved actuating means driven by a conventional vacuum motor of the type used to drive automobile windshield wipers.

Other objects will be in part apparent and in part pointed out specifically hereinafter in connection with the description of the drawing which follows, and in which:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of the entire machine;

Figure 2 is a section taken along line 2-2 of Figure 1 showing the position of the machine at the beginning and the end of its operating cycle;

' Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2 showing the machine in position at the end of the forward stroke of the cycle at which point the glue is transferred to the sheets; and

Figure 4 is a view taken along line 4-4 of Figure 3 showing the actuating mechanism.

Referring now in particular to Figures 1 and 2 of the drawing, it will be seen that work table is provided with a Hat top 12 having a plurality of longitudinally extending spaced parallel slots 14. In the preferred construction plates 16 are placed in spaced parallel relation to one another overlying .the table top with the spaces therebetween coinciding with the slots, as shown. A pile of paper 18 to be glued is placed upon the plates and held in the desired longitudinal position relative to the table by pins 20 which extend upwardly through the slots in the table top and are fastened to transversely extending longitudinally adjustable bars 22 on the underside of the table top. The two adjustable bars 22 are held against the underside of the table top by means of thumb screws 24 which are adapted to slide longitudinally with mono 'of the parallel slots 14. The pins 20 engage the sides 'of the paper pile 18 and are adjustable to. any

longitudinal position on the face of the table top to retain the paper pile in correct position.

2,782,756 Patented Feb. 26, 1957 Longitudinally extending, transversely adjustable steps 26 and 28 are provided on the table top and used to engage the top and bottom edges of the paper pile 18 to position the paper pile in the desired transverse position relative to the table.

A glue trough 30 is mounted to the rear of and above the paper pile parallel to the adjacent edge thereof. The front side of the glue trough 30 is provided with pins 32 at each end which fit into notches 34 in supporting brackets 36. The rear side of the glue trough is provided with an internally threaded collar 38 into which is threaded screw 40. The lower end of screw 40 rests upon the surface of the table top and adjustment thereof within the threaded collar causes the glue trough to tilt about pins 32 located at the forward portion of the trough. The word glue as used herein is intended.v to mean any of the many adhesives suitable for use in making collated forms.

With particular reference now to Figures 1, 2 and 3 of the drawing, it will be seen that the machine is pro vided with a U-shaped operating arm 42 which moves in an arcuate path forwardly and rearwardly between the positions shown in Figures 2 and 3. The operating. arm 42 moves within slot 44 in the rear edge of the table and the lower stem 46 of the operating arm is operatively connected to an actuating mechanism indicated in a general way by numeral 48. Upper stem 50 of the operating arm is positioned above the table top and pro vides a support for the gluing assembly, indicated in a general way by numeral 52. The gluing assembly 52 is supported on the forward end of upper stem 50 of the operating arm by a vertically adjustable supporting arm 54. Three longitudinally extending rods 56, 58 and 60 are carried on the lower end of supporting arm 54 in spaced parallel relation to one another and parallel to the plane of the table top. A plurality of L-shaped glue receiving fingers 62 are mounted on the middle rod 56 for pivotal movement in spaced longitudinal relation. The rearmost of the three rods 60 provides a stop to limit the rearward pivotal movement of the L-shaped glue receiving fingers and the forwardrnost rod 58 acts as a stop to limit the forward pivotal movement of the glue fingers. The arrangement of the gluing assembly 52 with respect to the glue trough 30 is such that the tapered tips 64 of the glue fingers will dip into the glue trough when pivoted rearwardly against rod 60 which is the operative position of the fingers. When the glue fingers are pivoted forwardly against rod 58 they lie in inoperative position as they cannot pick up and transfer any glue.

