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Publication numberUS2784559 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1957
Filing dateJun 9, 1953
Priority dateJun 9, 1953
Publication numberUS 2784559 A, US 2784559A, US-A-2784559, US2784559 A, US2784559A
InventorsKajmo Paul W
Original AssigneeKajmo Paul W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressure equalizing diving bell
US 2784559 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 12, 1957 P. w. KAJMO PRESSURE EQUALIZING DIVING BELL Filed June 9, 1953 Fig.

1f. fawn? Paul. W Kajma' IN VEN TOR Unite States Patent PRESSURE EQUALIZING DIVING BELL Paul W. Kajmo, Hellertown, Pa.

Application June 9, 1953, Serial No. 360,491

8 Claims. (Cl. 61-439) This invention relates to an apparatus for submarine exploration and more particularly to a diving bell having mounted therein suitable cameras and photographic equipment whereby data can be recorded concerning the life of the denizens of the greater depths.

The primary object of this invention resides in the provision of diving bell having means associated therewith whereby as may be necessary, gas can be generated into the diving bell to maintain the level of water within the diving bell at a predetermined gradient. In the prior art diving bells, one of the great difficulties reside in the fact that when great depths are achieved, the water will enter from the bottom or open end of the diving bell to compress the gas retained within the diving bell to a cornparatively small compass thus reducing the amount of space available for equipment utilized in recording data.

It is the concept of the present invention to generate gas to occupy a considerably greater volume of the diving bell then heretofore had been possible thus, maintaining the water at a given or desired level.

The construction of this invention features the use of an anode on the outside of this bill and a. cathode there within whereby upon contact of fluid with the anode and cathode, the electrolytic separation of hydrogen and oxygen will be achieved, the hydrogen remaining in the diving bell and adapted to prevent the deterioration of the cameras and photographic equipment from corrosion while the oxygen is permitted to escape to the surface of the body of water within which the diving bell is immersed.

Still further objects and features of this invention reside in the provision of a pressure equalizing diving bell that is comparatively light in weight, simple in construction, easy to utilize, and which is capable of providing increased space for instruments, cameras, and the like.

These, together with the various ancillary objects and features of the invention which will become apparent as the following description proceeds are attained by this diving bell, a preferred embodiment of which has been illustrated in the accompanying drawings, by way of example only, wherein:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the diving bell comprising the present invention, parts thereof being broken away to show other parts in detail;

Figure 2 is a vertical sectional detail view illustrating the manner in which the anode and cathode are connected to conductors which extend through the top of the diving bell and are electrically operatively connected to a generator or other source of electrical current above the surface of the body of water within which this diving bell is immersed; and

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view as taken along the plane of line 3-3 of Figure 2.

With continuing reference to the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals designate similar parts throughout the various views, reference numeral generally designates the diving bell comprising the present invention. This diving bell 10 includes a preferably cylindrical container 12 having a top wall 14 to which a 2,784,559 Patented Mar. 12, 1957 ice fitting 16 is attached, the cable or chain 18 used in raising and lowering the diving bell 10 being attached to the fitting 16. It is intended, because of the construction of this invention to utilize comparatively light weight metal for the construction of the container 12, the weight of metal being satisfactory to insure a controlled and proper rate of descent of the diving bell through the water.

The container 12 has attached thereto by suitable insulated connecting members and spaces 20 an anode 22 of cylindrical configuration which is concentric with the container 12. A cathode 24 is positioned within the container 12 and held in spaced relationship therefrom by insulative spacers 26. It is to be noted that both the anode and cathode are spaced from the lower edge 28 of the container 12 for a purpose which will be clarified as this description ensues. Connected to the anode 22, is a conductor 30 which extends through an aperture .32 in the side walls of the container 12, the aperture being guarded against flow of water by means of suitable gaskets and fittings, the conductor 30 also extending through the top wall 14 of the container 12 and being connected to a suitable source of electrical power, such as a high capacity generator on a vessel floating on the surface of the water within which this device has been lowered.

The anode 22 is connected by means of a suitable conductor 34 to the source of electrical power and extends through the top wall 14 of the container 12. Means are utilized to insure against escape of gas from the confines of the container 12 or the influx of water thereinto at the points Where the conductors 30 and 34 extend through the walls of the container 12. The container 12 may be provided with a port or window 36 therein and within the confines of the container 12, there are mounted cameras, as at 38, which are adapted to take pictures through the port 36 and other instruments may be confined within the container 12.

The bell 10 together with the equipment, such as cameras 38 installed therein is of a greater weight than the weight of an equal volume of water displaced by the diving bell when the diving bell is in an immersed position. This assures that the diving bell will always sink readily and smoothly to any desired level. It is to be recognized that as the diving bell sinks lower, the gas pressure in the diving bell will increase and thus there will be an additional amount of gas and hence weight of gas within the diving bell thus in fact increasing the weight of thediving bell. There is no need for a ballast system for the diving bell though of course, if a very large diving bell were to be constructed, such may be desired. The diving bell with its associated equipment is heavier than the volume of water displaced and hence will readily sink. It is merely raised or lowered to its desired depth in the water or out of the Water as may be desired.