In connection with Figure 1, it will be seen that only those glue fingers which will impinge upon the paper when the operating rod is moved to the position shown in Figure 3 are placed in the operative position; whereas, the glue fingers which lie beyond the sides of the paper pile are placed in inoperative position. When the operating arm is in the position shown in Figure 2, the tapered tips 64 of the operating glue fingers will be immersed in the glue within the glue trough if the glue fingers are in operative position. The depth to which the tapered tips are immersed in the glue trough is controlled by adjustment of screw 40 within threaded collar 38 which tilts the glue trough relative to the glue fingers. Thus, the quantity of glue picked up by the tapered tips of the glue fingers is controlled by tilting the glue trough. As the operating arm carries the .glue fingers to the position shown in Figure 3, those fingers which have been placed in operative position transfer the glue from the trough to the desired position on the paper in a line of longitudinally spaced glue spots. The pivotal connection between the fingers and the center rod 56 enables the operative the thickness of the paper pile 18.

The actuating mechanism 48 by which the forward and rearward arcuate movement of the operatingrod-42 is accomplished, will now be described in detail in connection with Figures 2, 3 and 4 of the drawing. The entire actuating mechanism is mounted on a sideplate 66 which is provided with a portion 68 extending at right angles from the upper edge thereof which forms means for suspending the sideplate and actuating mechanism attached thereto from the underside of the tabletop 12. The lower stem 46 of the operating arm is connected to parallel arms 70 and 72, shown most clearly in Figure 4, for arcuate movement in the direction of arrows A and Aof Figures 2 and 3. The lower ends of the arms are mounted on the sideplate for pivotal movement about pivots 74 and 76; and, the upper ends of the arms are connected to stem 46 of the operating aim for pivotal movement about pivots 78 and 80. The arms control the arcuate path followed by the operating armfrom the position shown in Figure 2 in which the glue fingers are immersed in the glue trough, to the position shown in Figure 3 'where the glue fingers impinge upon the paper and back again. The sideplate is provided with motor brackets 82 and 84 which support a conventional vacuum motor 86 of the type used to operate automobile windshield wipers. Vacuum line 88 connects the vacuum motor to a vacuum pump, not shown. The vacuum motor 86 is positioned with respect to the lower stem 46 of the operating arm in a manner such that rocker arm 90 which interconnects the shaft 92 of the motor and pivot 80 of the operating arm will cause the operating arm to move through the arcuate pathA and A. Rocker arm 90 is rigidly connected to shaft 92 of the motor and oscillates back and forth in the conventional manner causing the glue fingers to move from the glue trough to the paper and back again as aforementioned.

Intermittent cyclic operation of the vacuum motor is accomplished by means of a structure which will now be described in detail. Vacuum motor 86 is of the conventional type having a slide valve 94 which when moved from the position shown in Figure 3 to the position shown inFigure 2 will open and permit a vacuumtobe created on one side of movable vane 96 within the vacuum motor. The conventional design of the vacuum.motor is such that with the slide valve open as shown in Figure 2, the rocker arm 90 will move through its entire forward stroke tothe position shown'in Figure 3, whereupon the slide valve may be closed and the rocker arm will automatically return to its original position. Thus, intermittent cyclic operation of the gluing machine can be accomplished by opening the slide valve to begin the stroke of the rocker. arm and leaving the slide valve open untilthe forward stroke thereof is completed. As -soon as v the rocker .arm reachesits extremeforward position, movement of the vane inside the motor causes the slide valve to bev by-passed automatically and the vacuum transferred to the opposite side of thevane 96 which reverses-the direction of the rocker arm, whereupon the rocker arm makes its return stroke to its original position and stops. Closing of the slide valve following termination ofthe forward stroke of the rocker arm has no effect on the return stroke which takes place automatically. Iherefore, stem 46 of the operating arm is providedwith a trigger rod 98 which contactsand closesslidevalve.94.near the completion of the forward stroke of the rocker .arm as shown most clearly in ,Figure 3. When the roclgerarm completes the'return stroke and is again in its original position, movement of the vanein the motor reco'nnects the slide valve into the vacuum. line, whereupon the slide valve, again becomes operative to clo sethe' vacuum met and prevent the rocker arm from.beginning. aliqtherl cycleof operation until theslide valve .is'againf. p

Slide valve 94 is moved; from; closed onpiengposirion y m an of p v a m ,l flw s -is mqv is movement on ,motor braeket 84, as ,shown. is attached to the pivotfarm a'nd, acts .;to 1 e of the slide valve. Pivot arm 100 is provided with a stop 104 which acts against the motor bracket 84 to limit the movement of the pivot arm in a direction to open the slide valve. The actuating mechanism is provided with a foot pedal 106 which is connected to the end of pivot arm by link 108.

Operation In order to operate the gluing machine of the present invention, a pile of paper is placed upon the table top in the correct longitudinal'and transverse position relative thereto to receive the operative glue fingers along the desired line as shown in Figure 3. The paper is held in this position by pins 20 and the transversely adjustable stops 26 and 28. The glue trough is'the'n tilted relative to the glue fingers so that the correct amount of glue will be picked up thereby and transferred to the paper.

Pressure upon foot pedal 106 acts through link 108 to move the ,pivot arm 100 and open the slide valve;94. As soon as the pressure on the foot pedal is released the spring 102 returns the pivot arm to its original position. When the slide valve is opened, as shown in Figure 2, a vacuum is created on one side of vane 96 of the vacuum motor which causes the rocker .arm 90 to move through I its forward stroke into the position shown in Figure 3. The forward .stroke of the rocker arm is transmitted through pivot to operating arm 42, causing the operat ingarm to move inan arcuate path determined by parallel arms 70 and 72. Forward movement of the operating arm causes the glue fingers to be lifted from the glue trough. and moved .to a point where they impinge upon the paper-and deposit theglue.

Immediately prior to the time the rocker arm reaches theend .of its forward stroke, trigger rod 98 engages the slide valve 94 and moves it from open to closed position. Completion of the forward stroke of the rocker arm, however, automaticallyby-passes the slide valve and shifts the vacuum fromone side of the movable vane 96 to the other so that the rocker arm will be returned to its original position even though the slide valve is closed. As soon as the actuatingarm reaches its original position, the motor again acts automatically to connect the slide valve into the vacuum line. The slide valve is now in a closed position, however, which prevents. the start of another ,cycle until such time as the slide valve is again opened.

Reference during the detailed description has been made only to multi-leaf forms and piles of paper, but it' is'to be understood "that the machine is designed for atfixing a glue lineto suceessive layers of original forms, carbons and copies forbinding togetherinto what'is commonly called the snap-out form." In the claims, the term .sheets is meant to include such paper forms.

It can be appreciated from the foregoing disclosure that the present machine readily' accomplishes the objects outlined. vBeing aware of various possible modifications, I desire it to be understood that thescope of my invention is vnot to .belimited to anyspecifiedisclosure, 'but is to include the; fundamental principles. involved as defined "by the structural terms and equivaIentsofYthe appended claims. Y

I claim:

1. A'gluingmachine comprising a table on \vhich sheets may be stacked inQfixed'position, an adhesive re ervoir containing an adhesive, a'mova-ble supporting "frame having a rod positioned above the adhesive reservoir, a plurality of glue .receiving fingers. mounted onthe rod forpivotal movement in" spaced relation to o ne another, said ifinger's being. normally immersed in I the adhesive in the adhesive reservoiflstopmeans carried by the supportingr a'nae forlimitingthe downward pivotal movement of l.-I -f elvi s ns si o th he v memo f d; Q membr nes wines; to the supp r n fram for ia t nm c p at xv mv vem n th tragi n' ts u sequ ns-fi ger set i therebvfp ing h glue jq ,ine in rs-.fmmth adh s e-r servoir to the sheets and back again during each cycle of operation whereby adhesive may be applied to the sheets.