In operation, as the bell is lowered into the water, the increasing pressure forces water up into the opening in the bottom of the bell. When the water comes into contact with the cathode on the inside of the bell, an electrically operative circuit is closed and current flows through the electrodes using the water as an electrolyte. The effect of electrolysis will be such that difierent gases are given ofi at each electrode. The gas from the anode is allowed to escape, this is, of course, preferably oxygen and so any possible reaction that might occur from the intermixing of the oxygen with the hydrogen emanating from the cathode is prevented. Hydrogen from the cathode 24 is collected within the bell. As more water is pushed into the bell by the increasing pressure on lowering of the bell, more hydrogen gas is evolved at the cathode, forcing the water level inside the bell back downwardly and into a state of equilibrium, the hydrogen gas pressure balancing the waters depth pressure. It is to be understood that the bell must be lowered at a given rate, dependent, of course, upon the amount of the electrical power utilized which of course, determines the rate of production of the hydrogen. It is to be noted that the concentric rings 22 and 24 forming theanode and cathode respectively, have been utilized in order to provide the maximum effective anode and cathode surface.

When the bell is raised, the gas pressure inside the bell escapes through the opening in the bottom as the water pressure decreases. This action automatically reduces the pressure inside the bell as it is being raised. It is to be understood that cameras and other equipment inside thebell must have equalizing apertures therein thereby avoiding collapse.

Since from the foregoing, the construction and advantages of this diving bell, for. use at great depths, are readily apparent, further description is believed to be unnecessary.

However, since numerous modifications will readily occur to those skilled in the art, after a consideration of the foregoing specification and accompanying drawings, it is not intended to limit the invention to the precise embodiment shown and described, but all suitable modifications and equivalents may readily resort to which fall within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell on the outer surface thereof, a cathodesecured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected to a-source of electrical power.

2. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raisingand lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving'bell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to said diving hell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected 'to'a source of electrical power.

3. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great'depth comprising a hollow container'open'at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving hell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, said cathode being concentric with said diving bell and said anode and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected to a source of electrical power.

4. A pressure equalizingdiving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving bell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to saiddiving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode and extending through the top of said diving bell, and connected to a source of electrical power above the surface of the body of water wherein said diving bell is immersed.

5. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode securedtosaid diving hell on the outer surface thereof, a cathode secured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected to a source of electrical power, said cathode being vertically spaced from the bottom edge of said container.

6. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording atgreat depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving bell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected to a source of electrical power, said cathode being vertically spaced from the bottom edge of said container.

7. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container open at its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving hell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode electrically connected to a source of electrical power, said cathode being vertically spaced from the bottom edge of said container.

-8. A pressure equalizing diving bell for submarine data recording at great depth comprising a hollow container openat'its lower end, means for raising and lowering said container, an anode secured to said diving bell concentric with said diving bell on the outer surface thereof and insulated therefrom, a cathode secured to said diving bell on the inside of said diving bell, and conductors connected to said anode and said cathode and extending through the top of said diving bell and con nected to a source of electrical power above the surface of the body of water wherein said diving bell is immersed, said cathode being vertically spaced from the bottom edge of said container.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US97862 *Dec 14, 1869 Improvement in diving-bells
US908095 *Aug 31, 1908Dec 29, 1908Edward J HassanDiving-bell.
US1364337 *Aug 21, 1919Jan 4, 1921White Manley ADiving-bell
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3020722 *Mar 25, 1957Feb 13, 1962Harter James R RSubmarine vehicle
US3112724 *Feb 8, 1961Dec 3, 1963Anelex CorpDeep diving submarine
US3129403 *Sep 2, 1959Apr 14, 1964James R R HarterAutomatic marine beacon
US3221506 *Apr 16, 1964Dec 7, 1965Shell Oil CoSupport structures
US3229246 *Sep 20, 1961Jan 11, 1966Harris Jack RMethods and apparatus for producing sound energy in water
US3344614 *Oct 4, 1965Oct 3, 1967Walter ByckUnderwater observation bell chamber
US3543526 *May 20, 1968Dec 1, 1970Westinghouse Electric CorpUnderwater submersible chamber system
US4274405 *Jun 20, 1979Jun 23, 1981Perry Oceanographics, Inc.Method for varying the ambient pressure in a vessel
US4657116 *Jul 17, 1985Apr 14, 1987Exxon Production Research Co.Vibration-isolating apparatus
US4861451 *Nov 23, 1987Aug 29, 1989Hammond Royce Corporation Pty. LimitedChlorinator cell
US5433164 *Mar 22, 1994Jul 18, 1995Sneath; Andrew J. S.Submersible vessel
Classifications
U.S. Classification405/193, 204/272, 114/312
International ClassificationB63C11/44, B63C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63C11/44
European ClassificationB63C11/44