2. A gluing machine comprising a table on which sheets may be stacked in fixed position, a glue reservoir containing glue, a movable supporting frame having a rod positioned above the glue reservoir, a plurality of substantially L-shaped glue receiving fingers mounted on the rod for pivotal movement in spaced relation to one another, the tips of the Ls furthest removed from the mounting on the rod being immersed in the glue in the glue reservoir, stop means carried by the supporting frame for limiting the downward pivotal movement of the glue receiving fingers into the glue reservoir, and drive means comprising a windshield wiper type vacuum motor operatively connected to the supporting frame for imparting cyclic oscillatory movement to the frame and glue receiving fingers carried thereby in order that the glue receiving fingers may be moved from the glue reservoir to the sheets and back again during each cycle of operation of the vacuum motor.

3. A gluing machine comprising a table on which sheets may be stacked in fixed position, a glue reservoir contain ing glue, a movable supporting frame having a rod positioned above the glue reservoir, a plurality of glue receiving fingers mounted on the rod for pivotal movement in spaced relation to one another, said fingers being immersed in the glue in the glue reservoir, stop means carried by the supporting frame for limiting the downward pivotal movement of the glue receiving fingers into the glue reservoir, adjustment means supporting the glue reservoir for varying the depth at which the glue receiving fingers become immersed in said reservoir, and drive means operatively connected to the supporting frame for imparting cyclic oscillatory movement to the frame and glue receiving fingers carried thereby for moving the glue receiving fingers from the glue reservoir to the sheets and back again during each cycle of operation.

4. A gluing machine comprising a table on which sheets may be stacked in fixed position, a glue trough containing glue, a movable supporting frame carrying a front, middle and rear rod above the glue trough in spaced parallel relation, a plurality of glue receiving fingers mounted on the middle rod for independent pivotal movement in spaced relation to one another, pivotal movement of said fingers in one direction causing said fingers to become immersed in the glue in the glue trough, one of said front and rear rods acting as a stop to limit the pivotal movement of the glue receiving fingers in the direction to enter the glue trough, and the other of said rods acting to limit the pivotal movement of the glue receiving fingers in the other direction to support said fingers in inoperative position, adjustment means supporting the glue trough for varying the depth at which the glue receiving fingers become immersed in the glue, and drive means comprising a windshield wiper type vacuum motor operatively connected to the supporting frame for imparting cyclic oscillatory movement to the frame and glue receiving fingers carried thereby in order that the glue receiving fingers may be moved from the glue trough to the sheets and back again during each cycle of operation of the vacuum motor.

5. A gluing machine comprising a table on which sheets may be stacked in fixed position, a glue trough containing glue, a movable supporting frame having a rod positioned above the glue trough, a plurality of substantially L-shaped glue receiving fingers mounted on the rod for independent pivotal movement in spaced relation to one another, the tips of the Us furthest removed from the mounting on the rod being immersed in the glue in the glue trough when pivoted in one direction, stop means carried by the supporting frame for limiting the pivotal movement of the L- shaped fingers in the direction to immerse the bases thereof in the glue, stop means carried by the supporting frame for limiting the pivotal movement of the L-shaped fingers in the opposite direction in order that said fingers may be placed in inoperative position, and drive means operatively connected to the supporting frame for moving the L- slraped fingers from the glue trough to the sheets and back again.

6. In a gluing machine of the type having a glue reservoir, a glue transfer mechanism positioned to receive glue from the reservoir, and a drive mechanism operatively connected to the glue transfer mechanism for moving said mechanism from the glue reservoir to a stack of sheets, the improved glue receiving mechanism which comprises a supporting rod operatively connected to 'the drive means and positioned above the glue reservoir, a plurality of substantially L-shaped glue receiving fingers mounted on the rod for independent pivotal movement in spaced parallel relation to one another, the tips of the Us furthest removed from the mounting on the rod being immersed in the glue reservoir, and stop means for limiting the degree of immersion of the glue receiving fingers in the glue reservoir.

7. A gluing machine comprising a support on which a plurality of paper sheets may be stacked, adhesive supply means, means for transferring adhesive from the supply means to the sheets, said transferring means including movable means mounted on the support and a plurality of adhesive receiving fingers pivotally mounted on the movable means, drive means operatively connected to the movable means for moving the fingers from the supply means to the sheets and back again whereby adhesive may be applied to the sheets, said fingers being mounted in spaced relation to one another, and means for limiting the downward pivotal movement of the fingers.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 694,915 Gilfillan et al Mar. 4, 1902 748,428 Simonson Dec. 29, 1903 2,113,690 Harrington Apr. 12, 1938 2,203,572 Johnson June 4, 1940 2,546,522 Quackenbush Mar. 27 1951 2,665,661 Searle Jan. 12, 1954 2,730,991 Baughan Jan. 17, 1956

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2893024 *Oct 2, 1957Jul 7, 1959Salomone AlessandroMachine for the production of books and the like having centrally uninterrupted double pages
US2925611 *May 6, 1957Feb 23, 1960Patterson Charles RPrinting press attachment
US2982979 *May 11, 1959May 9, 1961Patterson Charles RAutomatic pasting machine for paper sheets or the like
US3025830 *Jun 8, 1959Mar 20, 1962Mages Alvin EAdhesive applicator
US3034476 *May 5, 1958May 15, 1962Didde Carl WApparatus for applying adhesive to sheet material
US3280793 *Feb 15, 1963Oct 25, 1966New Jersey Machine CorpGumming machine
US3457131 *Apr 21, 1966Jul 22, 1969American Greetings CorpApparatus and method for applying objects to sheet members
US4381601 *Jun 24, 1981May 3, 1983Tokyo Shibaura Denki Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for mounting electronic components
US5111637 *Feb 15, 1991May 12, 1992Highland Supply CorporationMethod for wrapping a floral grouping
US5137593 *Jun 7, 1990Aug 11, 1992Gbr Systems CorporationMethod of assembling and adhering sheets together
US5223076 *Sep 25, 1991Jun 29, 1993Gbr Systems Corp.Mechanism for assemblying and adhering sheets together
US5239804 *Apr 9, 1992Aug 31, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod for wrapping a floral grouping
US5267066 *Mar 26, 1992Nov 30, 1993Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display device, method of correcting defective pixels, and defective-pixel correcting apparatus used therein
US5459976 *Jan 13, 1993Oct 24, 1995Highland Supply CorporationMethod for wrapping a floral grouping
US5752360 *Jun 7, 1995May 19, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method for wrapping a flower pot with a sheet material constructed of paper and having a pattern embossed thereon
US5820712 *May 12, 1995Oct 13, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a pot with a cover having an adhesive thereon
US5895553 *Apr 17, 1996Apr 20, 1999Sasib S.P.A.Device for applying glue to wrapper sheets, especially cold glue, in cigarettes packaging machines or the like
US6347480Jun 28, 2000Feb 19, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method for wrapping a floral grouping with a sheet of material constructed of paper and having printed and embossed patterns thereon
US6533886Mar 28, 2001Mar 18, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of covering a flower pot
US6564507Jun 26, 2002May 20, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method for wrapping a floral grouping with a sheet of material having printed and embossed patterns thereon
US6946045Apr 16, 2004Sep 20, 2005Wanda M. Weder And William F. StraelerMethod of covering a flower pot or floral grouping
US6991697Mar 31, 2005Jan 31, 2006Wanda M. Weder And William F. StraeterMethod of covering a flower pot or floral grouping
EP0506454A2 *Mar 27, 1992Sep 30, 1992Sharp Kabushiki KaishaLiquid crystal display device, method of correcting defective pixels, and defective-pixel correcting apparatus used therein
EP0744219A1 *May 14, 1996Nov 27, 1996SASIB S.p.A.Device for applying glue to wrapper sheets, especially cold glue, in cigarettes packaging machines or the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/211, 118/216, 118/236, 118/243, 156/558, 156/561, 412/37
International ClassificationB05C1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB42C9/0081, B05C1/027, B05C1/025
European ClassificationB42C9/00D, B05C1/02D, B05C1/02F